Apple's next iMacs also rumored to receive Retina display upgrade

This is a discussion on Apple's next iMacs also rumored to receive Retina display upgrade within the Apple Rumors forums, part of the Apple News category; In addition to the MacBook Pro lineup, Apple's next-generation iMac desktops are also rumored to receive a new high-resolution Retina display. Following up on earlier ...

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    Apple's next iMacs also rumored to receive Retina display upgrade

    In addition to the MacBook Pro lineup, Apple's next-generation iMac desktops are also rumored to receive a new high-resolution Retina display.


    Following up on earlier reports that Apple would unveil thinner Retina display-equipped MacBook Pros at the forthcoming Worldwide Developers Conference in June, Joanna Stern of ABC News corroborated those details, but also included the iMac in the mix. Along with the MacBook Pro, the iMac will get a new, "very, very high resolution" display, she said.

    The detail comes on the heels of benchmark tests that appeared online for a new iMac model, identified as "13,2." The desktop tested with Geekbench featured a quad-core i7 chip at a clock speed of 3.40 gigahertz running OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, and earned a score of 12,183.

    One report in April claimed that Apple's 2012 iMac lineup will feature anti-reflective glass displays. It was also said that the new iMacs will be noticeably slimmer than the current all-in-one desktop models offered by Apple.

    The latest rumor of high-resolution iMacs suggests that Apple plans to quickly upgrade much of its Mac lineup to new Retina displays, catching up with the high pixel density screens currently found on the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch. Earlier this month, AppleInsider discovered new Retina-caliber icons hidden within Apple's latest OS X 10.7.4 update to Lion.





    An earlier report in April previously indicated that Apple was eyeing a June launch for new iMacs featuring Intel's latest-generation Ivy Bridge processors. It was said the new iMacs would feature options for Core i5 or faster Core i7 processors based on the latest chip architecture.

    The iMac lineup was last updated in May of 2011, when Apple added high-definition FaceTime cameras as well as high-speed Thunderbolt ports. The current iMacs are powered by Intel's Sandy Bridge processors and AMD Radeon HD graphics.

    5-15-12

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    Benchmarks hint at next-gen Ivy Bridge MacBook Pro, iMac

    Geekbench benchmarks that appear to be from unreleased versions of Apple's MacBook Pro and iMac computers have surfaced online and serve as compelling evidence of upcoming upgrades from the company.


    Scores for a MacBook Pro9,1 and an iMac13,2 were discovered by a MacRumors forum user on Sunday, as noted by the publication. Though it's possible the results were spoofed, the model numbers, if accurate, are higher than Apple's current-generation models.

    According to the benchmarks, the MacBookPro9,1 was running Max OS X 10.8 (Build 12A211), a build that has yet to be released to developers. The machine reportedly made use of a quad-core 2.70 GHz Core i7-3820QM processor and received a GeekBench score of 12,252. That compares to a score of around 10,500 for the Core i7-2860QM processor found in the current MacBook Pro.

    Benchmarks for the alleged iMac13,2 were posted a few days before the MacBook Pro results. The desktop was also powered by a quad-core i7 chip, though the model number was 3770 and the clock speed was 3.40 GHz. The operating system for the iMac was described as Mac OS X 10.8 (Build 12A2040), which may have been running an earlier build of Mac OS X 10.8 than that of the aforementioned MacBook Pro. The Geekbench score for the iMac came in at 12,183.







    The report also noted that the motherboard identifiers for both machines match up with Mac models discovered in the first developer preview of OS X 10.8.

    Geekbench has served as an accurate source of leaks in the past. In 2010, early benchmarks matched the eventual specifications of a MacBook Pro upgrade.

    In March, benchmarks reportedly for "Hackintosh" Ivy Bridge-powered computers appeared online. A 3.50GHz Core i7-3770K CPU running Mac OS X 10.7 was said to have received a score of 13,453.

    Chipmaker Intel officially launched its Ivy Bridge architecture late last month. Ahead of the release, CEO Paul Otellini indicated that the "bulk" of the first wave of chips would go to desktop computers. A second batch of Ivy Bridge processors bound for lightweight notebooks are scheduled to be released later this quarter.

    AppleInsider reported in February that, according to sources, Apple is readying upgrades to its MacBook Pro line that will draw from MacBook Air-style design choices, such as solid-state drives, omission of an optical drives and instant-on capabilities.

    "They're all going to look like MacBook Airs," the source said of the upcoming MacBook Pro models.

    Rumors have also suggested that Apple will release new iMacs in June or July. One report claimed last month that the new iMacs will feature anti-reflective displays.

    5-14-12

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    Mac-bound Retina displays will cost Apple a $92 premium from suppliers

    LCD screens capable of becoming Retina displays for Apple's next-generation Macs are currently available in the supply chain, but they come at a premium as high as $92 over regular screens.


    DisplaySearch Senior Analyst Richard Shim told CNet that super-high-resolution 13.3-inch and 15.4-inch screens are already available from LCD suppliers. But a Retina-quality screen for Apple's 15-inch MacBook Pro would cost $160 from suppliers, as opposed to $68 for current, standard-resolution screens.

    Similarly, with a 13.3-inch display, a Retina-caliber screen is $134, while the LCD panels Apple currently uses are estimated to cost $69.

    If Apple does in fact add Retina displays to its future Macs, as is expected, it's unknown whether the cost of these high-resolution screens would be passed on to the consumer. Apple upgraded its iPhone, iPod touch and iPad product lineups to Retina displays without increasing the price.

    The screens DisplaySearch says are available that would be ideal for Apple's next-generation MacBook Pros are a 15.4-inch panel with a resolution of 2,880 by 1,800 pixels, or 220 pixels per inch, and a 13.3-inch screen with a resolution of 2,560 by 1,600 pixels, or 227 pixels per inch. Each would add at least 100 pixels per inch to their respective MacBook Pro models.





    Numerous reports have indicated Apple will introduce new, thinner MacBook Pros at its annual Worldwide Developers Conference in June. Those new professional notebooks are expected to include Retina display-like screens that will be driven by Intel's latest-generation Ivy Bridge processors.

    The new MacBook Pros are expected to follow in the footsteps of Apple's popular MacBook Air lineup by ditching built-in optical drives and adding flash memory for faster performance and greater reliability.

    It has also been reported that Apple will update its all-in-one desktop line of iMacs at WWDC when it kicks off June 11. The new iMacs are also expected to have high-resolution Retina displays, but potential screens for the desktop were not highlighted by DisplaySearch.

    In addition, DisplaySearch did not specifically identify any potential Retina display LCDs for a 17-inch MacBook Pro. One prediction published in April suggested Apple would discontinue its 17-inch MacBook Pro, leaving only the 13- and 15-inch models.

    5-16-12

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    Retina MacBooks Mean More Manufacturing Costs For Apple

    Retina displays will be more expensive for Apple to put into new MacBook Pros.



    Apple’s upcoming lineup of MacBook Pros are expected to feature a slimmer design, Intel Ivy Bridge architecture and jaw-dropping ‘Retina’ displays. Like the last two iPhones and newest iPad, Apple’s new MacBook Pro and iMac models are supposed to flaunt a screen like you’ve never seen on a computer before. And if iOS device marketing is any indication, such a display will likely be the flagship feature in new Macs. Apple is expected to unveil the new MacBook Pros at WWDC next month, according to multiple reports.

    If the next MacBook Pro and iMac really do come outfitted with gorgeous Retina displays, then the new screens will cost Apple more to make.

    CNET passes along a note from DisplaySearch Senior Analyst Richard Shim saying that the displays Apple would likely use for super hi-res notebook screens are already available in the supply chain:

    “What’s clear is that Apple’s pushing it. They’re pushing panel makers to come out with higher resolution panels because they’ve created a market demand for it, starting with their phones, now going to their tablets,” Shim said. “Now what we’re seeing in the supply chain is that they’re going to move that to their notebooks, and it’s becoming a premium feature.”

    According to Shim, it would cost Apple about $160 to put a Retina-quality panel in a 15-inch MacBook Pro. Apple currently pays $68 per panel. A 13-inch panel would cost $134, while the current panel costs Apple $69.

    Apple already offers a higher-res display for the current 15-inch Pro that bumps up the resolution from 1440×900 to 1,680×1,050. The made-to-order upgrade costs $100 on Apple’s website.

    Here are the ‘Retina’ specs Shim thinks Apple will use:

    15.4-inch: 2,880 by 1,800 resolution. That’s 220 pixels per inch (PPI). By comparison, the current 15.4-inch MacBook Pro has a 1,440 by 900 pixel display and a PPI of 110.

    13.3-inch: 2,560 by 1,600 resolution with a PPI of 227. By comparison, the current 13.3-inch MacBook Air is 1,440 by 900 pixels, and has PPI of 127

    Interestingly, Shim did not say anything about the 17-inch MacBook Pro model. Cult of Mac has independently heard that Apple is focusing on the smaller end of its MacBook Pro lineup, so we wouldn’t be surprised if the 17-inch model falls by the wayside.

    It’s important to remember that Apple didn’t raise prices when transitioning to the Retina display in the iPhone 4 and third-gen iPad, but a $1,200 notebook is a totally different ballgame.

    Apple is a huge player in the supply chain, and the company has been known to negotiate seemingly-impossoble deals to secure components in bulk or at a cheaper price. We’ve reported before that the new MacBook Pros will not have optical drives, so Apple could cut manufacturing costs that way. It’s highly unlikely that customers will have to pay extra for something like a better screen. Heck, it’s not like Apple doesn’t have enough cash to float the bill.

    5-16-12

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