iPhone 5 Tips and Tricks & Info.

This is a discussion on iPhone 5 Tips and Tricks & Info. within the iPhone forums, part of the iPod, iPhone, iPad Forum category; Dumb but easy trick . I have all the WEP/WAP codes to places /friends (Including mine ) I go to saved in Notes , so ...

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  1. #21
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    Dumb but easy trick .
    I have all the WEP/WAP codes to places /friends (Including mine ) I go to saved in Notes , so if needed , I only have to copy and paste.
    When someone comes to my place , I send them my code ahead of time so they can do the same..it avoids me the headache of having to dictate it .
    MBP 13' Mid-2010 Mavericks
    iPhone 5
    iPad rMini 32 GB + Cellular

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  3. #22
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    iPhone 101: Switching sound off (or down)



    Today's iPhone 101 is all about audio volume. You may think that the volume toggle and the mute switch on the side of your iPhone, iPad or iPod touch are the beginning and end of noise control, but it turns out there's more to the iOS sound story.

    You can get some volume management by plugging in a pair of headphones; that mutes the main speaker but also redirects your primary output to the headphones. When placed on your desk, you still may hear tiny bits of sound from the ear pieces. Having headphones connected does not affect the sounds from system alarms or incoming phone calls -- those still hit the main speaker.

    The mute switch on the side of the iPhone will generally cut off all outward ringing, audio alerts and other noisy bits, with one notable and newsworthy exception: alarms that have been set will still be played audibly, regardless of the mute switch position. Most consider this a reasonable and long-standing UX compromise by cellphone makers (if not, the alarms would be critically unreliable; many people would simply forget to unmute their phones at night before bed), but there are plenty of dissenters.

    Here are other ways you can limit your device's volume.

    Adjust the Ringer and Alerts volume. In Settings > Sounds, you'll find a separate Ringers and Alerts volume slider, which you can adjust to your liking. If you set this too low, your alarm settings in the Clock app may not wake you up and you may miss incoming calls. An optional Change with Buttons toggle links your alerts/ringer volume to the hardware controls on the side of your device.

    Two further options offer an alternative to your ringer. Select Settings > Sounds > Vibrate on Ring to transform alerts to vibrations. Enabling General > Accessibility > LED Flash for Alerts lets you "hear" your incoming calls with your eyes. This option adds a visual alert with your phone's camera flash (which could be made more visible with some additional case technology).

    Adjust the Siri volume. Stray touches on your phone or new iPad Home button may invoke Siri by mistake, and the double-chirp that starts a Siri session. Siri uses its own volume settings, separate from normal speaker output, alerts, and ringers. To mute Siri, press and hold the Home button to launch Siri -- with the Siri microphone icon visible, use the hardware controls to adjust the volume down.

    Alert Sounds. If you have the patience, you can currently disable notification alert sounds on an app-by-app basis in Settings > Notification > App Name > Sounds. Choose your ringtones, text tones, and other normal alerts in Settings > Sounds.

    Volume Limit. Although this isn't an outward audio feature, many parents choose to set a cap on the music playback volume for a child's iPhone or iPod touch to prevent hearing damage. The limit setting (and an optional lock password) can be found in Settings > Music > Volume Limit.

    Do Not Disturb. iOS 6 will introduce a Do Not Disturb feature in Settings that will disable updates arriving in your notification center and incoming phone calls. You'll be able to adjust the settings to allow incoming calls from selected people and/or a repeat-call override for emergencies.

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    iPhone 101: Using iOS accessibility to make text larger



    Welcome to iPhone 101, the series that explains the basics of iPhone operation. This time, its making tiny text easier to read using the accessibility features in iOS.

    Following Stevie Wonder's high praise of the accessibility features found in iOS, we thought we'd take a closer look at some of the features available to make using the iPhone a whole lot easier for those who are visually impaired.

    One of the first places to start, when wanting to make what's on your iPhone easier to read, is to make the text larger in four of iOS's major apps: Mail, Calender, Contacts and Notes. To access this feature go to Settings > General > Accessibility. From there you want to tap Large Text and select the text size that best suits your needs. The selection is from off to a rather large 56pt. The text size you select will determine the standard text size for all the text found in those apps.

    Unfortunately, this feature doesn't reach across the entire OS, nor does it affect third-party apps. However, most well developed third-party apps will have a setting to edit the size of the text in the app, this feature is usually found in the settings of the app.

    You can also apply the Large Text feature to the iPad too by following the same instructions.


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    iPhone 101: Recovering deleted voicemails



    This time, its retrieving a deleted voice mail message.

    One of the great features of the iPhone -- that is, one that is actually related to having phone conversations -- is Visual Voicemail. So long as your carrier (network provider) supports it, Visual Voicemail allows you to see your voicemail messages, similar to a list of text messages or emails. You can decide which messages you want to listen to, when you want to listen to them and scrub through the message to the important part you want to hear. In Apple's own words, "Visual Voicemail on iPhone is still the biggest breakthrough in voicemail since, well, voicemail."

    It certainly has changed the way I use voicemail. Gone are the days of dialing in to a voicemail box and laboriously listening to all your messages in a row! But there's one unsung, often overlooked feature of Visual Voicemail: recovering deleted voicemails.

    If you've deleted a voicemail message that you really wish you hadn't (say, the pin code for the alarm system at a guest house you're staying at), simply swipe down your row of messages, all the way to the bottom of the list, and tap on "Deleted Messages." So long as you haven't come here before and tapped "Clear All," all the messages you've ever deleted on your iPhone will be stored here. To recover your deleted voicemail, simply search for it in the list, select it and tap on "undelete." The voicemail will pop into your normal voicemail list ready for you to listen to again.


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    Fix dings/dents/scratches on your iPhone 5 with this $99 original rear panel



    One of the biggest controversies surrounding the launch of the iPhone 5 has been the light scratching and chipping that some users have reported witnessing on the device’s coated aluminium backside. Apple’s Marketing Senior Vice President Phil Schiller called the scratching “normal” for aluminium products, as scratching on the coated surface reveals the natural silver color underneath making it more noticeable to users than an all-glass design. There have even been reports that quality control issues related to the scratching have lead to shortages and troubles in Apple’s supply chain.

    While Apple is standing behind the design for the most part (they will swap your iPhone 5 for a new one if it’s scratched out of the box), there is another solution on the market for your scratched iPhone 5. iPhone5mod, the same people behind one of the first Lightning connector docks on the market, is today releasing rear panel replacements that it claimed are 100 percent original.

    The standalone rear case is apparently “the same thing you are seeing and touching in your iPhone 5 right now.” It would not be all that shocking considering China-based iPhone5mod also claimed to have “original Lightning controller chips from Apple’s supplier” for its iPhone 5 dock.

    The replacement part is available for $99 now in both black and white from iPhone5mod.com. Apple has been quick to issue takedown notices for the company’s products in the past, so there is a possibility these won’t last long.


    10-19-12


    9to5mac.com


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    Add a “Dial Extension” Button to Contacts on iPhone



    Though you’ve long been able to add automatically dialed extensions to contacts on the iPhone, the newest versions of iOS handle extensions much more intelligently, allowing you to create a “Dial Extension” button to any specific contact. That extension dialer can be activated manually, making the navigation of telephony menus infinitely easier, here’s how to quickly add this to a contact:

    Open Contacts and tap the contact name to add the extension to, then tap the “Edit” button
    Tap the phone number entry, place the cursor at the end, then tap the “+*#” button to access additional options
    Choose “wait” then enter the extension afterwards, it will add a semicolon and the extension afterwards to the address appearing like so: 1-888-555-5555;123
    Tap “Done” and exit out of contacts
    Now dial the contact to discover a “Dial 123″ button has appeared, tap that whenever you want to dial the extension
    The extensions can also be added from a Mac in Contacts (Address Book) by adding a semicolon to numbers followed by an extension, just be sure to sync it through the same iCloud account or it won’t go over to the iPhone.

    Anyone who frequently uses extensions to reach specific people at an office, or anyone who has battled an automated phone system knows how useful this can be. You can even set a string of numbers, though the Dial button remains the same.

    10-29-12


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    Create a Playlist from Music Directly on the iPhone



    You no longer need to create music playlists in iTunes and then sync them to an iPhone, iPad, or iPod, because the entire process can be done easily directly in iOS itself. The next time you leave home without creating a playlist, just make one quickly on the go by doing the following:

    Launch Music in iOS and tap the Playlists tab
    Tap on “Add Playlist…” and give the playlist a name
    Now sort through the song list and tap the blue (+) icon on each song to add to the playlist
    Tap “Done” when finished, and enjoy the playlist
    You can also edit playlists and change the playlist order of songs, clear the contents of playlists, or delete the playlist completely.

    If you do connect to a computer later, these playlists should sync fine with iTunes on a desktop PC or Mac. If it doesn’t happen automatically because of your management settings, you can always export the playlist manually to transfer it over to your computer too.

    This feature has been around since iOS 5, so just about all iOS devices should be able to do it.

    10-30-12


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    Shoot Vertical Panorama Photos on iPhone



    The iPhone’s excellent panorama mode allows for easy vertical panoramic shots as well, perfect for taking pictures of tall trees, waterfalls, buildings, or anything else that is taller than the standard range provides. To shoot a vertical panoramic picture, all you need to do is open Panorama as usual, then rotate the iPhone sideways:

    Open Camera, then tap “Options” and select “Panorama”
    Once in Panorama, simply rotate iPhone into horizontal orientation
    Shoot the panorama photo as usual, tapping “Done” when complete
    Panorama is smart enough to save the resulting vertical shot into the proper vertical orientation, so you won’t need to rotate the image after the fact.

    If you’re new to Panorama mode, don’t miss some tips for taking the best panoramic photos with the iPhone. You’ll need iOS 6 or later to have the feature on newer iPhone models.


    11-8-12


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    How to Determine if iPhone is GSM or CDMA



    Most of us geekier folks instantly know if our iPhones are CDMA or GSM models, but not everyone pays as much attention to the largely insignificant technical details of their phones. Not to worry, it’s extremely easy to find out if an iPhone is GSM or CDMA, all you need to do is look at the model number of the device.

    To find out if the phone is CDMA or GSM, flip the iPhone over and look at the back. Locate the string number alongside “Model” and compare it against this list:

    iPhone GSM Model Numbers:

    iPhone 5: A1428
    iPhone 4S: A1387 (* dual band CDMA & GSM world phone)
    iPhone 4S: A1531 (GSM China)
    iPhone 4: A1332
    iPhone 3GS: A1325 (GSM China)
    iPhone 3GS: A1303
    iPhone 3G: A1324 (GSM China)
    iPhone 3G: A1241
    iPhone 1: A1203

    iPhone CDMA Model Numbers:

    iPhone 5: A1429
    iPhone 4S: A1387 (* dual band CDMA & GSM world phone)
    iPhone 4: A1349

    Knowing the model numbers is guaranteed and is pretty quick, and it’s also the best way to determine what model an iPhone is that won’t turn on. For customers in the USA, another easy way to tell if it’s GSM or CDMA is just to find out what cell carrier the iPhone uses. AT&T is always GSM, T-Mobile is always GSM, while Verizon and Sprint are always CDMA. You can also generally assume that if it uses a SIM card to get online, it’s a GSM iPhone, though some iPhone models like the iPhone 4S have both CDMA and GSM capabilities. The cell carrier isn’t always a reliable method though, because sometimes an iPhone won’t turn on, is out of battery or just plain dead, or it could even be a dualband world phone like the 4S.

    What if the iPhone Model Number is Rubbed Off?

    You can also get the same Model number information by connecting any iPhone to a computer with iTunes. If that isn’t an option, open Settings, tap General then “About”, and look under “Network” or “Carrier” instead.

    Why Does it Matter?

    For the vast majority of iPhone users, it doesn’t, they’ll never need to know or care about their device being GSM or CDMA. This is really mostly helpful to those who use IPSW (IPSW is iOS firmware, basically the iPhone system software) to either update a device manually, for jailbreaking purposes, or for restoring a device in the event of a significant software failure. In that case, knowing which model a device is important when downloading IPSW files for iPhones.

    11-15-12


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    iPhone 101: Switch Panorama direction



    Want to go right-to-left when you create a panorama on your iPhone? There's a tap for that. Yes, if, for whatever reason, the left-to-right default is getting old, just tap on the arrow that appears on screen. The arrow will flip, allowing you to pan the other way while you are creating your ultra-pixel masterpiece.

    The panorama feature was added to iOS 6 and requires either the new iPhone 5 or an iPhone 4S. Remember, that if you take a full panorama the image could be more than 16 megabytes, but if you send it from the phone it will be scaled down. Be sure to transfer the original to your computer to keep the high resolution version if you want it.

    Check the gallery and you can see the arrow going either way.


    11-17-12

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