Hands-On Impressions of the iPhone 5s, iPhone 5c, and Touch ID

This is a discussion on Hands-On Impressions of the iPhone 5s, iPhone 5c, and Touch ID within the iPhone News forums, part of the Apple News category; A number of news sites have been able to go hands-on with Apple's newly announced iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c, both of which introduce a ...

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    Hands-On Impressions of the iPhone 5s, iPhone 5c, and Touch ID

    A number of news sites have been able to go hands-on with Apple's newly announced iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c, both of which introduce a number of new features. While the iPhone 5c’s major selling point is its bright and colorful polycarbonate shell, the iPhone 5s boasts processor improvements and a new Touch ID fingerprint sensor.


    iPhone 5s

    In a hands-on post of the iPhone 5s, The Verge notes that the gold color “looks better in person” compared to leaked images, and notes that the "Space Gray" and white colors are very similar to the iPhone 5. The major difference between the iPhone 5s and the iPhone 5 is the ring around the home button and the slightly larger flash.

    Starting with that home button, it's now made of sapphire so that it can act as a reliable fingerprint reader. It's not nearly as concave as previous models — in fact, it's almost flat. Luckily, it still maintains a nice, tactile feel when you click on it and we don't foresee anybody running into any issues. We watched the fingerprint sensor unlock the phone quickly and easily (though we didn't get to try it ourselves).

    Everything felt fast and fluid — although the animations in iOS 7 are still a little slow to our tastes — but scrolling in the new Safari was better than before, if only by a tiny amount.





    TechCrunch also went hands-on with the iPhone 5s, and was able to experiment with the Touch ID fingerprint sensor, which supports up to five different fingerprints.

    Essentially you spend some time letting the sensors in the Home button get used to your fingerprint, moving your finger around slightly, lifting it up just above the surface and putting it back down, with a graphic filling out how near the software is to being able to recognize your fingerprint (you can use thumb or index finger, depending on your preference).

    The process took about 30 seconds to a minute overall, and then once it had successfully identified by fingerprint, it worked flawlessly to unlock the device for every subsequent trial. It also readily rejected Greg Kumparak’s attempts, proving that it isn’t just accepting all comers.



    iPhone 5c

    According to TechCrunch, the iPhone 5c has a “lightness” in the hand thanks to the single-piece case design and “looks fantastic” in its array of bright colors.

    All of that is made more impressive by the fact that the iPhone performs terrifically, and looks fantastic. The colors really pop, and the case fits solidly in the hand and thanks to a slightly rubberized feel it should be easier to hold onto than any previous iPhone as well. The color-match wallpapers add to the charm of the overall package, and that’s likely to appeal to customers who just want a device that looks great out of the box and doesn’t require any laborious customization.




    Engadget thought that the iPhone 5c had a very "solid" polycarbonate build that will hold up to scuffs and drops.

    There is absolutely nothing about this setup that makes us believe it's not capable of handling a full share of wear and tear, and the reinforced steel frame convinces us that it's even going to survive falls without a problem.

    Speaking of which, the 5c has a glossy finish, but we were quite happy to find that it's not the fingerprint magnet that we've come to expect on other devices. It sufficiently handled the greasy fingerprints of a couple hundred journalists, so we doubt there will be any reason to be concerned about this phone looking dirty. In fact, it has a subtle shine to it that serves to complement the color selection.

    The Verge was also impressed with the feel of the plastic iPhone 5c, though noted that it did not compare to the high-end feel of the iPhone 5s.

    The 5c is almost like a toy, a rugged, comfortable device that doesn’t feel much heavier than the iPhone 5 despite being noticeably larger. According to Apple, the device has a larger battery than the iPhone 5, which along with its plastic shell goes a way to explaining its bulk.

    This is how you make a plastic phone, though: from the cohesive shell to the smooth and glossy back (which did pick up a fair number of fingerprints) the device feels far better than Samsung’s or LG’s plastic options. Even the rubbery cases look nice, their open-circle backs fitting in nicely with the color palette.

    Both the iPhone 5c and the iPhone 5s will be available for customers on September 20. Apple will begin accepting pre-orders for the iPhone 5c on September 13, but does not plan to take pre-orders for the iPhone 5s. The 16GB iPhone 5c will be priced at $99 while the 16GB iPhone 5s will be priced at $199, both with a 2-year contract.





    9-10-13

    www.macrumors.com

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    Hands-on with the new 64-bit A7-powered iPhone 5s with new M7,camera features & Touch



    Without any of Samsung's embarrassing show stereotypes and circus theatrics, Apple unveiled its "forward thinking" new iPhone 5s as not just "what's next," but "what should be next," advancing mobile devices into the 64-bit computing world for the first time.

    The new iPhone 5s joins the previously considered iPhone 5c as a pair of new options that take the company's existing flagship iPhone 5 in new directions. While the 5c takes the 5 into the mainstream with iPod-inspired colors, the 5s raises the bar to create a new luxury tier (although not without color options of its own).

    Like the iPhone 5c, the new 5s offers expanded support for new LTE bands, enabling support on additional carriers worldwide.

    While there were three model variants of iPhone 5 (A1428 North American GSM; A1429 CDMA & Global GSM; and A1442 for China Telecom CDMA with UIM/WAPI but no LTE support) there are four versions of iPhone 5s (A1533 North American GSM/CDMA for both ATT & Verizon; A1453 Sprint/Japan CDMA with additional support for LTE bands 18&26; A1457 for Europe lacking LTE bands 4/AWS, 13, 17, 18, 19, 26 but adding 7; A1530 for Asia/Pacific, identical to Europe but adding support for China Mobile's TD-LTE bands 38, 39 and 40, which is also used in Australia).

    Both models also now include $40 worth of first party, chart topping apps exclusive to iOS: Pages, Keynote, Numbers, iPhoto and iMovie.


    iPhone 5s Camera, True Tone Flash



    One readily apparent external difference on the iPhone 5s is its dual element flash (below), which Apple refers to as "True Tone." It incorporates both a cool white and warm amber flash that are used together in independently variable degrees to match the needed flash intensity and color temperature with the ambient lighting conditions when taking low light photos.




    Apple notes the result is more accurate colors and more natural, flattering skin tones, illustrated in the example presented during the keynote (below).














    9-12-13

    appleinsider.com

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    The iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c: what you need to know



    We’re now in that funny in-between time: on Tuesday, Apple announced the new iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c, providing some information about both. We had a brief hands-on session with both of them. But now we have to wait a week and a half before we can actually get our own new phones and find out everything we want to know. In the meantime, here are our answers to some of the most pressing questions about the new smartphones, based on what Apple has told us and our own investigations.


    The basics

    When can I get the new iPhone models?

    You can pre-order an iPhone 5c starting on Friday 13 September; the 5c will actually be available on 20 September. The iPhone 5s will also be available on 20 September, but Apple isn’t taking pre-orders for that model. These dates apply to the US, Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Japan, Puerto Rico, Singapore and the UK.

    How much do the phones cost?

    In Australia, unlocked (without a contract), the iPhone 5c will cost $739 for the 16GB version and $869 for the 32GB version.

    Also without a contract, the iPhone 5s will cost $869 (16GB), $999 (32GB) and $1129 (64GB). As with the 5c, you can get the unlocked model for use with T-Mobile. (Apple’s site doesn’t currently list a no-SIM option for the 5s.)




    Which carriers are offering the iPhone 5c and 5s?

    In Australia, your contract-carrier choices are Optus, Telstra and Vodafone. They will also be available through the usual resellers and online retailers.

    How much will it cost me to upgrade from my existing iPhone?

    That depends on the carrier and type of contract you have. You can check your upgrade eligibility via Apple’s website.


    How they compare

    How does the 5c compare to the iPhone 5?

    From a hardware perspective, the 5c is very similar to the iPhone 5. It uses the same processor (Apple’s A6), the same graphics circuitry and the same screen. The main differences are that the 5c includes a slightly more capacious battery, compatibility with more bands of LTE, an updated FaceTime HD camera that features larger pixels and a better backside-illumination sensor.













    9-12-13

    www.macworld.com

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    Why Touch ID is bigger news than any of us appreciated




    Touch ID is far, far more important than most people have realised – the core message behind a Quora post by the CEO of a card payment service. We can expect to learn far more “in the next few months, and that’s likely to eventually include both Touch ID Macs and use of the fingerprint system for mobile payments.

    In the torrent of the billions of words already written about Touch ID very, very few people have really understood just how revolutionary this really is. Apple not only has developed one of the most accurate mass produced biometric security devices, they have also solved critical problems with how the data from this device will be encrypted, stored and secured.

    Brian Roemmele, CEO of 1st American Card Service, said that Apple’s attempt to solve the problem of how to develop a truly secure access system goes all the way back to a patent application in 2008, but it was only through the A7 chip – specifically created by ARM with mobile payment security in mind – that the company finally had a gold-standard solution. And its applications will go far beyond iPhone unlock and iTunes purchases …

    Let’s start with understanding just how secure the Touch ID system really is. The video Apple released explaining how Touch ID works referred to a ‘Secure Enclave’ within a A7 chip. Such terms are sometimes used metaphorically, but Roemmele says there is no exaggeration going on here.

    There are numerous reasons Apple moved to the A7 processor. One reason is the hardware requirements of Touch ID. To economically create the Secure Enclave, Apple needed a processor that is already aware of the concept of encryption and security at a native level and has the dedicated hardware to make a segregated and secure area with in the processor architecture.

    The chip effectively creates two distinct environments – normal and secure:





    The key to the security is that this is not just conceptual, handled at a software level, but is a fundamental part of the design of the hardware: embedded right into the A7 chip. What is shown here is ARM’s own approach, known as TrustZone. Apple’s Secure Enclave will use the same approach, but may well be an Apple-specific implementation: understandably, neither Apple nor ARM is going to comment on this. But here’s what TrustZone looks like at a hardware level:





    The chip is running two completely separate systems, with the biometric data handled only within the secure world, and a simple yes/no response handed to anything running in the normal world. So when you authenticate an iTunes purchase with your fingerprint, neither iTunes nor the app has any access to the fingerprint data: all it knows is whether the secure world passed back a yes or a no. That’s standard for any secure system, but it’s the first time that such an approach has been built in at the hardware level.

    Thus we can really see just how deep the security runs in DNA of the A7 processor. The deep level hardware based secure architecture is rather rock solid. It would require a rather large magnitude of hardware hacking to even attempt access to the data stored in the Secure Enclave.

    And mobile payment? That was the key driver behind this, and iTunes is – as we’d hoped – merely the first stage.

    There are dozens of applications and use cases on the roadmap and I am certain a developer economy will build around this amazing technology. One that is very clear is retail payments and Apple will have quite a number of unique ways they will solve real problems for merchants and iPhone users. I can say this aspect of Touch ID will be more magical then what we have seen thus far. There will be connections to iBeacons and the amazing technology Apple just acquired through Passif.

    One can argue that some of this is just one man’s view – albeit someone who ought to know a thing or two about the topic – but it’s clear that mobile payment was the core application behind ARM’s work. It would be more surprising if Apple didn’t plan to use it in this way than if it did.

    The piece also hints at use of Touch ID for iCloud – and that means Macs getting Touch ID too. It was always likely, of course, even just for the unlock, but this makes it pretty much a given.

    Apple’s soft-launch of the technology with very limited applications at first also makes perfect sense if Apple plans to get into the mobile payment game itself. With a massive user-base, the iBeacon & Bluetooth LE combo that goes way beyond NFC and this level of security, it’s not hard to imagine that Apple’s next move could be to effectively become … a bank.






    9-17-13

    9to5mac.com

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    Watch A Kitten’s Paw Unlock The iPhone 5s’s Touch ID “Fingerprint” Sensor [Video]

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1OFW6Va1m5k


    The Touch ID fingerprint sensor on the iPhone 5S? It’s not limited to just human use. As Darrell Etherington over at Techcrunch has discovered, it works just fine with a cat’s paw too.

    Running his Touch ID sensor through a battery of tests, Etherington discovered that it wasn’t just a fingerprint that could be used to identify a user and unlock an iPhone 5s. Over at Techcrunch, Etherington explains:

    The cat’s paw worked, and while it encountered more frequent failures than did a fingerprint, it was able to unlock the phone again repeatedly when positioned correctly on the sensor. Note that no other paw pads would unlock the device, and that cats essentially have unique “fingerprints” just like people, so this doesn’t make the Touch ID sensor any less secure.

    For the curious, I also tested the 5s fingerprint sensor on the heel of my palm, as well as on the inside of my forearm up around the wrist, and found that I could register and successfully unlock with both skin regions. Again, it was trickier to get the unlock to work consistently, and trying to fool the sensor by using the same part of the body on the opposing limb never worked.

    It’s worth noting that this isn’t an exploit of the Touch ID sensor. It’s working as intended: once paired with a thumbprint, the heel of your palm, or a cat’s paw, only those things will unlock the device.






    9-19-13

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    iPhone 5s & iPhone 5c Get The Teardown Treatment Down Under




    The iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c has just gone on sale in Australia, and the team at iExperts have already gotten their hands on the new devices and given them their first teardown.

    Thanks to all the leaks we’ve been enjoying in recent weeks, many of the components you’ll see below have already been seen before. But if you get a kick out of seeing expensive gadgets being pulled apart — or you just admire Apple’s incredible build quality — then you’re in for a treat.

    The inside of the iPhone 5s and the iPhone 5c look pretty similar at a glance; in fact, the iPhone’s internal layout has remained largely the same since the original device launched in 2007. But of course, the components packed inside each device change each and every time.

    Even the iPhone 5c, which is essentially an iPhone 5 with a plastic back, has an improved 5.73Whr battery, while the iPhone 5s’s is better still at 5.92Whr. iExperts points out that both the iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c batteries are labeled “Apple Japan,” which is a label we haven’t seen before on an iPhone battery.





    iExperts also notes that the latest logic boards inside the new iPhones are narrower then the iPhone 5’s logic board, saving valuable space inside the device. This is what allows those batteries to become ever so slightly wider, and therefore slightly better.

    In the image below, you’ll notice how the iPhone 5s’s iSight camera lens (center) is slightly larger than that of the iPhone 5 (left) and the iPhone 5c (right). That’s thanks to its wider f/2.2 aperture, which lets in more light and improves the quality of photographs — particularly those taken in low-light environments.




    Other changes inside the new iPhones include an improved switch for the sleep/wake button, which should make them more reliable; and of course a new Touch ID sensor inside the iPhone 5s. Customers in Australia will also find a new charger in their box, which is “incredibly compact,” according to iExperts.

    We’re expecting another teardown soon from the guys over at iFixit, which will provide us with more detail on the internals inside Apple’s new iPhones, including the new processors and sensors.






    9-19-13

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    iPhone 5s & 5c get first teardowns revealing fingerprint sensor assembly & new compon



    With Australia, alongside other countries in Asia included in the initial September 20 iPhone launch, the first to get their hands on the iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c, a repair company in the country has just posted the first teardown of the two new iPhones. The iExperts Team out of Australia has taken apart both devices, revealing new components but not yet giving us a look at what we expect will be a Samsung made A7 chip.

    The first thing noticed in the teardown was a new connector for the TouchID fingerprint sensor assembly. Lining up with leaks leading up to the launch of the iPhones, it also found a 5.92Whr battery in the 5s (up from 5.45Whr in the iPhone 5), and a 5.73Whr battery in the iPhone 5c. Internal layouts for the two new iPhones also seem to line up with part leaks we seen in recent months. Interestingly, the site notes that the batteries are stamped with “Apple Japan.”

    Many of the teardown shots below also include an iPhone 5 next to the 5s and 5c for comparison.



















    9-19-13

    9to5mac.com

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    Sen. Al Franken questions Tim Cook on iPhone 5s fingerprint sensor privacy concerns



    U.S. Senator Al Franken, who has questioned Apple and other technology companies several times in the past, just published a letter to Apple CEO Tim Cook questioning the privacy implications of the TouchID fingerprint sensor feature included in Apple’s new iPhone 5s. In the letter (below), Franken says that “important questions remain about how this technology works, Apple’s future plans for this technology, and the legal protections that Apple will afford it,” and requests that Apple explain more in-depth how it’s storing fingerprint data:

    It’s clear to me that Apple has worked hard to secure this technology and implement it responsibly. The iPhone 5S reportedly stores fingerprint data locally “on the chip” and in an encrypted format. It also blocks third-party apps from accessing Touch ID. Yet important questions remain about how this technology works, Apple’s future plans for this technology, and the legal protections that Apple will afford it. I should add that regardless of how carefully Apple implements fingerprint technology, this decision will surely pave the way for its peers and smaller competitors to adopt biometric technology, with varying protections for privacy.

    Franken is asking that Apple answer a number of questions related to how the fingerprint data is collected and stored, but also wants to know Apple’s future plans for the technology. For example, if it has plans to allow third-party developers access to the fingerprint sensor and how it considers fingerprint data related to government requests in legal situations:

    Under American privacy law, law enforcement agencies cannot compel companies to disclose the “contents” of communications without a warrant, and companies cannot share that information with third parties without customer consent. However, the “record[s] or other information pertaining to a subscriber… or customer” can be freely disclosed to any third party without customer consent, and can be disclosed to law enforcement upon issuance of a non-probable cause court order. Moreover, a “subscriber number or identity” can be disclosed to the government with a simple subpoena… Does Apple consider fingerprint data to be the “contents” of communications, customer or subscriber records, or a “subscriber number or identity” as defined in the Stored Communications Act?

    While Apple is yet to issue an official response to Franken, it has published a support document on its website outlining security features of TouchID and explaining some of the safeguards in place:

    Touch ID does not store any images of your fingerprint. It stores only a mathematical representation of your fingerprint. It isn’t possible for your actual fingerprint image to be reverse-engineered from this mathematical representation. iPhone 5s also includes a new advanced security architecture called the Secure Enclave within the A7 chip, which was developed to protect passcode and fingerprint data. Fingerprint data is encrypted and protected with a key available only to the Secure Enclave. Fingerprint data is used only by the Secure Enclave to verify that your fingerprint matches the enrolled fingerprint data. The Secure Enclave is walled off from the rest of A7 and as well as the rest of iOS. Therefore, your fingerprint data is never accessed by iOS or other apps, never stored on Apple servers, and never backed up to iCloud or anywhere else. Only Touch ID uses it and it can’t be used to match against other fingerprint databases.

    As we’ve noted before, Apple also explains that a passcode is required after restarting the device or after a 48 hour period has elapsed without unlocking. In addition, the device will require a passcode after “five unsuccessful fingerprint match attempts.”

    The full letter to Tim Cook is below:



    Dear Mr. Cook:

    I am writing regarding Apple’s recent inclusion of a fingerprint reader on the new iPhone 5S. Apple has long been a leading innovator of mobile technology; I myself own an iPhone. At the same time, while Apple’s new fingerprint reader, Touch ID, may improve certain aspects of mobile security, it also raises substantial privacy questions for Apple and for anyone who may use your products. In writing you on this subject, I am seeking to establish a public record of how Apple has addressed these issues internally and in its rollout of this technology to millions of my constituents and other Americans.

    Too many people don’t protect their smartphones with a password or PIN. I anticipate that Apple’s fingerprint reader will in fact make iPhone 5S owners more likely to secure their smartphones. But there are reasons to think that an individual’s fingerprint is not “one of the best passwords in the world,” as an Apple promotional video suggests.

    Passwords are secret and dynamic; fingerprints are public and permanent. If you don’t tell anyone your password, no one will know what it is. If someone hacks your password, you can change it—as many times as you want. You can’t change your fingerprints. You have only ten of them. And you leave them on everything you touch; they are definitely not a secret. What’s more, a password doesn’t uniquely identify its owner—a fingerprint does. Let me put it this way: if hackers get a hold of your thumbprint, they could use it to identify and impersonate you for the rest of your life.

    It’s clear to me that Apple has worked hard to secure this technology and implement it responsibly. The iPhone 5S reportedly stores fingerprint data locally “on the chip” and in an encrypted format. It also blocks third-party apps from accessing Touch ID. Yet important questions remain about how this technology works, Apple’s future plans for this technology, and the legal protections that Apple will afford it. I should add that regardless of how carefully Apple implements fingerprint technology, this decision will surely pave the way for its peers and smaller competitors to adopt biometric technology, with varying protections for privacy.

    I respectfully request that Apple provide answers to the following questions:

    (1) Is it possible to convert locally-stored fingerprint data into a digital or visual format that can be used by third parties?

    (2) Is it possible to extract and obtain fingerprint data from an iPhone? If so, can this be done remotely, or with physical access to the device?

    (3) In 2011, security researchers discovered that iPhones were saving an unencrypted file containing detailed historical location information on the computers used to back up the device. Will fingerprint data be backed up to a user’s computer?

    (4) Does the iPhone 5S transmit any diagnostic information about the Touch ID system to Apple or any other party? If so, what information is transmitted?

    (5) How exactly do iTunes, iBooks and the App Store interact with Touch ID? What information is collected by those apps from the Touch ID system, and what information is collected by Apple associated with those interactions, including identifiers or hashes related to the fingerprint data?

    (6) Does Apple have any plans to allow any third party applications access to the Touch ID system or its fingerprint data?

    (7) Can Apple assure its users that it will never share their fingerprint data, along with tools or other information necessary to extract or manipulate the iPhone fingerprint data, with any commercial third party?

    (8) Can Apple assure its users that it will never share their fingerprint files, along with tools or other information necessary to extract or manipulate the iPhone fingerprint data, with any government, absent appropriate legal authority and process?

    (9) Under American privacy law, law enforcement agencies cannot compel companies to disclose the “contents” of communications without a warrant, and companies cannot share that information with third parties without customer consent. However, the “record[s] or other information pertaining to a subscriber… or customer” can be freely disclosed to any third party without customer consent, and can be disclosed to law enforcement upon issuance of a non-probable cause court order. Moreover, a “subscriber number or identity” can be disclosed to the government with a simple subpoena. See generally 18 U.S.C. § 2702-2703

    Does Apple consider fingerprint data to be the “contents” of communications, customer or subscriber records, or a “subscriber number or identity” as defined in the Stored Communications Act?

    (10) Under American intelligence law, the Federal Bureau of Investigation can seek an order requiring the production of “any tangible thing[] (including books, records, papers, documents, and other items)” if they are deemed relevant to certain foreign intelligence investigations. See 50 U.S.C. § 1861.
    Does Apple consider fingerprint data to be “tangible things” as defined in the USA PATRIOT Act?

    (11) Under American intelligence law, the Federal Bureau of Investigation can unilaterally issue a National Security Letter that compels telecommunications providers to disclose “subscriber information” or “electronic communication transactional records in its custody or possession.” National Security Letters typically contain a gag order, meaning that recipients cannot disclose that they received the letter. See, e.g., 18 U.S.C. § 2709.
    Does Apple consider fingerprint data to be “subscriber information” or “electronic communication transactional records” as defined in the Stored Communications Act?

    (12) Does Apple believe that users have a reasonable expectation of privacy in fingerprint data they provide to Touch ID?

    Thank you for your time and attention to these questions. I ask that Apple answer these questions within a month of receiving this letter.

    Sincerely,

    Al Franken
    Chairman, Senate Judiciary Subcommittee
    on Privacy, Technology and the Law






    9-20-13

    9to5mac.com

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    iPhone 5s Launch Performance Compared To Other iPhones And Samsung [Chart]



    Apple sold 3 million iPhone 5s and 5c units everyday for the past three days this weekend for the most successful smartphone launch in history. Not only did Apple completely dominate its old sales numbers set by the iPhone 5, but based on this handy chart that Horace Dediu whipped up, Samsung has never even come close to any of the iPhone’s launch day performances.

    Sure the Galaxy S 4 comes close to the iPhone 3G and 3GS sales numbers, but that was over five years ago. Looks like Samsung still has a lot of catching up to to do, and if early morning trading on AAPL shares is any indication, Wall Street agrees.






    9-23-13

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    Apple's Touch ID already bypassed with established 'fake finger' technique



    A hacker group in Germany claims to have defeated Apple's new Touch ID biometric security system by using a modified fingerprint lifting and "fake finger" creation technique.

    In a post to its website on Sunday, the Chaos Computer Club claimed to have bypassed the iPhone 5s' Touch ID sensor hardware, just two days after the smartphone was released on Friday.

    According to a detailed walkthrough of the bypass provided by the group's biometrics hacking team, the iPhone 5s' Touch ID hardware is, in effect, merely a higher resolution version of existing sensors. This means the system can be defeated using common fingerprint lifting techniques, albeit at a more refined level.

    "In reality, Apple's sensor has just a higher resolution compared to the sensors so far. So we only needed to ramp up the resolution of our fake", said a CCC hacker nicknamed Starbug. "As we have said now for more than years, fingerprints should not be used to secure anything. You leave them everywhere, and it is far too easy to make fake fingers out of lifted prints."

    While the process is somewhat complex, the thinking behind it is straightforward. In this case, a high-resolution 2400 dpi photo of a user's fingerprint was harvested from a glass surface using graphite dust or cyanoacrylate (the main ingredient in Super Glue) and a camera. The resulting image was cleaned up and inverted with photo editing software, then laser printed at 1200 dpi onto a transparent sheet.

    To create the fake fingerprint, pink latex milk or white wood glue is laid over the printout and allowed to set. Once cured, the dummy can be peeled off the transparency, breathed on to produce a thin layer of moisture, and applied to a finger. This will grant access to a Touch ID protected device, CCC claims.

    A video of the unlocking process was uploaded to YouTube:



    VIDEO BELOW



    "We hope that this finally puts to rest the illusions people have about fingerprint biometrics. It is plain stupid to use something that you can´t change and that you leave everywhere every day as a security token", said CCC spokesman Frank Rieger. "The public should no longer be fooled by the biometrics industry with false security claims. Biometrics is fundamentally a technology designed for oppression and control, not for securing everyday device access."

    It should be noted that Apple never claimed Touch ID was a new technology, nor did the company say the method was foolproof. As seen above, there are many caveats in the production of a "fake finger," from latent fingerprint quality to digitization and printing. In addition, a would-be thief would need access to the iPhone itself after the fake is produced.

    Also not taken into account is Apple's Find My iPhone app, which allows a lost or stolen phone to be wiped remotely. This leaves the window for breaking into the 5s very small, and would likely thwart all but the most dedicated criminals.

    Apple's Touch ID is the company's first attempt at including a biometric security method in its consumer products. The technology comes from AuthenTec, a biometrics firm specializing in fingerprint hardware, that Apple purchased in 2012 for $356 million.

    The extent to which Apple plans to incorporate biometric technology is unclear, though as it stands, Touch ID is used to unlock the iPhone 5s and make iTunes purchases. Third parties do not have access to the sensor's API, but that may change if the tech becomes a larger part of the iOS ecosystem.






    9-23-13

    appleinsider.com

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