Consumer Reports says Apple's new iPad heats to 116 degrees running games

This is a discussion on Consumer Reports says Apple's new iPad heats to 116 degrees running games within the Apple Forums Member News Depot forums, part of the Apple News Room category; Consumer Reports, the consumer advocacy group that gained notoriety for refusing to recommend Apple's iPhone 4 because of its external antenna, has tested Apple's new ...

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    Consumer Reports says Apple's new iPad heats to 116 degrees running games

    Consumer Reports, the consumer advocacy group that gained notoriety for refusing to recommend Apple's iPhone 4 because of its external antenna, has tested Apple's new iPad and found it can heat up to 116 degrees when running graphic-intensive games [updated].







    Update: The tests from Consumer Reports were quickly published on Tuesday afternoon, and the organization said its engineers recorded temperatures as high as 116 degrees Fahrenheit while playing Epic's "Infinity Blade II." The iPad was standing up with Apple's Smart Cover, the 4G LTE connection was not turned on, and the tablet was plugged in while the game ran for 45 minutes.

    The highest unplugged temperature for the new iPad was found to be 113 degrees Fahrenheit, while plugged in it reached 116 degrees. Those temperatures were 13 degrees and 12 degrees hotter, respectively, than identical tests conducted with the iPad 2.

    "During our tests, I held the new iPad in my hands. When it was at its hottest, it felt very warm but not especially uncomfortable if held for a brief period," author Donna L. Tapellini wrote.

    The testing also found that the iPad wouldn't recharge its battery while the game was running and it was plugged in. Instead, the battery continued to drain, suggesting the power draw of the new A5X processor was too great for the iPad's USB connection to overcome during heavy use.

    Earlier Tuesday, Consumer Reports indicated its plans to publish its findings. In a "First Look Review" published last week, Consumer Reports said Apple's third-generation tablet was "shaping up as the best tablet yet."

    "The iPad's high-resolution display requires more power, and the efficiency of the A5X should help mitigate the battery drain it causes," the group wrote last week. "We'll post results of our battery life tests soon."

    Of course, it's that larger battery, Retina display and more powerful quad-core graphics processing that have led to a slight increase in operating temperature on the new iPad, when compared to last year's iPad 2. Apple issued a comment on the matter earlier Tuesday, stating that the new iPad operates "well within" its temperature specifications.

    The issue began to gain traction this week after an infrared test of the new iPad found it runs 10 degrees hotter, on average, than the iPad 2. The new iPad was measured at 92.5 degrees Fahrenheit, while the iPad 2 measured 83 degrees Fahrenheit.



    Left: New iPad, Right: iPad 2.



    Consumer Reports made waves last year when it ranked the iPhone 4 the best smartphone available on the market, but later changed its stance and stated it couldn't recommend the iPhone 4. The group tested the iPhone 4 inside a controlled radio frequency isolation chamber, and found that covering the bottom left corner of the handset with one's bare hand could reduce reception.

    But the consumer advocacy group took a more favorable view of the iPhone 4S when it was released last year, stating that any reception issues were addressed with the updated handset.


    3-20-12

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    Thermal test of iPad's A5X chip shows operating temperature of 97 degrees F

    Thermal test of iPad's A5X chip shows operating temperature of 97 degrees F





    As numerous reports claim Apple's new iPad is warmer than the previous generation, a new analysis has found the A5X chip in the new device runs as much as 16 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the A5 chip in the iPad 2.

    According to a series of tests conducted by Repair Labs, the A5X chip registered temperatures up to 36 degrees celsius (96.8 degrees Fahrenheit), compared to A5 readings of 27 degrees C (80.6 degrees F). The experiment involved opening up the tablets in order to directly measure the temperatures of the chips.

    Technicians measured multiple components inside the new iPad in order to verify that the A5X was the part putting out the most heat. The report speculated that a difference in materials between the A5 and the A5X may be a contributing factor, as the A5 is believed to be ceramic, while the A5X is "obviously metallic."

    An external test involved having the two iPads to play movies on Netflix. The third-generation iPad started at 27 degrees C (80.6 degrees F) and warmed up to 32-33 degrees C (89.6-91.4 degrees F), while the iPad 2 started at 24 degrees C (75.2 degrees F) and only climbed to 25-26 degrees C (77-78.8 degrees F).

    Repair Labs said it was was unable to reproduce the 116 degree F temperatures that Consumer Reports noted earlier on Tuesday, though it did note that holding the new iPad 3 "could be noticeably warmer after only a few minutes use," especially if held where the A5X is located.






    Writing for Consumer Reports, Donna L. Tapellini said that the new iPad felt "very warm" when at its hottest, but not "especially uncomfortable if held for a brief period." The story was quickly picked up by other outlets, some of which dubiously claimed that Apple's new tablet could cause burns.

    Consumer Reports is no stranger to controversy with Apple's devices. The consumer advocacy group retracted its recommendation of the iPhone 4 in 2010 because it was able to reproduce a signal-loss problem in the device. With the release of the iPhone 4S last year, the group announced that Apple had resolved the issue."

    Separate tests conducted by Tested found a maximum temperature of 82 degrees F on the third-generation iPad when playing "Infinity Blade II," the same app used by Consumer Reports in its tests.






    Display expert Dr. Raymond Soneira of DisplayMate attributes the new iPad's extra warmth to the fact that the device has approximately twice as many LEDs as its predecessor. "The LEDs give off 2.5 times as much heat as the iPad 2 and so will the battery and power electronics on the new iPad compared to the iPad 2," he said.

    An infrared test conducted earlier this week by a Dutch site found the new iPad to have reached 92.5 degrees F during a GLBenchmark test, almost 10 degrees hotter than the 83 degrees F measured on the iPad 2 during the same test.

    For its part, Apple issued a statement on Tuesday that the new iPad operates "well within [its] thermal specifications" and urged customers with concerns to contact its support service.


    3-21-12

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    Thermal testing shows new iPad no hotter than Android tablets, notebooks

    New thermal testing of the latest third generation iPad by PCWorld has confirmed what CNET reported last week: "the issue seems to be overblown," the magazine stated.

    PCWorld tests tablets' temperatures

    Infrared thermometer testing by PCWorld found that the new third generation iPad can run 2-7 degrees Fahrenheit (less than 4 degrees Celsius) hotter than the previous iPad 2, but noted that its temperature readings were inline with comparable tablets, including the Asus Eee Pad Transformer Prime and Samsung Galaxy 10.1.

    The site noted that temperatures rose during charging, but that even when continuously playing a computationally intensive game for a hour while plugged into a power adapter, the highest reading they could capture was 100 degrees Fahrenheit (about 38 degrees Celsius), within 2 degrees of the Galaxy tablet.






    Operating under battery power, the latest iPad hit a top temperature reading of 97 degrees Fahrenheit (about 36 degrees Celsius) in the tests, a similar spread of about 6 degrees Fahrenheit hotter than iPad 2, but a degree cooler than the more similarly specced Galaxy tablet.

    "Despite all of the media attention over the iPad's (and other tablets') operating temperatures, the issue seems to be overblown. None of the four tablets we tested ever get so warm that I could detect screen discoloration of the type that some users of early units of the iPhone 4 reported," the report stated.

    "Asus's Transformer Prime, Apple's iPad 2, and the new iPad all have metal backs, which pull heat away from the internal components, whereas the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 has a plastic back," the magazine noted.

    "All four tablets get warmer when their brightness is set to maximum. And all will get warmer still if they are sitting in a case or are parked on an insulating surface such as a blanket or your jeans."

    CNET compares iPad to notebooks

    The PCWorld tests were inline with numbers reported by CNET, which found in its tests that "the new 2012 iPad runs warmer than the iPad 2, but it's no hotter than many laptops under similar conditions," adding that "the operating temperature is no reason for CNET to change its buying recommendation (the new iPad is currently the highest rated tablet on our site, and an Editors' Choice)."

    Its testing did not measure temperatures higher than 98 degrees Fahrenheit (about 36 degrees Celsius; cooler than the human body temperature) on the new iPad even when setting the screen brightness to high and continuously playing Infinity Blade for 2 hours and 45 minutes. Playing Netflix movies over WiFi the new iPad's hottest point was 85 degrees Fahrenheit (about 29 degrees Celsius).

    CNET also ran compatible tests on conventional laptops, and reported that Apple's i5 MacBook Pro ran about the same temperature as the new iPad when similarly playing Netflix movies at full brightness, while a similarly configured Dell Inspiron reached a peak temperature of 113 degrees Fahrenheit (about 45 degrees Celsius) playing games.

    "The higher temperature generated by the new iPad compared with the iPad 2 was noticeable to the touch but not uncomfortably so. The warmest point we recorded on the iPad is the Apple logo on the back. In our tests it got up to 98 degrees, but it's important to put that number into perspective. Ninety-eight degrees may sound high, but that's actually less than your normal body temperature," the site noted.

    Consumer Reports iPad testing

    Last week, Consumer Reports reported temperature readings on the new iPad as high at 116 degrees Fahrenheit (about 47 degrees Celsius) while charging, activating 4G LTE, and continuously playing "Infinity Blade II" for 45 minutes.

    "During our tests, I held the new iPad in my hands. When it was at its hottest, it felt very warm but not especially uncomfortable if held for a brief period," Donna L. Tapellini wrote for the magazine.

    Epic's graphic intensive "Infinity Blade" series of games is not available for Android.

    Following a minor media frenzy surrounding the new iPad's temperature readings, Apple's spokesperson Trudy Miller issued the statement, "the new iPad delivers a stunning Retina display, A5X chip, support for 4G LTE plus 10 hours of battery life, all while operating well within our thermal specifications."


    3-26-12

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