640,000 LA School Kids To Receive Free iPads By The End Of 2014

This is a discussion on 640,000 LA School Kids To Receive Free iPads By The End Of 2014 within the iPad News forums, part of the Apple News category; The Los Angeles School Board of Education has announced a new program that will see 640,000 school kids given free iPads. 31,000 of those will ...

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    317 times

    640,000 LA School Kids To Receive Free iPads By The End Of 2014



    The Los Angeles School Board of Education has announced a new program that will see 640,000 school kids given free iPads. 31,000 of those will be given out this year, while the other 609,000 will be issued by the end of 2014. The program comes after a $31 million deal with Apple.

    However, that $31 million only covers the first 31,000 devices; the board will then need to secure more funding to purchase the rest, CiteWorld reports. The program’s goal is to improve education, and provide children with new technology skills that they wouldn’t typically get at home.

    “The most important thing is to try to prepare the kids for the technology they are going to face when they are going to graduate,” said Mark Hovatter, the chief facilities executive for the LAUSD.

    “This is phase one, a mix of high school, middle school, and elementary students. We’re targeting kids who most likely don’t have their own computers or laptops or iPads. Their only exposure to computers now is going to be in their schools.”

    Each iPad will be loaded with digital textbooks and educational apps that will help students plan and synchronize their schedules, share reference videos and news, use interactive lessons, and conduct reading tests. In turn, the LAUSD will save money on traditional paper textbooks.

    Apple first announced the deal last month, then mentioned it again during its recent quarterly earnings call. The Cupertino company revealed that the program would cover 47 campuses across LA.


    7-26-13

    Source

  2. Ads

    Posts
    Many

  3. #2
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    317 times

    LA Board of Education approves $115-million deal to bring iPads to classrooms



    In an ongoing effort to equip more classrooms with tablets and computers, the Los Angeles Board of Education has green lighted a plan to distribute and integrate iPads in nearly 40 campuses throughout the school district, the Los Angeles Times reports. The deal which was approved allots $115 million for deploying between 40,000 and 70,000 tablets to classrooms for use by students and teachers used especially for spring-scheduled standardized testing.

    While the final count has yet to be determined, the agreement approved by the education board omits a specific limit on number of iPads deployed. The board and district superintendent have both expressed plans to expedite the deployment, though that effort has not been without critics looking to spend more time on the plan specifics.

    Board member Monica Garcia said moving quickly was an educational imperative.

    “The whole point of this program is to revolutionize instruction,” Garcia said. Low-income students don’t get access “to what is a part of all our worlds today…. I don’t understand how cutting back what’s good is good for kids.”

    LA Times also reports the district will pay $768 per device which is relatively higher than what other districts spend, but includes network upgrades to the schools as well as iPad-specific curriculum for the classrooms.

    Officials representing the school district appear to be in talks with Apple on discounted tablet pricing for devices used solely for student testing where a curriculum may not be necessary.





    1-15-14

    9to5mac.com

  4. #3
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    317 times

    Los Angeles school district to shift away from Apple's iPad to Windows, Chromebook



    A report over the weekend confirmed the Los Angeles Unified School District is planning to switch up a $1 billion technology in education project, allowing certain high schools in its jurisdiction to choose from six different Windows and Chromebook laptops instead of Apple's iPad.

    According to the Los Angeles Times, LAUSD officials recently signed off on a plan that will let 27 high schools in the district choose from one of six laptop and hybrid computer designs, none of which are Apple products.

    The new direction is a drastic shift from L.A. Unified's previous path to equip every student in the district with Apple's tablet.

    "The benefit of the new approach is clear," said L.A. Unified school board member and chair of the panel that reviewed the educational technology initiative Monica Ratliff. "Why would we treat all our students — whether they are a first-grader or a high school freshman — as if they all had the same technology needs? They don't...To have a one-device-fits-all approach does not make sense."

    School administrators will be able to select from the Lenovo Yoga Touch, Microsoft's Surface Pro 2, the Dell Latitude E7240 and two Chromebook models. Total cost for the Windows machines are thought to run higher than Apple's iPad, while the Chromebooks will most likely cost less.

    In addition to diversifying the platform base, some teachers said the iPad does not fit the needs of students taking standardized tests, citing insufficient screen size and the lack of a built-in keyboard as major deficiencies.

    The board failed to address the additional costs likely associated with making a major platform switch halfway through the tech rollout, nor did it offer details on how schools plan to merge three distinct operating systems into a cohesive learning experience. Curriculum from Pearson, McGraw-Hill/StudySync and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt are currently under review for deployment on the Windows and Chromebook machines.

    Apple successfully brokered a deal in June 2013 to supply iPads preloaded with specialized educational software to LAUSD schools. The original contract was expected to grow to at least $500 million.

    In January, the district earmarked another $115 million for additional iPads, though problems with the rollout put a hold on the program earlier this year. For example, the district halted distribution after students found a way to circumvent built-in security features denying them access to certain websites like Facebook and YouTube.

    Critics also noted the project is running woefully over budget due to confusion regarding the bulk purchase discount Apple agreed to supply with the iPad buy. Ironically, L.A. Unified will only be eligible for special pricing after $400 million worth of iPads — about 520,000 units — are purchased.

    LAUSD is injecting more than $1 billion into the technology initiative, with the first round of funding coming from voter-approved bonds. Sources of future funding are unknown and officials did not make clear whether any of that money will be put toward additional Apple products. For now, Apple is still scheduled to deliver what could be its last batch of iPads to select LAUSD schools this fall.





    7-1-14

    Source

  5. #4
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    317 times

    LA Unified School District suspends iPad deal, faces accusations that officials had c



    Though it was much-touted when Apple signed the contract last year, the company's massive deal to sell iPads to the Los Angeles Unified School District has now officially been suspended, amid accusations that top employees at the district had improperly close ties with the Cupertino, Calif., company.

    With a report accusing the bidding process for the project of being tailor made to benefit the eventual winners, Apple and Pearson, the district has chosen to halt its deal with Apple, the Los Angeles Times reported this week. Superintendent John Deasy and Deputy Superintendent Jaime Aquino were found to have had regular contact with executives at both Apple and Pearson, giving the appearance of a potential conflict of interest.

    Deasy issued a memo to the L.A. Board of Education on Monday stating that the district will "no longer utilize" its contract with Apple moving forward. The superintendent said the move will allow the district to "take advantage of an ever-changing marketplace and technology advances," but also give it "time to take into account concerns raised" about the project.

    It was just over a year ago that the Los Angeles public schools revealed they planned to exclusively use Apple's iPad for a new digital textbook program. Apple touted the $30 million deal, saying it was "thrilled" to have been selected and to work with L.A. Unified.

    At the time, Aquino said Apple was selected because the iPad "rated the best in quality, was the least expensive option and received the highest scoring by the review panel that included students and teachers."

    And earlier this year, the board earmarked another $115 million for additional iPads, but that move followed accusations that the project was running grossly over budget. After that, the project began to fall apart, and by June the district revealed it would instead allow certain high schools to choose from six different Windows and Chromebook laptops instead of Apple's iPad.

    In addition to diversifying the platform base, some teachers said the iPad does not fit the needs of students taking standardized tests, citing insufficient screen size and the lack of a built-in keyboard as major deficiencies.

    The board failed to address the additional costs likely associated with making a major platform switch halfway through the tech rollout, nor did it offer details on how schools plan to merge three distinct operating systems into a cohesive learning experience. Curriculum from Pearson, McGraw-Hill/StudySync and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt are currently under review for deployment on the Windows and Chromebook machines.





    8-26-14

    Source

  6. #5
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    317 times

    Apple will re-bid on nixed $1 billion LA Unified School District iPad contract



    Though Apple's contract with the Los Angeles Unified School District to put iPads in the hands of every student was canceled this week, the company still has a shot to win out in the end, bidding once again on the troubled $1 billion project.

    Both Apple and Pearson had their contracts severed by Los Angeles officials this week, but they will be supplying new bids as the nation's second-largest district looks to regroup, according to The Wall Street Journal. Still, the canceled contract essentially sets Apple back at square one, more than a year after the company had publicly touted the deal as a coup for the iPad in education.

    The original plan called for a $1 billion rollout of iPads sporting digital textbooks from Pearson to all public school students in the Los Angeles area. But the project quickly ran grossly over budget, and more recently the deal was scrutinized as accusations arose that top employees at the district had improperly close ties with Apple.

    Specifically, Superintendent John Deasy and Deputy Superintendent Jaime Aquino were found to have had regular contact with executives at both Apple and Pearson well before they won the contract, which gave some the appearance of a potential conflict of interest. Deasy insists that the bidding process was conducted properly, but agreed to cancel the contract to "take advantage of an ever-changing marketplace" and also give "time to take into account concerns raised" about the project.

    As of now, there's no timeframe as to how the future re-bidding process will work. So far, Los Angeles had spent about $61 million on tablets and laptops for about 40 schools, or 4 percent of the district.

    Though Apple will apparently remain a part of the bidding process, the company has remained silent on the nixing of the contract, and has not responded to accusations that it worked improperly close with the district superintendent in order to secure the deal.

    While Los Angeles got cold feet, other schools around the country have been embracing Apple's iPad, including an announcement this week from Minnesota's St. Paul School District, which plans to roll out 40,000 iPads to students in 37 schools around the city. Rather than purchasing the tablets, the school district plans to lease them from Apple.

    Apple revealed in its last quarterly earnings call that more than 13 million iPads have been sold for education globally. The company also said it currently sells 2 and a half iPads for every Mac sold to kindergarten through 12th grade institutions.





    8-27-14

    Source

  7. #6
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    317 times

    LA Unified School District's defunct 'iPad-for-all' plan botched from start



    According to a federal study, the Los Angeles Unified School District's $1.3 billion push to bring tech into the classroom was crippled early on by inadequate planning and over-reliance on Apple's iPad.

    A U.S. Education Department review found the LAUSD iPad in education initiative, first announced last June, to be fraught with financial and administrative problems from its inception, reports the Los Angeles Times.

    Headed by Richard Culatta, director of the Office of Educational Technology, the review found "iPad-for-all" put too strong an emphasis on Apple's hardware and software ecosystem, distracting from less-expensive options that could have saved money. In July, it was reported the L.A. Unified would move away from an iPad-only rollout to include Google's Chromebook and Windows devices, including Microsoft's Surface 2.

    LAUSD officials formally axed the iPad program in December, with blowback from the decision playing a part in the resignation of former Superintendent John Deasy and former head of technology Ronald Chandler.

    Aside from an overwhelming financial burden, the erstwhile project also failed to properly educate teachers on how to best implement Apple's tablets into classroom curricula, the report said. Senior management involved in the program also failed to pass along concerns and issues in a timely manner, allowing them to grow into larger problems, according to the publication.

    "Among the most significant gaps we identified was the absence of district-wide instructional technology leadership," the report said. On the point of relying on Apple's iPad, the review said LAUSD was too "heavily dependent on a single commercial product for providing digital learning resources, which has plagued the project since the initial rollout."

    Another sticking point is the apparent lack of an evaluation framework. The federal report notes the problem is ongoing, saying some schools "have not developed plans for how the devices will be used to support learning [...] As a result, there is no common vision for how devices should be shifting learning and teaching within schools, making measuring impact difficult, if even possible."

    The district used voter-approved bonds to fund "iPad-for-all," initially seeding 47 schools with $30 million worth of Apple hardware. An aggressive rollout timeline saw an additional $115 million spent on expansions to other campuses, but questions soon arose as the district fought to manage a critical budget crunch over the program. It was later discovered that LAUSD misunderstood Apple's bulk purchase discount terms, which held that the district would become eligible for special pricing only after $400 million worth of iPads were purchased.





    1-13-15

    Source

  8. #7
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    317 times

    LAUSD seeks multimillion-dollar refund from Apple for scrapped iPad in education prog



    After officially scrapping a $1.3 billion educational technology initiative based on Apple's iPad, the Los Angeles Unified School District is reportedly demanding the company either return millions of dollars or face a lawsuit.

    According to local radio station KPCC, LAUSD informed Apple that it will no longer put money toward course material provided by content partner Pearson, saying the district was "extremely dissatisfied" with the software implementation. Educators complained that Pearson's software was half-baked, contained errors and lacked lessons and promised interactive material.

    "While Apple and Pearson promised a state-of-the-art technological solution for ITI implementation, they have yet to deliver it," LAUSD attorney David Holmquist wrote in a letter to Apple's general counsel. "As we approach the end of the school year, the vast majority of students are still unable to access the Pearson curriculum on iPads."

    LAUSD rolled out the first phase of its now defunct Instructional Technology Initiative, also known as "iPad-for-all," in 2013 with a $30 million agreement to supply iPads to 47 seed campuses. ITI would become an ambitious $1.3 billion project hoping to provide similar technology to more than 640,000 students.

    The district officially killed the initiative in December after a tumultuous start involving mismanagement and shady funding plans by former schools Superintendent John Deasy. Critics took issue with the bidding process, saying Apple and Pearson had an unfair advantage in winning the lucrative contract, claims currently at the center of an ongoing FBI investigation. Deasy ultimately resigned in October of 2014.

    Teachers also faced problems implementing iPads into their curriculum, including a security breach in which students discovered they could bypass school-imposed content filters. Administrators last year opened the program up to other platforms, including Google's Chromebook and Microsoft's Surface.





    4-16-15

    Source

  9. #8
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    317 times

    L.A. schools to receive $6.4 million from botched iPad deal




    The long-running disaster that was the Los Angeles Unified School District scheme to provide iPads to every student, teacher and campus administrator is apparently over – with Apple among the companies agreeing to pay out a $6.4 million settlement.

    The tentative payout is hopefully the last phase in an aborted $1.3-billion plan for the second-largest district in the U.S. to get its hands on new iPads and Pearson educational software.

    Under the agreement, Apple will pay out $4.2 million, while the school district will not have to pay the $2.2 million bill it owes Lenovo for laptops featuring the Pearson curriculum.

    “That amount of money doesn’t make up for the damage to the district’s reputation or compensate for the amount of time lost by students and educators in this misbegotten project,” said Scott Folsom, a member of the independent committee which oversees school modernization and construction bonds.

    By paying out $6.4 million, Apple and Pearson won’t have to undergo costly ongoing legal discussions.

    This case has been a messy one for all involved – with delays, FBI investigations, missing devices, and students who did receive their devices quickly learning how to hack them in order to access whatever they wanted online. As the LA Times explains of the problems:


    “At the time of the [2013] pact with Apple, Pearson was supposed to provide all the math and English curriculum for the school system. The contract with Apple included a three-year license for the Pearson curriculum that added about $200 to the cost of each computer.

    During the first year of the license, Pearson provided only sample units of curriculum, rather than a finished product. The contract allowed for the partial curriculum.

    Teachers received limited training on the devices. The district later accused Pearson of providing an underwhelming product beset by technical glitches. Consultants concluded that few teachers even used the Pearson software.”


    Hopefully all involved can now put this behind them, and figure out a way to move forward.

    Provided that the “tentative agreement” does, in fact, turn out to be the end of the line, that is!





    9-29-15

    Source

Remove Ads

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Apple’s iOS Devices Receive Pentagon Approval
    By sparkyscott21 in forum Apple News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-17-2013, 12:40 PM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-31-2012, 06:02 AM
  3. Apple Stores Replace Kids' Table iMacs With iPads
    By sparkyscott21 in forum Apple News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-28-2012, 02:20 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-07-2011, 12:20 PM

Contact Us
Back to top