iOS 6 tips and tricks

This is a discussion on iOS 6 tips and tricks within the iOS Apps forums, part of the iPod, iPhone, iPad Forum category; The default font size for messages and texts on the iPhone is fairly small, and while it may look fine to many users, it’s simply ...

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  1. #161
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    Change the Font Size of Messages on the iPhone to be More Readable




    The default font size for messages and texts on the iPhone is fairly small, and while it may look fine to many users, it’s simply too tiny to be easily readable for others. iOS makes it easy to change the text size though, offering a wide range of options that are suitable for just about everyones visual preferences. We’re emphasizing the iPhone here, but this setting and adjustment is also available to iPod touch and iPad users.


    Adjusting the Messages text size in iOS is done as follows

    Open Settings and go to “General”
    Tap on “Accessibility” and then choose “Large Text”
    Select the desired font size from this menu: OFF is the default, 20pt, 24pt, 32pt, 40pt, 48pt, and 56pt




    The preview text alongside each option gives you a general idea of how things will look, but it’s really best to make a settings adjustment, then flip over to the Messages app and see how things look directly.

    Something to keep in mind is that not only does the size of text increase in the message body, but also in the individual message browser screen, and even the text-input box when entering or sending texts and imessages:





    Changing message text size in iOS 7 is handled slightly differently, where it isn’t labeled the same way as before but it does end up providing for more precise control of the resulting increase:

    Go to Settings, then go to General and “Text Size”
    Adjust the slider to accommodate your desired text size preference




    With both iOS 6 and iOS 7, increasing the font size setting here expands beyond Messages content, and it also boosts the text size in Mail app for email body and subjects, Calendars, Contacts, and Notes too. The result is a much more readable experience in places where it matters most, and if you ever find yourself squinting to read the small on screen words, just take a moment to increase the sizes here, it can make a big difference in usability.

    I have fairly decent eyesight and I find myself most comfortable with the 20pt font size setting on the iPhone, and for older folks and those with visual difficulties, I always opt for 24pt, 30pt, or higher. You will find that once you start approaching the 48pt and 56pt text sizes, on screen elements and reading gets very cramped on the iPhone and iPod touch screen, but the larger sizes look just fine on the iPad which just has more screen real estate to work with.

    By the way, if you also use Messages on the Mac too, you may wish to boost the text size there as well so that all messages are more legible, regardless of the platform you are reading them on.


    7-6-13

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  3. #162
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    Get started with AirPlay



    AirPlay is Apple’s technology for streaming audio or video over a local network. This Macworld video gives you a quick look at the most common AirPlay setups and how to configure and use them.


    Transcript

    AirPlay is Apple’s technology for streaming media over a local network. Specifically, it lets you stream audio from any Mac or iOS device to any AirPlay-enabled audio system, or video from an iOS device or recent Mac to an Apple TV. AirPlay works over any modern ethernet or Wi-Fi network. The sending and receiving devices just need to be compatible with AirPlay.

    Here’s a quick look at the most common AirPlay setups and how to configure them. (For a comprehensive look at setup and use, check out our full article on getting started with AirPlay.) I’m assuming here that your devices are already connected to a local network.


    Setting up your AirPlay devices

    Before you can use AirPlay, you need to configure your AirPlay receiver: a speaker or audio receiver with AirPlay built-in, an AirPort Express base station, or an Apple TV.

    Many recent AirPlay-enabled speakers are simple to set up. For Wi-Fi, just use your iOS device’s USB-sync cable to connect the speaker to your iPad, iPhone or iPod touch. A dialogue on the device’s screen asks if you want to share your network settings with the speaker. Tap Allow, and the speaker is automatically configured to join your network. Ethernet is even easier: you just connect an ethernet cable to the speaker.

    For an AirPort Express that’s already on your network, you launch AirPort Utility, select the Express and then click Edit. Next, click the AirPlay tab, check the Enable AirPlay box and give the Express a descriptive name; you can also enable an access password. Click Update to save your changes.

    To enable AirPlay on your Apple TV, navigate to the Settings screen, select AirPlay and then make sure that the AirPlay is set to On. For security, you can optionally configure either an onscreen code or a traditional password.

    (You’ll of course need to connect speakers or an audio system to the AirPort Express or Apple TV for audio, or a TV or home-theatre receiver to the Apple TV for video.)


    Using AirPlay for audio

    Streaming audio over AirPlay is easy. On your Mac, you can stream iTunes audio by clicking the AirPlay button next to the volume slider in iTunes, and then choosing the desired AirPort destination. To send audio to multiple AirPlay-equipped devices simultaneously, click Multiple and then select the speakers you want to stream to; you can control the volume level of each speaker independently in this menu.

    You’ll need third-party software to stream audio from a specific Mac app other than iTunes. Rogue Amoeba’s Airfoil for Mac lets you stream audio from any currently running app to the AirPlay destination(s) of your choosing.

    If you’re running OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, you can stream all of your Mac’s audio by opening the Sound pane of System Preferences, switching to the Output screen, and then selecting your AirPlay destination in the list. Alternatively, you can hold down the Option key and click the systemwide volume icon in the menu bar, then choose your AirPlay destination under Output Device.

    You have similar options for streaming audio from iOS devices. To stream all of your device’s audio, double-press the Home button to access the task switcher, and then swipe to the right until you reach the volume slider; next to the slider is the iOS AirPlay button. Tap it, and then tap the desired AirPlay destination.

    To stream audio from just a specific app, that app must provide an AirPlay-selection button within the app. If it does, just tap it to see the same list of all AirPlay receivers on your local network; tap one to stream to it. Note that unlike on a Mac, iOS can stream to only a single AirPlay destination at a time.


    Using AirPlay for video

    Streaming video from iOS to a recent Apple TV works much like streaming audio. To mirror a recent iOS device’s screen on your TV, again press the Home button to access the task switcher, and swipe to get to the AirPlay button. Tap the button, choose the desired Apple TV, and switch the Mirroring option to On.

    To stream from an individual app that supports AirPlay video, just find and tap the AirPlay button in the app, and then choose your Apple TV from the list that appears. (I can’t show you the procedure here, as I can’t record my iPad’s screen without mirroring it.)

    Streaming video from iTunes on a Mac is similarly simple. Just click the AirPlay button in the video-playback window, and choose an Apple TV.

    If you want to stream video that’s not in iTunes, you can use the third-party utility Beamer. Choose your Apple TV as the destination, drop any supported video file onto Beamer, and you’re done.

    Mirroring all your Mac’s video on your TV – meaning anything and everything on your Mac’s screen shows up on your TV, as well – works only under OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion on very recent Macs. There are two ways to configure AirPlay mirroring: in the Displays pane of System Preferences or using the AirPlay Mirroring menu. The latter shows up whenever OS X detects a compatible Apple TV on your local network. Choose your Apple TV to start mirroring. You can also tweak the output resolution to choose the best for your TV or the best for your Mac.

    (If you don’t have a Mac that supports AirPlay mirroring the third-party utility AirParrot gives you similar functionality.)


    Stopping the stream

    Whichever type of streaming you’re doing, with whichever device, you can stop streaming by using the same AirPlay control or menu through which you originally started streaming. Alternatively, if you’re streaming from a particular app, quitting that app usually stops streaming. When streaming to an Apple TV, you can also stop AirPlay streaming by pressing the Menu button on the Apple TV’s remote.





    7-6-13

    www.macworld.com

  4. #163
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    Cell Carriers May Sell Your Location & Browsing History, Here’s How to Opt Out



    Cellular carriers in the USA are looking to start selling customer usage data to third parties and marketers, according to TechCrunch. This is being done in an effort labeled as ‘personalization’ and using some other boring and friendly sounding descriptions. Though the information is supposedly aggregate and anonymous, it still may include fairly personal details like what apps you use, your location data, and web browsing history, and other bits of info that privacy conscious individuals probably don’t want to share with the outside world.

    Fortunately, it’s fairly easy for users to opt out of these efforts through the major US carriers, including AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, and T-Mobile:

    AT&T customers can opt out here
    Verizon customers can opt out by visiting this website and looking under “Manage Privacy Settings”, or by calling this phone number 1-800-333-9956
    Sprint customers can opt out here
    T-Mobile customers can adjust settings at this website, or call 1-800-937-8997, and opt out of individual cookies through this third party site

    In most cases it only takes a moment to opt-out, though you will have to log into your account and opt out per phone number, or call and speak with a representative and specifically ask not to be included in the data sharing. If you’re not too excited about the idea of your cell provider selling some of your personal data, even if anonymized, it’s probably worth spending the minute or so to opt out.


    7-7-13

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    Disable the Picture Frame Button from the iPad Lock Screen

    Though the iPad Picture Frame feature is nice, having it appear on the lock screen can be a problem. For one, it’s very easy to accidentally tap which is just frustrating, but perhaps more important is the potential privacy issues caused by Picture Frame defaulting to show the entire Photo app Camera Roll. This means that even with a lock screen passcode set, tapping that flower button may wind up displaying some pictures you don’t really want to share with the world.




    There are really three ways to manage this: by creating and setting a custom album specifically for the Picture Frame feature, keeping a watchful eye on the pictures stored on the iPad, or perhaps easiest, disabling the flower Picture Frame button from the lock screen entirely, which is what we’ll cover here.

    Open Settings and go to “General”, then choose “Passcode Lock” and enter the lock screen passcode if one is set
    Look under “Allow Access When Locked:” for “Picture Frame” and set that to OFF





    Going back to the lock screen, you will now find the flower button is removed, and you won’t be able to access the picture frame from the lock screen any longer. Instead, you will need to manually start a slideshow from the Photos app if you do want to turn the device into a picture frame or slide show.

    You probably noticed that you must have a passcode set and turned on in order to disable the picture frame. While that may be disappointing if you’re just wanting to turn off the flower button to stop accidentally tapping it, but for privacy reasons it makes a lot of sense, since obviously only a lock screen passcode is going to prevent someone from gaining access to the Photos app and the full camera roll anyway.


    7-16-13

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    How to Remove “Other” Data Stored on the iPhone, iPad, iPod touch

    Most iOS users encounter “Other” for the first time when they connect their iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch to a computer, where they’ll find it listed in the little iTunes usage bar graph. With everything else so well labeled, Other can be a bit of a mystery, particularly when it takes up a ton of storage in iOS.




    What is ‘Other’ space? It’s generally a combination of local caches from apps, browsers, mail, Messages, Reading List, saved games, app-specific documents and data, notes, and voice memos. Knowing this, it’s actually pretty easy to recover most of the space consumed in that category by targeting those things specifically.

    This guide will apply to all iOS devices, though the iPhone will likely benefit the most because of the Messages trick. Nonetheless, if Other is gigantic on an iPad or iPod touch, these methods will work there as well.


    Checking if “Other” Data is a Storage Problem

    The “Other” storage isn’t always a large problem, and many users can use iOS devices for years without ever finding it to be an issue that is consuming unnecessary storage. On the other hand, a very obvious symptom of an abnormally large “Other” space hog is a mysterious lack of available storage capacity on an iOS device, despite not having much music, movies, media, apps, or photos stored locally.

    If you don’t have such an obvious sign something is up, here’s how you can figure out if Other space may be too large on your device:

    Checking on the iPhone / iPad / iPod Touch

    Though there is no direct way to see “Other” space in iOS, you can get a rough idea by taking a peak at general space usage stats:

    Open Settings, go to “General”, then go to “Usage”
    Now look at sizes of “Available” vs “Used” at the top of the Storage screen, and compare that to the size of the apps you have installed. Just do some rough math in your head, and if there is a large discrepancy in space available vs space that is obviously used by apps, that’s probably the infamous “Other” taking up the extra storage.




    This method is obviously imprecise, so you can connect the iPad, iPhone, iPod touch a computer with iTunes to get the exact number.


    Checking Other from iTunes

    iTunes is where most people are first introduced to the mystery “Other” capacity, and it’s by far the most direct way to see how much stored data is labeled that way:

    Connect any iOS device to iTunes to see the yellow “Other” number




    If “Other” is under 1GB you probably don’t have much to concern yourself with, but if starts taking up several GB of storage on a 16GB device, it can be very annoying and that’s the type of capacity issue that we’ll focus on reclaiming here.

    Follow these tricks in descending order, unlike a lot of the other crud you’ll find out there, these actually work to recover space.


    1: Delete & Reinstall Apps with Bloated Local Data

    Apps are usually fairly small, but with continuous usage some of them will expand to fairly large sizes due to local caches, saved games, components, and whatever else they decide to keep around. Here’s how you can see which apps have a lot of stuff stored locally:

    Go to “Settings”, then “General” and look under “Usage”
    Look at the largest apps and compare the Documents & Data size to the actual app size, these are what you should focus on for removal and reinstallation
    Keep in mind that deleting apps and reinstalling them this way may cause you to lose local data, be it saved games, saved app caches, and certain app specific data and files, so you wouldn’t want to do this with apps that have locally stored data that is important to you.

    One example that is fairly inconsequential to delete and reinstall is the Instagram app. The app itself only takes up about 25MB, but it’s “Documents & Data” after being used for a few months can easily expand to be 10x-20x that size as image cache is kept locally.




    To recover that space from apps like this, simply delete them and then reinstall them from the App Store again.


    2: Remove Large Messages & Threads

    Believe it or not, all those iMessage and text message threads can take up a ton of storage space. This is particularly true with the iPhone, and to a lesser extent the iPad and iPod touch. This is particularly true for those who send and receive a lot of multimedia messages, be they shared photos, movies, animated gifs, or whatever else. As of now, all that stored message and media become listed as part of the “Other” space, and it’s not unusual for Messages to wind up taking up 1GB or more of space. The solution to this is easy, just delete message threads:

    Open Messages app, tap on “Edit”, then tap the red (-) button to delete an entire message thread
    Repeat as necessary

    If you’re looking to reclaim as much Other space as possible, clear out every message thread.




    This is much improved in iOS 7, because Messages becomes a listed item in the general Usage menu which lets you easily see just how much space all those saved threads are taking up.


    3: Clear Safari Cookies, Data, History

    Being the default browser of iOS, Safari is unlike other browser apps, which will list their caches and cookie data in the aforementioned “Documents & Data” section of app usage. This means you have to delete Safari specific data separately:

    Open Settings, then go to “Safari” and tap on “Clear Cookies, Data, History”




    The Safari caches usually aren’t too large, but clearing them out can make a noticeable impact on Other in some cases. Keep in mind that deleting cookies means you will lose saved web settings and logins on websites, so be prepared for that.


    4: Delete Voice Memos

    If you use the Voice Memos app frequently, all those voice notes can wind up taking up a lot of storage space as they are basically just audio files. These are easily deleted though:

    Open Voice Memos, tap on the memo to delete, then tap the red “Delete” button
    Repeat as necessary, aim for the longer voice memos for the biggest gains
    If you can’t part with some memos, consider trimming them down to the portions of the audio that matters most, this can help to reduce the space taken up by the individual memos.


    5: Restart the iPhone, iPad, iPod touch

    Once you’ve done the above steps, you should restart the iOS device so that it effectively recalculates the usage data. Connect it again to iTunes, or check the Usage stats again from Settings, and things should finally add up and that Other space should no longer be massive. If you do still see a large Other capacity, it may be due to a calculation error that can be resolved by forcing iTunes to re-sync and recalculate space use, but sometimes the only solution is to back up and then restore the device.


    6: “Other” Still Bloated? Backup & Restore

    If you have done all of the above and the Other space is still too large to make sense of, you may need to just backup and restore the device. This basically reinstalls iOS while preserving your data, and in the process it can clean out a lot of the junk that accumulated to create the humungous Other space. This can either be done with the assistance of a computer and iTunes, or entirely on the device itself with the help of iCloud. Here are the two basic steps and tutorials for each:

    Back up the iPhone either through iTunes or iCloud
    Restore the device from that backup
    Restoring can take a while making this a less than ideal solution, but if none of the above tricks worked then you will find restoring almost always does.




    Restoring from backups isn’t perfect though, particularly if the backups contain huge amounts of local data from apps, Messages, and other things that could have been cleaned up better using the tricks mentioned above. If you’ve restored and find the situation no better than before, a factory reset is often the only remaining solution.

    Enjoy your newfound space on that iOS device, and if you’re still struggling trying to find some available storage, check out these simple tips to free up a significant amount of storage space on any iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch.


    7-24-13

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    Work with a Broken Power Button on the iPhone / iPad Using an iOS Fix




    If you find yourself in a situation where the power button (the topmost hardware button) on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch is unresponsive, stuck, or no longer functioning, you can make due by using the Assistive Touch features of iOS. Intended as an Accessibility feature, Assistive Touch allows you to summon a virtual power button to perform all the necessary power functions, be it locking the screen or turning off the device. We’ll also cover two other helpful tips for users with malfunctioning power/lock buttons, including restarting the iOS device, and also, the ever-important powering it back on again if it has been turned off.


    Enable Assistive Touch to Gain Software Power Buttons

    Before going any further, you’ll want to enable Assistive Touch to gain access to the onscreen hardware buttons. The screenshots are for iOS 6 but the settings are identical in iOS 7:

    Open Settings then go to “General” followed by “Accessibility”
    Locate “Assistive Touch” and flip that to ON
    Tap and drag on the newly visible Assistive Touch virtual button and place it somewhere most appropriate for your usage (corners are often ideal)




    Now that Assistive Touch is enabled, you’ll find the little virtual button on your screen:





    This is what you’ll use to lock the screen, power off the device, take screen shots, and more. It also can function as a Home Button replacement in the event that hardware button has failed as well.


    How to Lock the iOS Screen with a Broken Power Button

    Tap on the Assistive Touch dot, then tap “Device” and tap “Lock Screen”




    On a side note, this is also a good time to set the Auto-Lock feature to be as aggressive as possible so that if you forget to do this, the screen will lock itself. That is accessible in Settings > General > Auto-Lock, and this will help battery drain by keeping the devices display off when it’s not in use.


    How to Turn Off an iOS Device Without a Power Button

    Tap on the Assistive Touch dot, then tap “Device” and then tap and hold on “Lock Screen” until the familiar “Slide to Power Off” screen toggle appears, which you can then slide to turn the device off as usual




    Heads up to Macworld for the tap-and-hold solution to turn the iOS device off, this was my biggest hangup after experiencing difficulties with the lock/power button on my iPhone 5 recently.


    How to Turn On an iPhone / iPad Without a Working Power Button

    Connect the iOS device to iTunes via USB cable to force the device to boot up
    Optionally, you can also just connect the iOS device to a USB wall charger, but you may find that if the device is low on battery, it may simply charge for a while rather than immediately booting up as it does through iTunes.





    This is arguably the most inconvenient part of not having a functioning power button, but it’s really not too bad.


    Taking Screen Shots with a Broken Power Button

    Tap on Assistive Touch, then tap on “Device” and tap on “More”
    Choose “Screenshot” to snap the screen as usual
    The Assistive Touch screen and options panel will not display in the screenshot.


    How to Reboot an iOS Device with a Broken Power Button

    Open Settings then go to “General” and “Reset”
    Tap on “Reset Network Settings”
    This one doesn’t require the usage of the Assistive Touch at all, and it’s faster than turning the device off, then plugging it in somewhere to turn it back on. The downside to using this trick is that you will lose network specific settings, which is typically just Wi-Fi passwords or static IP’s if you have such a thing set for a given network. There really isn’t a better solution though that is quick, can be done directly on the device itself, and does not depend on a USB charger though, making the network reset the only solution possible when on the go.

    Why do the power buttons fail or get stuck? Typically it’s the same reason that many home buttons fail also, whether that’s a result of extreme usage conditions, gunk buildup blocking it’s functionality, significant falls onto hard surfaces, prolonged contact with water or liquids, or, very rarely, a truly defective device. In many cases, a visit to an Apple Store will resolve the situation permanently and they’ll often swap out the device for a functioning one, or perform a free repair, particularly if the failure is not caused by user damage. In the meantime though, the Assistive Touch and Reset features can get you through a pinch situation, and even help to avoid a hefty repair bill if the failure does not end up being covered by AppleCare.


    7-30-13

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    Easily Transfer Voice Memos from iPhone to the Computer




    Voice Memos is that ever-useful app that lets you make a quick recording of a voice note, memo, record a conversation, or just generally replace one of those mini-tape recorders that many people use for recording notes while they’re working or driving.

    While there’s not much wrong with maintaining tons and tons of voice memos on the iPhone, eventually you may want to copy them over to a computer, either for archival and backup purposes, or just to alleviate some of that Other data that can build up over time as more stuff accumulates on the device. Regardless of how many recordings are stored on your iPhone, copying them over to a Mac or PC is actually pretty easy, and we’ll cover two different methods each of which has its own benefits.


    Transferring Voice Memos Through Email

    The simplest way to get a recorded Voice Memo over to a computer is to use the Share option directly within the Voice Memo app. This is ideal for sending over a single memo or a small group of recordings, but isn’t the best solution for copying large batches of recordings:

    Tap on any voice memo, then tap the “Share” button and choose “Email” (or Message to send it to a Mac)





    Yes it really is that simple to send a recorded memo over to yourself. Admittedly, email isn’t the ideal solution, and sending the voice memo to yourself through iMessage may be a better option for Mac users who have Messages configured in OS X.

    If you don’t have an internet or cellular connection available, the Sharing option won’t do you any good, but you can still copy Voice Memos from any iOS device to any computer using a third party tool, which we’ll cover next.


    Copying Voice Memos to a Computer with iExplorer

    If you have a bunch of voice memos you want copied to the computer, iExplorer is the way to go. iExplorer is a free app for Mac OS X and Windows that lets you browse through any iOS device treating it kind of like an FTP server as if it had a normally accessible file system. This makes it possible to directly copy files from the iPhone, voice memos included, which is great if you’re looking to copy a large group of voice recordings over since you won’t run into any of the email attachment size limitations, or the repetition of tapping that “Share” button and filling up an inbox used with the prior approach.

    Download iExplorer (free) and connect the iOS device to the computer via USB

    Look in iPhone > Media > Recordings and find the appropriate voice memo(s) to copy over based on the filename and date, or copy them all by selecting every .m4a file and dragging it to the computer





    Obviously the downside to this approach is that you must use a third party application in addition to a USB cable, but the plus side is that it works without an internet connection, and it’s much faster for copying large quantities of voice recordings over to a computer.

    Regardless of which method you use, once you get the voice memo onto the computer you’ll find the files are actually stored as m4a audio documents, the same audio file format that many songs are stored in, and a simple file extension change away from converting a recording into a ringtone if you’re into that kind of thing.


    7-30-13

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    Get Around the 5 Device Connection Limit on Wi-Fi Hotspot for iOS & Android



    The Wi-Fi Personal Hotspot feature available with just about every smartphone is incredibly useful, but most cell providers impose a cap on the number of devices that can connect to the wi-fi hotspot. Typically the connection limit provides for a maximum of 3 to 5 device connections, but if you find yourself in a situation where you need more than the maximum device allotment, you can use a workaround to bypass the hotspot connection limit.

    This trick will work with any cellular hotspot on iOS or Android and it should even work with the individual LTE hotspot modems that aren’t smartphones too. The only requirements are that you have the wi-fi hotspot service active on a smartphone, and that you have a computer (Mac OS X or Windows) with wi-fi, Bluetooth, and/or USB capable of connecting to that data hotspot.

    Enable the Personal Hotspot / Wi-Fi Hotspot feature as usual on the iPhone, iPad, or Android to begin sharing the devices data connection – you may need to contact your cellular provide to enable this and pay a separate fee
    Tether the iPhone / Android to a computer via USB or Bluetooth – this is important, a standard wi-fi connection is not going to work due to how Internet Sharing functions on the desktop side of things
    Set up Internet Sharing on that connected computer (here’s how in Mac OS X), using the recently connected tethered hotspot connection as the internet service to share
    Connect all devices to the computers newly shared internet connection rather than directly through Wi-Fi hotspot broadcast from the smartphone
    Admittedly, this is a bit quirky and it’s very much a workaround, but it does indeed work. You can now connect as many devices as you want to the internet, completely bypassing the carrier imposed limitations for tethering and Personal Hotspot.

    It’s very important to consider your allotted cellular bandwidth when using internet tethering, as data overage charges can be expensive and happen quickly. This becomes even more critical when you have multiple devices sharing the same cell connection, as data use adds up remarkably fast. You can take steps to reduce unnecessary data usage through Hotspot by turning off automatic updates, using Flash blockers, and temporarily disabling services that sync data through the cloud.


    7-30-13

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    Easily Use & Switch Between Multiple Gmail Accounts on iPhone & iPad with Gmail App



    If you have multiple Gmail accounts that you juggle between, rather than adding them all to the default iOS Mail app, do yourself a favor and grab Google’s official Gmail app for the iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. Not only is Gmail for iOS an excellent full-featured mobile email client, it also makes managing multiple accounts extremely simple. This helps to take the strain off your primary Mail app account for iOS by not cluttering it up with too many notifications and alerts, and works well in line with our general recommendation to separate email accounts with different apps to aid in handling the inevitable inbox overload we all suffer from.

    Setting up and using Gmail for iOS is easy, whether for a single account, or as we’ll focus on here, for managing multiple accounts and inboxes:

    If you don’t have it yet, get Gmail for iOS (free) for your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch
    Open the app and sign into any Gmail account to get started
    Go to the inbox screen either by swiping to the right or by tapping the list button in the upper left corner
    Tap the downward pointing arrow at the top of the screen, then tap “Add Account”
    Enter the additional gmail account information (or alternatively, tap “Create a Google Account” to set up a completely new address) and choose “Sign In”
    Repeat as necessary to add additional accounts




    That’s how easy it is to add multiple accounts, once you are finished you will find that switching between different mail accounts is equally as simple. Just swipe over to the mailbox screen, tap the down arrow again, and tap on the alternate account you want to flip over to:




    You can even set up notifications and alerts on an individual account basis by tapping the Gear icon and choosing whether to see Notifications for “All New Mail” or “None”. Choosing “None” is very helpful if you setup a separate junk mail catch-all account and don’t want to be alerted every time some new piece of rubbish mail piles into the inbox.

    There is likely a limitation on the total number of accounts to hold in the Gmail app, I added four without incident for this walkthrough. If you decide you no longer want a specific address associated with the Gmail app, removing a GMail account is also very simple, done by selecting that specific account and then choosing “Sign Out”.

    Yes, you can also add multiple accounts to the iOS default Mail app, but we generally recommend using the default Mail app for an account that is most relevant to the devices primary usage. For example, if your iPhone is your personal phone, set up your personal email address on the default iOS Mail app, and then use the Gmail app for handling additional accounts. Similarly, Gmail for iOS provides an excellent way to have access to separate personal email accounts on a primarily work-related iOS device, helping to avoid any unintentional crossover between work and personal mail when doing things like sharing photos, documents, web pages, or whatever else from an iPhone or iPad.



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  11. #170
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    Fetch Or Push? Set Your Email Accounts To Maximize Battery Life, Speed Of Delivery



    You have a couple of options when setting up your email accounts on an iPhone or iPad, Fetch and Push. While Push is only available to more modern email accounts like Gmail, most of us have at least one account that can utilize this email service.

    But what’s the difference, really? And how do you set it up on your iOS device? That’s why we’re here.

    First of all, the terms fetch and push refer to how your email gets to your iPhone or iPad. With fetch, your device connects to the internet, checks your email server for new emails, and then downloads them. With push, it’s the server that does the heavy lifting, notifying your email client when there’s new email to be downloaded.

    Fetch is typically set on a timed basis, while push happens in real time. Fetch will use your battery up faster, as it requires your device to check the email server, while push only needs to let the email server know where to send the notifications. If battery power is an issue, try to enable push on your iOS device, if available.

    Launch your Settings app with a tap, and then tap into Mail, Contacts, Calendars. Scroll down below the Accounts section, and tap the Fetch New Data section. Make sure Push is toggled to ON, and then tap each of your accounts below to set the schedule to Push, Fetch, or Manual.

    If you set Manual as your schedule, your email will only show up on your device when you launch your email client. This is ideal for those with limited bandwidth or battery life. If you set push on an email account that has the feature, you’ll get your email as it arrives at your email server in real time. This saves battery life, too, since the only activity happens when you actually get email, rather than on a set schedule.

    If you set your email schedule to fetch, scroll down to the section where you can set it to every 15 minutes, every 30 minutes, or hourly. This way, you can still get your email, but it will be on that specific schedule. You can also set the fetching schedule to manual, which will only go and get email when you launch your client.



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