iOS 6 tips and tricks

This is a discussion on iOS 6 tips and tricks within the iOS Apps forums, part of the iPod, iPhone, iPad Forum category; Calendar is one of the most useful features of the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, and many of us wind up managing our schedules entirely ...

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  1. #171
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    Use the iOS Calendar Smarter & Faster with These 5 Tips



    Calendar is one of the most useful features of the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, and many of us wind up managing our schedules entirely through the app. But even if you’re just a casual Calendar user, you’ll still get some great use out of these five tips aimed at improving the speed of your interactions with Calendar app. You’ll learn to quickly move appointment and event times, change the calendar associated with a specific event, create new events and appointments faster, quickly check for schedule conflicts, and to navigate around all of your Calendars faster than you thought possible.


    1: Move Event & Appointment Times the Fast Way

    Need to reschedule an appointment or event? Changing the time or date of an event can be done incredibly fast with a tap-and-hold function:

    Within Calendars app, tap on the date with the event you wish to quickly change the time for
    Tap and hold on the event itself, then drag the event up or down to move times, or drag the event to the left or right to change days




    Moving on the hourly timeline jumps in 15 minute intervals. And yes, this works with invitations as well.


    2: Quickly Change an Events Associated Calendar in iOS

    Need to change an appointment or events associated calendar on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch? Rather than deleting the event and adding a new one in the other calendar, just make a quick adjustment for the event itself to relocate it:

    Launch Calendars and then tap on the event you wish to change calendars for
    Tap “Edit” and then tap on “Calendar”
    Select the new calendar to reassign the event to, and then tap on “Done”




    The change will carry across to all of your iCloud equipped devices, be it an iPhone, iPad, or Mac, along with any iCloud-specific shared calendars.

    This is particularly useful if you accidentally placed an event or appointment into the wrong calendar (say, in Home when it should be filed under Work) which is easy to do when creating events and reminders through Siri commands since Siri will automatically choose the default calendar option for any new event.


    3: Create New Events & Appointments from Emails & Check for Schedule Conflicts

    You can instantly create a new event or appointment directly from any email, this is by far one of the most useful yet overlooked tricks for iOS Calendar (and Mail for that matter):

    Open any email message with a date and time in the message, then tap and hold on the time and choose “Create Event”
    Wondering if there may be a scheduling conflict with a particular date and time mentioned in an email? Reveal that precise time and date in the Calendar app to see if there is any overlapping appointment, or if an event is too nearby to work out:

    Tap and hold the date in an email, then choose “Show in Calendar” to quickly look for conflicts




    4: Set a New Appointment with Siri

    Rather than launching Calendar app and adding a new event, why not turn to Siri to create the appointment for you?

    Summon Siri and say “Create appointment at [time] on [date] for [purpose]“
    For example, you can ask Siri to “create an appointment at 2:15pm on August 12th for lunch meeting” and Siri will pick up the date, time, and purpose of the event, showing it back to you and asking for you to confirm the date.




    Using Siri also provides the wonderful benefit of being able to set appointments largely hands-free and with spending minimal time looking at the screen, which is really useful for situations where your hands are busy doing other things.


    5: Navigate Between Days, Months, and Years at Lightning Speed

    Stop repeatedly tapping on the next or back arrows to jump forward a month or two, because there’s a much faster way that rips through the days, months, and years at lightning speed, all you need to do is:

    Tap and hold on the Forward or Back arrows to fast navigate




    The longer you hold the arrow, the faster the navigation moves, which makes this so much faster than tapping the forward/back buttons constantly. This really is the fastest way to jump around the Calendar app.



    8-6-13

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  3. #172
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    How-to: Strengthen your iOS security with a multi-numeric passcode

    Num pad with secure passcode



    While many of us know about and use the simple four digit passcode or more complex alphanumeric passcode to secure the data on our iOS devices, I recently discovered an interesting option built right into the system that I find to be more secure than a simple passcode and more convenient than an alphanumeric passcode.

    As mentioned in a recent episode of the Mac Power Users podcast, you can make your passcode more complex without complicating it by using more than 4 digits without involving letters and still using the num pad.

    While a simple passcode is a 4 digit number, turning off simple passcode and setting up a complex passcode using on numbers allows you to benefit from the ease of use of the lockscreen numpad while having more security than a simple 4 digit passcode.

    Setting this up is almost exactly like setting up the default passcode. Simply navigate to Settings > General > Passcode Lock, then be sure to set the Simple Passcode switch to OFF. Now tap Turn Passcode On and your keyboard will appear with letters, but choose the numeric view and enter the multi numeric passcode of your choice.

    You will need to verify your passcode, then depending on how soon you have your device set to require passcode entry, it should immediately be activated.

    You could even opt to use more digits (or as few as a single digit for more added convenience), but personally I find 6 digits to be the secure sweet spot.

    While 4 digit passcodes are plenty secure and certainly more secure than no passcode, using the complex passcode option leaves intruders clueless as to how many digits to even guess adding an extra layer of security without having to fiddle with the alphabetical keyboard.



    8-10-13

    9to5mac.com

  4. #173
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    Delete Email Faster in iOS Mail App with a Swipe Gesture



    Deleting mail from the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch is a little more cumbersome than it should be, but it doesn’t have to be that way. By making a quick settings change, we can turn the existing “Archive” function and swipe gesture into a “Delete” button and gesture instead. This also carries over to the “Edit” options to more easily bulk delete email messages from the iOS Mail app. Here’s how to make this change:

    Open “Settings” and go to “Mail, Contacts, Calendars”
    Tap on the email account you use (i.e.: Gmail)
    Look for “Archive Messages” and flip that to OFF
    Exit out of Settings and return to Mail




    Now to access the quick Delete button, you just need to swipe from right to left on any Mail message within mailbox, where the “Archive” option has become “Delete”.




    Additionally, you can bulk delete emails this way rather than using the move-to-trash trick for batch deleting, to do that you just need to tap “Edit” and select the group to trash.




    This swipe-to-delete trick is used in many other places throughout iOS, including phone calls, music, podcasts, and elsewhere. The feature is useful enough that it’s the new default option in iOS 7, making the settings change unnecessary for users of the latest iOS version. Instead, iOS 7 defaults to turning the “Archive” button into a “Trash” option instead when you swipe, like so:




    Choosing the “More” option continues to reveal “Archive” and other options, however.

    Check out some more great Mail app tips for iOS.


    8-13-13

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    Fact or fiction: Nine iPhone and iPad battery-saving techniques



    iPads and iPhones make great travel companions. These devices offer quick access to step-by-step directions, public transit information, email on the go and restaurant recommendations – and as a result, they tend to spend more time in our hands than in our pockets or bags. But what happens when your traveling pal’s batteries begin to run low and you’re nowhere near a charger? Well, they say knowledge is power, so lets get charged up by separating fact from fiction on the subject of how to save iOS’s devices’ battery life.

    To get to the truth about nine commonly held ideas on battery power conservation, the Macworld Lab grabbed a fourth-generation iPad and an iPhone 5 and started charging, draining and timing different tasks and scenarios. What we discovered can help you and your iOS device get through your next trip without running out of juice.


    1. ‘Screen brightness affects battery life.’




    Heck yeah, it does. Screen brightness was the single most significant contributor to battery depletion that we found. At full brightness and in Airplane mode, our iPhone 5 lasted 6 hours, 21 minutes while playing 720p video from a movie file. When we set the screen to half brightness, the phone lasted 9 hours, 48 minutes – that’s 3 hours, 27 minutes longer than the battery lasted with the screen set to full brightness. In similar video tests, our iPad’s battery lasted twice as long when set to half brightness as when set to full. To change your screen’s brightness, tap Settings, tap Brightness & Wallpaper and then adjust the Brightness slider.


    2. ‘AirPlay streaming from my device to a TV will quickly drain my battery.’




    You might think that accessing a movie file on your iOS device’s internal flash storage and then streaming it to an AirPlay device takes a toll on battery life, but it didn’t in our tests. Our iPad streamed high-definition video to an AppleTV-connected Sony Bravia for a whopping 13 hours, 45 minutes. And after all that time, it still wasn’t close to running out of steam: When we stopped the test (to, you know, go home and see our families and stuff), the iPad’s battery still had 82 percent of its capacity.


    3. ‘Using iTunes Home Sharing to stream video from a Mac to my iOS device drains my battery faster than watching a movie already on my iPad.’




    Reversing the direction of the signal, playing a movie from a computer on our Wi-Fi network on the iPad took much more energy, mainly due to the demands of the iPad screen. Set to full brightness, the iPad managed to play 5 hours, 34 minutes of video – 50 minutes less than it delivered when the video was playing from a file stored on the device itself.


    4. ‘Battery utilities help increase an iPhone or iPad’s battery life.’




    The iOS App Store is chock-full of utilities that claim to help boost your battery life. We looked at several battery apps for iOS, including Beijing Kingsoft Internet Security Software’s free Battery Doctor, Philips’s free BatterySense, and Appsware’s free Sys Activity Manager Lite. Most provide a similar set of data about your iPad or iPhone’s battery, including an estimate of the remaining battery life under current conditions, and estimates based on your turning off Wi-Fi or ceasing to surf the web. Most of these apps also offer tips for getting the most out of each charging cycle, though the tips seem to come from Apple’s own website. So while the apps we looked at don’t do anything themselves to prolong battery life, they supply valuable information that might help you do so.


    5. ‘Calibrating my battery will help preserve battery life.’




    As you leave the house, you check your phone and see that you have 4 hours of battery life remaining – but 3 hours later, you run out of juice. If this has happened to you, your iPhone or iPad might need a battery calibration. Apple recommends that you periodically drain your iPhone or iPad’s battery completely and then charge it until it’s completely full. This process, called calibration, helps your device estimate its remaining battery life more accurately. Calibrating your battery will ensure that you know when to charge your battery, but it doesn’t make your battery last longer.


    6. ‘Turning off equalization during audio playback will increase battery life.’




    We found this tip on Apple’s website, and a few battery utilities offer the same advice. To test its validity, we took a fully charged iPad and looped an audio playlist with equalization on and off. (To adjust equalization on your iOS device, tap Settings, tap Music, tap EQ, and choose a setting.) After 26 hours, 41 minutes, the battery of the iPad without equalization had dropped to 84 percent. When we ran the same test with equalization on and used the iPad’s Hip Hop setting, the iPad battery was still at 85 percent of its capacity when the test was over. So in our tests, equalization had no significant effect on battery life.


    7. ‘A battery pack will help my phone last longer.’




    Apple – and other portable device manufacturers – must find a balance between a product’s weight, size, and aesthetics and its battery life. Apple could make an ‘iPhone MAXI’ that was five centimetres thick, weighed a kilogram, and might be able to play back 20 hours of video; but the phone’s heft and bulk would probably make it fatally unpopular.

    On the other hand, when you temporarily need a little extra battery capacity, you can turn to a host of third-party companies whose cases, while increasing your phone’s weight and bulk, also extend its battery life and protect its screen from damage during a fall. One such case, the Mophie Juice Pack Plus (4.5 of 5 rating), which contains a 2100-mAh built-in battery, helped our iPhone 5 play almost exactly twice as much local video at full brightness as the iPhone could play on its own.


    8. ‘Maps and directions can seriously drain an iOS device’s battery.’




    We used iOS’s Maps app during our commute from our home to our son’s holiday camp (about 40 kilometres away) and then to work. This test was difficult for the app to handle, for a couple of reasons. First, the app was trying to give us driving directions while we was riding a train. As a result, it continually had to recalculate our route based on the streets nearby. Second, our train passed through a few tunnels along the route, so our iPhone had to search for GPS while switching from tower to tower. Our commute included a 3.8km drive, a 2.4km mile walk, and 55 minutes of train commuting. All told, the trip took us almost exactly 2 hours and ate up 51 percent of the iPhone’s battery capacity. Over the same route, with Location Services on, but not intentionally in use, the battery expended just 1 percent of its capacity.


    9. ‘Airplane mode saves battery life.’




    Aside from keeping the flight crew happy and their instruments interference-free, Airplane mode can help to preserve your device’s battery life. That one little setting turns off multiple wireless features, including Wi-Fi, cellular antenna, GPS, Bluetooth and location services. With Airplane mode enabled, we squeezed an extra 30 minutes of video playback from our iPhone 5 – going from 5 hours, 54 minutes with Airplane mode off to 6 hours, 21 minutes with Airplane mode enabled.




    8-16-13

    www.macworld.com

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    Use iPhone & Maps to Find Where You Parked the Car



    Visiting a new city, or maybe just a part of town you’re unfamiliar with? If you’re concerned you may forget where you parked your car (or bike, mule, horse, chariot, whatever), just pull out your iPhone at that location and use the Maps app to save the location. This simple trick means you’ll never forget where you have parked ever again, even if you’re in a place you have never been before. Here’s all you need to do:

    Park your car (or transportation) then immediately open Maps and tap the ‘locate’ button (it looks like an arrow) to have the Maps app center on your current location
    Now tap and hold on the screen to drop a location pin – sometimes it works better to tap and hold right next to the active location blue dot, dropping a pin rather than selecting the location




    That’s it. Now go about your business as usual, be it in a foreign city or a familiar one, and never be concerned about getting lost or forgetting where you parked again. Once you need to get back to your transportation, just relaunch the Maps app and zoom out until you see the pin on the map again, which you just need to walk to. Nice huh?

    Relocating your car/mule/bike at the pinned location is often made easier by orientating the maps app so that it points to the direction you are physically facing. That is done just by tapping on the arrow button again so that maps orients with you, rather than to the default directional setting of pointing north and south.




    This trick works in both Google Maps and Apple Maps apps in the same way, as dropping pins and the accompanying relocation services work the same in either app. If the location you’re visiting or parked at has poor cellular reception, using Google Maps may be a better choice because of it’s offline caching feature.




    This trick is incredibly helpful when visiting cities and regions you are unfamiliar with, and you’ll never have to worry about finding the proper parking garage or train stop again.




    8-20-13

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    Protect Your Privacy – Clear Cache Files, Browsing History, And Cookies From Chrome



    Google’s Chrome for iOS is a heck of a browser on iOS, and a great alternative to using Safari, except for the fact that it’s not quite as integrated into the experience as Safari is.

    Because of that, if you use Chrome and want to clear out your browser data to keep others from checking out what you’ve been doing on the web, you won’t be able to do so in the official Settings app like you can with Safari data.

    Here’s how to clear your cache files, browsing history, and any cookies from Chrome in iOS.

    Launch Chrome, and then tap on the settings icon, which looks like three horizontal lines stacked vertically, in the upper right of the browser screen. Tap on Settings, which is near the bottom of the resulting menu, and then tap on Privacy.

    Now, you can just Clear Browsing History, just Clear Cache, or just Clear Cookies and Site Data. Tap the respective button and you’ll get a confirmation dialog. Tap Clear to make it happen, or Cancel to do the opposite.

    If you want to clear all these things in one fell swoop, hit the Clear All button there at the end of the list of choices. You can also clear all your saved passwords and bookmarks at the same time, if that’s something you want to do.

    When you’re finished protecting the world from your web habits, hit the blue Done button in the upper right, and go back to the hamster videos.

    Clearing Chrome Browser Data in iOS:

    Open the Chrome app and tap on the menu button, which looks a bit like this: [=]
    Navigate down and tap on “Settings”, then tap on “Privacy”
    Tap on “Clear All”, or optionally, tap the individual options to “Clear Browsing History”, “Clear Cache”, or “Clear Cookies, Site Data”
    Optionally, you may wish to remove any saved login details and passwords by tapping on “Clear Saved Passwords” at the same settings screen.
    Tap “Done” when finished to be back in the standard Chrome browser as usual.




    8-21-13

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    Unlock an iOS Device Directly from an External Keyboard




    Did you know that you can unlock an iOS device using an external keyboard, without ever having to touch the screen or hardware buttons on the device itself? There really isn’t a whole lot to this, the only requirement is that you have an external keyboard in use with an iOS device that has the lock screen enabled, be it an iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch. Then all you need to do is hit any key on the external keyboard to summon the lock screen and enter the passcode – no touching, tapping, or swiping of the screen is required, and you don’t need to wake up the iOS device by pressing any of its hardware buttons either.




    If you don’t have any screen passcode set, the device will immediately unlock and jump to the home screen of app icons instead.

    This is a great trick to use in addition to the keyboard navigation shortcuts for those who use external keyboards with the iPad, be it a complete keyboard case or just a generic Bluetooth keyboard that has been synced for use with the device. Not only is it more convenient to just tap a button on the keyboard to unlock the device, but it’s also much faster for typing in the more secure complex passcodes, which are a notorious pain to type out through the different layers of the on-screen touch keyboard.




    8-23-13

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    Hide Email Previews from the Lock Screen of iPhone, iPad, iPod touch



    New email arrivals display a small preview of the message itself on the lock screen of iOS devices, which shows the sender, the subject, and part of the actual email message body. Because emails can contain some very private and/or personal details, you may wish to hide those email message previews from showing up on the lock screen completely.

    This will not completely prevent email notifications from appearing on the lock screen or Notification Center of iOS devices though (you can do that too, if you prefer), instead this just adds a nice layer of privacy by not showing the email preview. You’ll still be able to quickly tell that you have a new message and you’ll continue to see the sender of the message, but onlookers will no longer get a preview of the message subject or body content if they happen to see the lock screen of your iPhone, iPod, or iPad.


    Hide Email Message Previews from the Lock Screen of iOS

    This setting is the same on iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and all versions of iOS:

    Open Settings and head to “Notifications”
    Choose “Mail” then select the mail account to adjust the previews for
    Flip the switch for “Show Preview” to OFF
    Exit out of Settings




    With the mail preview turned off, only the sender will be revealed, and all subjects and message body previews will be replaced with a simple “Mail message” text.



    Here is what this looks like side-by-side, with the default option showing a complete email preview of the sender, subject, and the first part of the email itself, versus the much more private “Mail message” summary:




    You can do this for iMessages and text messages too, which is also recommended if you are looking to bring some additional privacy to your locked iOS devices.




    8-27-13

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    How to Sync Gmail / Google Contacts with iOS on iPhone, iPad, & iPod touch



    You can easily configure Google / Gmail contacts to sync with an iOS device like an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. This transfers all Google Contact details onto the iOS device, in addition to keeping all contacts in sync, meaning any changes made in one service will carry over to the other nearly instantaneously. This functions much like how iCloud syncs contacts between Apple devices, except it offers the ability to sync across platforms and between Apple and Google services.

    This is very easy to setup but before beginning you should take a moment to back up your iPhone contacts. You can do that either with iTunes, iCloud, or by exporting them from the web, and doing so insures that you will have a proper copy intact in the event something does go awry with the sync setup procedure. It’s fairly unlikely something will go wrong, but it’s always better to be safe than sorry.


    Set Up Google/Gmail Contact Syncing with iOS

    Configuration is the same on any iOS device or OS version. The included screenshots demonstrate the setup with iOS 7 with an iPhone:

    Open Settings in iOS, then go to “Mail, Contacts, Calendars”
    Choose “Add Account” and scroll down to select “Other”




    Under “Contacts”, select the “Add CardDAV Account” option
    Fill in the details for your Google account to sync contacts with:

    Server: google.com
    User Name: (your user name)
    Password: (your password)
    Description: Google Contacts


    Choose “Next” to import and sync Google contacts to iOS



    If you have a huge contacts list stored with Google it may take a moment to sync. Launch the “Contacts” to confirm that your Google/Gmail contacts are now on the iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch.

    CardDAV is excellent and syncs both ways, meaning if you make an edit or adjustment on your iOS device, it will sync back to Google and Gmail, and similarly, if you make a change or add a new contact from Google’s services, it will sync back to the iOS device. This is done entirely outside of Apple’s iCloud and handled by Google instead. This makes it an excellent choice for users who split smartphone usage time between Android and iPhones, and it also happens to be the easiest way to migrate contacts from one device platform to another if you happen to be making a more permanent switch.

    Mac users can also sync the OS X Contacts (Address Book) app with Google Contacts by following these instructions. Doing so will insure that all Google contact details are in sync between the desktop OS X, mobile iOS, web Gmail, and Android worlds.




    8-27-13

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    See What Processes Are Running in the Background of iOS

    iOS does not have an Activity Monitor or task manager the way that desktop Macs do within OS X, but if you’d like to see what apps and processes are running in the background of an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, you can do so using a few different methods. For most users, simply showing the multitasking bar is sufficient, but the curious can also reveal system-level processes using alternate methods with a third party app or, for users who have jailbroken their devices, the command line.


    1: The Basic iOS Task Manager

    Just about every iOS user is probably aware of the task manager by now, which is accessed by double-clicking the Home button. The row of icons across the bottom show what apps are running in the background, and you can flip left or right to see more of them.





    The task manager only shows apps though, and if you were hoping for something a bit more specific or technical, you’ll need to turn to another solution from a third party.


    2: Use a Process App like DeviceStats

    DeviceStats is a free third party app that may not be the prettiest thing in the world, but it works to show you which processes are actively running in the background of an iOS device, including daemons and background tasks.

    Grab DeviceStats from the App Store

    Launching DeviceStats on an iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch will show a variety of tabs and options, but what we’re interested in is the “Processes” tab, which will also have a red badge on it to indicate the total number of processes running.





    Scrolling through the list should reveal some familiar names of apps that you have open, things like Camera, Calculator, Videos, Photos, Preferences, Music, etc, and there will also be many tasks shown that are background processes, system tasks, and daemons.

    Nothing listed within DeviceStats is directly actionable through the app itself, meaning that even if you identify a process you can’t really do anything about it unless it’s a standard app. Standard apps can be quit as usual, or killed (forcibly quit) through direct measures. There is no way to kill or quit out of background daemons and tasks running within iOS, however.


    3: Using ‘top’ or ‘ps aux’ from the Command Line – Jailbreak Only

    Users who have jailbroken their iOS devices can access the command line directly, either by using an app like MobileTerminal or by connecting directly to the device through SSH.

    Once connected through the command line, you can use the ‘top’ or ‘ps aux’ command to see all active processes. “top” will provide a live updated list of processes, whereas ‘ps aux’ will print a snapshot of all processes and daemons, but not update any live CPU or memory usage. Processes that have been identified by ps or top can also be killed directly through the command line, but that may have unintended consequences for the iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch, and cause it to freeze up or crash, requiring a device reboot. Again, this is only accessible through jailbroken devices, which makes this option fairly limited.





    8-30-13

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