iOS 6 tips and tricks

This is a discussion on iOS 6 tips and tricks within the iOS Apps forums, part of the iPod, iPhone, iPad Forum category; If you’ve sent emails out with Siri before, you have probably noticed that Siri will often respond to the initial email request with an inquiry ...

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    Write & Send a Complete Email with Siri Faster Than Ever



    If you’ve sent emails out with Siri before, you have probably noticed that Siri will often respond to the initial email request with an inquiry about what the mail subject or body should contain, making you respond with another phrase and continue a back-and-forth dialog with Siri until the to, subject, and message fields are completed. There’s certainly nothing wrong with that approach, but you can write complete emails with Siri much faster by using certain keywords in your speech commands.

    The important keywords to use for complete mail messages are: “to”, “about”, and “and say”, and they must be used in a command format like so:

    send email to [recipient] about [subject] and say [email body]

    For example, to send a complete email addressed to “Danny DeVito” with the subject of “Taco Carts” and the body message of “I found the best taco cart ever” you would use a complete phrase with Siri like that shown below. The important keywords have been placed in bold to emphasize their placement in relation to the command:

    Send an email to Danny Devito about Taco Carts, and say I found the best taco cart ever




    Siri will write out the email as usual, but rather than requesting a body or subject from you again, it will fill everything in automatically, with the mail message immediately ready to send out. Siri will finish by asking if the message is ready to send, you can simply say “Yes” or tap the “Send” command on screen yourself.

    This is significantly faster than the question and answer method that goes along with the standard “email name” command, give it a try with Siri yourself.

    12-30-12

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    The Top iOS, iPhone, and iPad Tip Collections of 2012



    2012 is at it’s end, and just like with our favorite Mac tip collections of the year, OSXDaily.com is looking back and gathering some of the most useful multi-trick collection posts for iOS, iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch too. Again, we are aiming to give you the absolute most bang for your reading buck here by focusing on our favorite multiple tip roundup posts and so we’re skipping the single walkthroughs and guides that we post every day. Read through them all and you’ll be mastering iOS with must-know tips, typing tricks, genuinely useful Siri commands, better iPhone macro photography, faster website access, and much more.

    14 Must-Know Tips & Tricks for iPad

    These usability tricks will help you get the absolute most out of your iPad.

    6 Tips for Freeing Up Storage Space in iOS

    Because of their smaller storage capacity, it’s easy to run out of storage on an iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. Spend a few minutes with these tips though and you’ll be freeing up tons of space in iOS in no time at all.

    6 Tips for Taking Better Macro Photos with iPhone

    Improve your iPhone photography skills by learning how to take better close-up macro shots with the camera.

    5 Tricks for Taking Panoramic Pictures with iPhone

    Panorama Mode is a fantastic feature available to the latest iPhones, and you can learn to take panoramic photos the right way with these tricks.

    8 Typing Tips for iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch

    Typing on the touch screen keyboards can be challenging, but you can type faster by using a variety of smart tricks for the iOS virtual keyboards

    6 Tips to Improve Typing on the iPad

    Speaking of typing in iOS, this a collection of ways that should improve your typing specifically for the iPad

    7 Genuinely Great Uses for Siri

    Siri is incredibly useful and can perform a lot more tasks than you may realize. If you aren’t using the iOS virtual voice assistant there is no better time to get started, you’ll be making hands-free phone calls, checking and replying to emails, getting movie times, and much more.

    10 Tips to Reduce iPhone & iPad Personal Hotspot Data Use

    The iPhone and iPad can both share their cellular internet connections and serve as a personal wi-fi router, but before you setup Personal Hotspot, consider these tips that can help you reduce your data usage so you can avoid costly overage fees.

    3 Best Places to Sell Your Old iPhone

    Did you get a new iPhone this year? If you have an old iPhone laying about, here are the three best places to sell it, letting you get the most cash for your old device. This is geared for iPhones, but it’ll pertain to iPads and iPods too…

    2 Ways to Listen to Podcasts with Music App Again

    The iOS Music app is often a better choice for listening to podcasts because it’s faster on many devices, and here are some simple ways to do that again after iOS 6.

    2 Super Simple Tips to Get to Websites Faster in iOS

    Sometimes the simplest tips are the most used, and these two are as easy as pie while letting you jump to websites faster than ever on an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch.


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    Set a Unique Alert Tone for New Mail Messages from VIP List in iOS



    Managing slews of email can be one of the most challenging and time consuming parts of ones day, but with the help of VIP lists in iOS and OS X you can help to weed through some of the nonsense by simply having defined persons get precedent over others. On the desktop side of things, we’ve discussed using VIP in OS X’s Mail app before, including having the new mail notification and alert only notify you when a VIP email has come through, and you can do something quite similar on the mobile side of things too with iOS. By setting a custom Alert tone for VIP lists, you’ll know by sound alone if a message is important enough to warrant a quick response, before you even look at your inbox.

    Open Settings and choose “Notifications”
    Select “Mail” then select “VIP”
    Scroll down and tap on “New Mail Sound”, then navigate to whichever sound effect you want to be unique to those contained within VIP lists




    The key here is to set a mail sound that is different, the default is “ding” so choose something else. You can select any of your custom text and ring tones too, but for Mail alerts, the shorter the sound the better, so you may want to make one specifically for this purpose that’s around 0.5 seconds long if the default choices aren’t too your liking.

    Exit out of Settings, and the next time you get an email on the iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch from someone you have marked as VIP, you will hear the new unique notification alert sound, thereby knowing it’s important.

    If you haven’t done so yet, you can mark people as VIP easily in either iOS by tapping on a contact and choosing “Add to VIP”, or in OS X by tapping the star next to the contacts name. Assuming you have mail syncing with iCloud turned on, one marked on the desktop will carry over to your mobile iOS device, and vice versa.

    VIP is a big help for managing your primary account, but another worthwhile approach is to separate junk mail accounts from work and personal accounts by using different apps with different email addresses on the iPhone, that way your primary Mail apps inbox isn’t going to be overwhelmed with the unimportant stuff that you have to bulk delete constantly, and you’ll be able to separate inbox expectations just by launching different apps.

    1-2-13

    osxdaily.com

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    How to Set Up & Use the iPad Clock App in iOS 6

    When the first iPad was put on sale back in 2010, we certainly were thrilled, and we delighted in exploring all the new features of this wonderful new device from the future. For those of us already familiar with the iOS interface and apps on iPhone and iPod touch, we soon came to realize that some apps were strangely missing on iPad. For me and many others, the fact that the Stocks, Weather, Clock, and Calculator apps were MIA was troubling. We had to go off and find decent third-party replacement apps providing the functionalities we had come to rely on.

    What's behind Apple's reasoning for giving the ax to these simple, but useful apps? Who knows why Apple does what it does; I won't speculate. Nevertheless, with the introduction of iOS 6, Apple threw us a bone and gace us a new Clock app for our iPads. Let's jump right in and look at our shiny new timekeeper and what it can do.

    In keeping with Apple's tradition of providing stock apps that are simple in functionality yet abundant in style, the new iPad clock app is visually stunning while providing basic time-keeping features. In fact, the beautiful clock-face that Apple chose was identical to the iconic – and trademarked – clock design used by the Swiss Federal Railway. Apple will be paying them $21 million. Which reminds me – next time I visit Switzerland, I'm definitely checking out their shiny, new trains...


    Comparing the clock-face used by the Swiss Federal Railway and the clock design used by Apple



    The Clock app consists of four modules – similar to the Clock app present all-along on iPhone and iPod touch – World Clock, Alarm, Stopwatch, and Timer. Each is accessible by tapping the appropriate tab at the bottom of the open Clock app.

    Each of the four modules' displays take advantage of the iPad screen real estate, providing crisp, clear and large time functions visible even from across a large room.

    The World Clock Module

    The main window shows the stunning aforementioned clock-face. As we'll soon see, the clock displayed will show one of several times based on world cities that you can choose. Initially, this clock also displays the current temperature at that location. By tapping anywhere, only the clock-face shows for a clutter-free view. The background will either be white or black indicating day- or night-time. The dots at the bottom, similar in function to other iOS apps, indicate the number of other "pages" of clocks – one for each city clock configured. Tap on the dots or simply swipe left or right to peruse the individual clocks.


    Tapping on the World Clock button will allow you to see and edit all your city clocks



    By tapping on the arrow/button called "World Clock" at the top-left, you are taken to a high-altitude view of the world cities you have configured. Your cities, along with local weather condition icons, are overlaid on top of a world map projection. This map comes complete with a real-time terminator delineating day and night as well as general time zone indicators.

    You can configure up to six world clocks, all running simultaneously. When first launching the Clock app, you are given a few pre-configured clocks (including the one showing the obligatory Cupertino time) plus a blank "Add" placeholder for you to configure a new clock. Tapping on this will bring up a pre-built list of cities around the globe for you to select. There is a search bar, but that is only for searching for cities/countries already on the list. Unfortunately, the ability to search for any location (as can be done in the OS X Date and Time system preference) is not available. Hopefully, some day, but for now simply choose the city in the list, and your new clock is set for that time zone.

    A side note: I was trying to figure out how this list of cities was put together at Apple. Again, who knows why they do the things they do? This is an odd assortment to set your clocks to. There are numerous major cities, of course, but there are also many smaller communities I never heard of. For example, available choices include Menominee (Michigan? Wisconsin?), or Crotone, Italy – small towns for sure. Why? What is their significance? Are these the hometowns of certain Apple employees? Maybe the answer is staring in my face. If anyone knows, please leave a comment!


    The Edit pane lets you rearrange and delete the clocks. You can also set your preferred temperature scale



    If you want to change the order of the city clocks, or to delete them, tap the Edit button at the top-left. A standard picker is shown. To change the order of the city clocks, tap-and-drag vertically the "grab" handle at the right of the city name. Tap the red minus-sign button to delete a city. This will open up a spot for you to configure back on the main World Clock panel as described previously. At the bottom of the Edit panel, you can select your preferred temperature scale (°F or °C).

    The Alarm Module

    The Alarm module is visually rich ("eye candy" in the tech lingo), giving you an overall view of your alarm clock landscape. Setting your alarms is pretty much like what we've seen on the smaller iOS devices.

    You create a new alarm by tapping on the + button at the top-right. You are then presented with a panel for choosing time, repeat options, sound options, snooze on/off, and for assigning a label to your alarm. Notice that you can also choose a music title from your iTunes library for your wake-up call.

    Finally, you are given the option to flip over to the iTunes Music Store to purchase and download additional tones and have them automatically installed as choices for the alarm clock.


    The Alarms module



    Your various alarms are represented as buttons on the timeline. The ones in blue are set to ring, whereas the ones in gray are turned off. This is controlled via the on/off switch at the top, to the right of the digital clock display. It would be great if we could tap-and-drag these alarms around to make changes. Perhaps in a future revision. For now, all you can do is to tap on an alarm to select it so that you can delete it or make changes. These actions are accomplished by tapping on the Edit button at the top-left.

    By the way, when one or more alarms are armed, you will see a small analog clock icon on your iPad's status bar at the top-right side of the screen. Oh, and the Clock app does not need to be running in order for any module alarms to go off.

    The Stopwatch Module

    Not much to talk about here. The standard stopwatch controls are provided: Start/Lap and Stop/Reset. All the lap split times are listed, and you can easily scroll through them by swiping up and down.


    The Stopwatch and Timer modules


    The Timer Module

    The Timer is also simple to use. You can set it at one-minute increments for up to 24 hours. There are controls for Start/Done and Pause/Resume. You can also set the sound used to announce when the timer reaches zero. The countdown timer is shown on a pleasant animated gradient circle that depicts the passing of time.

    In conclusion, you might be wondering what time it is. Well, if your iPad time-keeping requirements are not too complex, it's time for you to check out the new Clock app in iOS 6. And, take some *time* to admire its elegant look.

    1-5-13

    www.macobserver.com

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    Find Archived eMails & Move Them Back to the Inbox in iOS



    Moving email around between inboxes in the iOS Mail app is easy, and perhaps sometimes it’s too easy, because accidentally moving or archiving mail messages seems to be an ongoing issue for many. In fact, one of the most frequently asked questions I get from newcomers to the iPhone or iPad is “where did my email go? It disappeared from my inbox, I think I pressed something accidentally and deleted it!” I’ve even accidentally done this myself in a half-daze of sleep at the wee hours of the night, only to return to my Mail inbox in the morning to not be able to find the email message I was looking for. Not to worry, your emails aren’t missing – well, unless you deleted them, but even in that case if you move fast enough you can usually recover them from the “Trash” folder using the same method we’ll discuss below.

    Locating and Moving Archived Emails Back to the Inbox

    Here’s how you can find your archived emails and return messages from the “Archive” list back to your primary inbox. Whether that move was accidental or not doesn’t really matter because the process will be the same to get your mailbox in order again.

    Tap on “Mailboxes” and then tap on “All Mail”
    Wait for all the messages to load, then locate and tap on the email you want to put back into the inbox
    With the email onscreen, tap the folder icon with an arrow pointing down
    At the next “Move this message to a new mailbox” screen, tap on “Inbox” to relocate the email back to your regular mail inbox window
    Tap back to Mailboxes, then choose Inbox as usual, and you’ll find your email in place again




    In the example screen shot, the ‘REI Gearmail’ message was inadvertently moved to the archives, and then relocated again to the primary Inbox using the aforementioned steps.

    How this probably happened, and how to avoid it again

    Now that your inbox is back to normal and your emails are no longer archived, you’ll probably want to pay attention to how this likely happened in the first place so you can prevent it from happening again. Typically emails are accidentally moved by either using a swipe gesture and accidental tap on the red “Archive” button, accidentally tapping the archive button when trying to flag something as unread, or when marking emails as read it’s very easy to accidentally tap the red “Archive” button rather than “Mark” as intended since the eye naturally goes to the big red button. All of this makes sense from a touch UI standpoint, but it can be a bit unintuitive to newcomers to iOS, and with the smaller sized iPod touch and iPhone screens it seems particularly easy to touch the wrong thing and seemingly send an email into oblivion.

    What about old emails that were accidentally moved months ago?

    For emails that have long been relocated or moved, follow the same instructions above but once within the “All Mail” inbox, use a swipe gesture down to reveal the search box within Mail app. Use this to locate the email(s) in question, then move them using the same method as described above.

    What about accidentally deleted emails?

    As mentioned at the start of this article, if you think you accidentally deleted a bunch of emails rather than archived them, tap from the Mailboxes window to the “Trash” box, and you can typically find messages here unless they have been emptied.

    1-8-13

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    Get a New IP Address on iPhone or iPad by Renewing DHCP Lease



    If you need to get a new IP address from a router that any iPhone, iPad, or other iOS device is connected to, you can either set a manual IP address or, what’s likely more relevant to most people, you’ll want to renew the DHCP lease directly from the wi-fi router itself. Renewing the lease this way should alleviate any potential conflicts with other devices on the network, and it also fills in everything from subnet mask, router, DNS settings, in addition to the new IP. Here’s how to do this in iOS:

    Open Settings and choose “Wi-Fi”

    Find the wireless network the device is connected to and tap on the (>) blue arrow – not the name of the router

    Under the DHCP tab (the default), scroll down to reveal “Renew Lease” and tap on it, confirm to renew the lease when asked

    All network fields will clear out and go blank for a moment, then refill with a new IP address and the other standard DHCP networking info

    Close out of Settings



    Typically people need new IP addresses to get around network conflicts with other devices on the same network, though most modern wi-fi routers are much better at handing out IP’s and theoretically should never assign the same address to multiple devices. Nevertheless, it does happen from time to time even with the newest hardware and newest routers, especially if there is a lot of activity on a network. For those who repeatedly encounter the conflicts, assigning a manual address higher in the IP range than what is typically assigned can resolve that problem completely as well, you’ll probably want to check the current IP before taking a wild guess though.

    Renewing a DHCP lease is also standard protocol for troubleshooting a lot of network connection issues with routers and even broadband service providers, but don’t be surprised if you’re on the tech support line with a big cable or DSL provider and the only thing they know how to troubleshoot is a Windows device. Fortunately, DHCP is extremely easy to manage in iOS and after you do this once it should be easy to memorize.

    As usual, this same process applies to all iOS devices, including the iPad and iPod touch as well, even though the screenshots are from an iPhone.

    (Note: this is not the same as getting a new WAN IP address for a cellular device)

    1-11-13

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    How to Set Manual DHCP and a Static IP Address on an iPad or iPhone



    Certain Wi-Fi networks require clients to use static IP addresses or manual DHCP information in order for a device to connect properly, setting either of these is easy within iOS.

    Tap on “Settings” and then tap on “General”

    Tap “Wi-Fi” and look for the network name you are connected to, tap the blue (>) arrow next to it

    Tap the “Static” tab and enter network appropriate DHCP/static IP information

    Close out of Settings and launch Safari or another network app to confirm connectivity

    Settings are applied automatically after all the information is typed in, if you need an easy to remember DNS try using Google’s 8.8.8.8 server.

    I’ve had to set manual DHCP information in order to connect iPads to certain older Wi-Fi networks on more than one occasion, something I’ve encountered in Mac OS X Lion before as well.

    1-11-13

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    Find Out How Much Storage Space Photos Take Up on iPhone



    Opening the Photos app in iOS will tell you how many total photos are within albums and Camera Roll, but how much space do they take up? If you want to know the actual storage size of all those pictures are consuming on an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch you’ll need to dig a bit deeper:

    Launch Settings and tap on “General”, then choose “Usage” to find general storage information broken down into categories, wait for the loading indicator to finish gathering storage and usage info
    At the top of the list, next to “Photos & Camera” will be the GB of storage taken up by the photos and camera roll




    If interested, go a step further and actually tap on the “Photos & Camera” list item to see a more precise drill-down screen about where the space is actually used up and by what photo services.

    The screenshot below shows us that the generic “Camera Roll” – that is, photos taken directly with the iPhone camera and photos saved from the web and emails, are consuming 4.5GB of space. Photo Library are photos synced with iPhoto on the desktop, in the screenshot example there is nothing there. Finally, there’s Photo Stream, the iCloud-based photo sharing service that will easily sync pictures between iOS devices and a Mac, but again in the example screenshot this is taking up practically nothing, only 3.2kb, because it has been disabled for this particular iPhone.




    Knowing how much total space photos are taking up on a device can be really useful information, since photos in particular can often be the culprit when running out of device storage. Each picture taken with an iPhone’s multi-megapixel camera can weigh in at a couple megabytes each, and if you’re running low on storage, oftentimes photos are one of the easiest things to transfer to a computer, then free up space on an iOS device by deleting them all so you can make room for new stuff, whether it’s more pictures, new apps, videos, or whatever else.

    This walkthrough is aimed at iPhone users primarily because the iPhone is becoming an increasingly prevalent camera, but the instructions would be the same on an iPad or iPod touch too. If you’re running low on space check this first, almost anytime I hear that someone ran out of storage in iOS it’s because they haven’t taken the time to regularly copy their photos to a computer so that they can make room for new ones.

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    Get New Email Faster on the iPhone by Changing Fetch Settings



    Have you noticed that it can sometimes take a while to get an email notification on to the iPhone? The time it takes to check for new emails from mail servers is actually a simple settings option for some email providers, and this means it’s easy to speed up if you want to get alerts sooner and closer to the time the message was actually received.

    To clarify, this tip is for mail providers that use “Fetch” to get new data, meaning they manually check the mail server for new messages. This isn’t going to be necessary for email providers that utilize “Push”, which as it sounds, actively pushes new mail to iOS as it is received. Before beginning, determine which type your service uses:

    Check If Your Email Provider Uses Push or Fetch

    Open Settings and tap “Mail, Contacts, Calendars”, then tap “Fetch New Data”
    Choose the “Advanced” option to see a list of mail accounts configured with Mail app in iOS and to see if they are using Push, Fetch, or Manual
    In this screenshot, Gmail is using “Fetch” and therefore will be able to get email faster by altering the fetch settings:




    Change Fetch Mail Settings to Get New eMail Faster

    Again, this tip will only speed up accounts configured to Fetch, or for email accounts configured to check mail manually it will help a lot there too, unless you’re constantly refreshing the Mail app.

    Open Settings and choose “Mail, Contacts, Calendars”
    Choose “Fetch New Data” and set Fetch to “Every 15 Minutes”




    The default setting in iOS is to fetch emails hourly, but that’s really not fast enough for some users, particularly if you’re expecting something important, you’re on call for work, or if you’d just prefer to get new data as fast as possible.

    There is a catch with having aggressive fetch settings however, and that is the potential to reduce battery life of the iPhone. This is made worse when the iPhone is in the wild on cellular networks, because the time it takes to open a connecting to a remote server through LTE, 3G/4G, or Edge 2G is going to vary widely depending on cell coverage, and each task runs in the background until completed. In fact, one of the common tips to improve battery life for an iPhone is the complete opposite of this, and to reduce the fetch setting to a higher interval. If battery life concerns you, be cautious of this setting, because it definitely does have an impact on how long a device will last, and you may want to change the setting according to your situation. That said, most of us keep our iPhones with us all the time and most of us aren’t too far from a charger either at work or home, so the faster mail deliveries are worth the trade off.

    By the way, this isn’t going to apply quite the same to those using different mail apps for different addresses, since individual iOS apps get pushes separately that are in turn handled through Settings > Notifications, but that’s really another topic.

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    How to Choose Capture Direction in iOS 6 Panorama Mode



    By default, and as advertised by Apple, a user makes a panoramic image by moving the phone from left to right. Apple denotes this movement with an arrow that directs the user to move the camera to the right.

    For reasons of both comfort and practicality, however, it may sometimes be better to move the camera from right to left instead. While this can be crudely done by holding the phone upside-down, Apple built in a better way.

    Once you’ve launched the Panorama capture mode (Camera App > Options > Panorama), simply tap once on the right side of the screen to switch the panorama capture direction. You’ll see the arrow flip to the other side of the screen to indicate the new direction of motion. Tap it again on the left side to switch back.

    Note, however, that Apple will reset the motion from left to right once the Panorama capture mode is closed, so users will have to reset the motion each time if they prefer right to left.

    1-17-13

    www.macobserver.com

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