iPhone Accessories

This is a discussion on iPhone Accessories within the iPhone forums, part of the iPod, iPhone, iPad Forum category; I found a great place to get mophie cases 25% off with free shipping. Recommend to all because that where I got mine. DiscountPhoneGear .com...

Page 4 of 11 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 104
Like Tree5Likes

Thread: iPhone Accessories

  1. #31
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1
    Member #
    5690

    Iphone 5 Mophie Cases

    I found a great place to get mophie cases 25% off with free shipping. Recommend to all because that where I got mine. DiscountPhoneGear .com

  2. Ads

    Posts
    Many

  3. #32
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    15
    Member #
    5705
    Came across this new accessory this afternoon. I wonder if it would be beneficial to have in homes as well as offices so you technically won't have to have a separate land line anymore.
    http://www.geeky-gadgets.com/shorete...ne-2013-05-07/

  4. #33
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    316 times

    Keyprop Looks Like A Key, Props Up Your iPhone [Kickstarter]



    If you’re going to make an iPhone stand that slips onto a keyring, you may as well make it look like a key, amirite? Right? Hello?

    Ok, so that part of the design is a little dumb, but the Keyprop itself is pretty ingenious, especially the way it manages to work with both the iPhones 4 and 5.

    The Keyprop works like a key, and can even be used whilst still on the ring. At the business end there are two prongs. One slides into the Lightning hole of the iPhone 5, prevented from turning by the simple fact that both it and the hole are not round.

    The other prong is round, and slips into the jack socket of the iPhone 4/S, using the flat Lightning prong as a prop to stop it from twisting in the hole.

    Clever, huh?

    Still, I’m not sold on the whole fake key design. It’s like skeuomorphism in real life (I’ll wait for you to parse that one). I also think that $15 is a little steep for something you might find in the corner dime store. Then again, maybe I can make one of my own form some of the junk I have lying around here…


    5-8-13

    Source

  5. #34
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    316 times

    Review: AL13 raises the bar for iPhone bumper design



    Designed by m has managed to craft one of the most exquisite and well designed iPhone bumpers we've ever seen — in fact "bumper" seems too unrefined a descriptor — but one flaw could mar for some people what is otherwise a nearly perfect companion to Apple's smartphone.

    The brainchild of Designed by m founder Lester Mapp, AL13 is the culmination of many days in the lab and one immensely popular Kickstarter campaign. Demand was so high that AL13 quadrupled its funding goal on the way to becoming the highest backed iPhone bumper in Kickstarter history, quite the goal for those not familiar with the crowd funding site and its many fledgling iOS device accessories.

    Mapp told AppleInsider the mantra of his company is to create products with a "clean, simple but awesome design." Sounds a bit like something Apple's Senior Vice President of Industrial Design Jonathan Ive would say.

    "When we designed AL13 we wanted to make something that looked like it came with the iPhone," Mapp said. "We were pretty anti-case when it came to our own iPhones. Why would anyone want to cover up anything as awesome as the iPhone?"

    Indeed.


    Design



    Upon receipt of AL13, a clever homage to aluminum's symbol and atomic number, we were impressed at how closely the thin piece of metal mimicked the shape of the iPhone it was built to protect. For reference, the model under review is AL13 for iPhone 5, in slate black. Designed by m also has an identical offering scaled down for the iPhone 4/4S.

    Most bumpers on the market today tend to stand out, at times intentionally so, with bold colors and designs that seem to contrast and diminish the sleek profile of the original device. Mapp agrees.

    "[W]e found other cases were doing just that; either covering the phone up, or changing its silhouette," he said. "AL13 is slim, extremely lightweight and built to blend in with the look of the iPhone."

    Design cues were obviously cribbed from the iPhone 5, like chamfered edges and an anodized, lightly textured surface. The finished product lends itself nicely to the handset.




    Using aerospace-grade aluminum, weight is kept down to around 14 grams, a specification Designed by m's website says is nearly half that of the average bumper. The iPhone 5's 112 grams, said by many to be surprisingly light, is veritably obese in contrast. When taking AL13 out of the box, its heft, or lack thereof, was noticeable. The bumper is very light.

    Despite the weight, AL13 is substantially rigid. Taking care of padding is a strip of dense anti-scuff rubber material which lines the inner walls. The medium also serves to keep the iPhone snugly in place during use.


    Performance



    With all the prettiness going on, one could easily overlook what is probably the most ingenious attachment methods on the market. Instead of using screws, snaps, or other cumbersome forms of installation, AL13 harnesses aluminum's ability to undergo flexure. Simply lift the edge of rear cover, slide it out of the main chassis, slip in an iPhone, and replace. The assembly glides back into position with a satisfying "snick."




    Despite being easy to put on and take off, the attachment mechanism stays in place when dropped. We were unable to force the bumper off with drop tests onto wood and tile from three feet to five feet. The front and rear of the bumper are raised just enough to keep any exposed areas of the phone away from the ground.

    "The initial design featured an almost invisible rear cover, but we found that in cases of falls it wasn’t staying in place, putting the phone at risk. So we altered the design slightly," Mapp said. "We made the rear cover a little wider, not wide enough to mess with our goal of not covering up the phone, but enough to increase its stability and eliminate the problem of it coming loose during falls."

    Tolerances are extremely tight, though we found that the iPhone would shift back and forth a touch if the included protective backing film was not used. No such slippage or rattling occurred with the film in place.

    Importantly, AL13 doesn't take away from the iPhone's thin design, adding just the right amount of girth to the handset. Buttons are easily reachable, as are the Lightning connector and headphone jack.




    Cell Reception



    AL13 is beautiful and functional, but there is one caveat. Because the bumper is made from aluminum, it blocks radio signals. In our testing, we found a decrease in reception strength of about -20 dBm, depending on proximity to the nearest cell tower. This can bring overall reception down to around two or three bars as represented by iOS "signal bar" mapping.

    While the iPhone 5 is honed from similar aluminum billet, the handset has four breaks, or "windows," in its unibody chassis, through which radio waves can pass. These are filled with a dielectric material, like plastic, which is non-conductive and allows for the phone's dynamic two-antenna setup to communicate effectively.

    AL13 masks these windows somewhat, but doesn't create a conductive bridge over the gap thanks to the rubber lining. If it did, reception would be much worse.




    Mapp said that preliminary testing found signal loss of 5 to 10 percent; not enough to cause dropped calls. Investigation into new materials is already underway, with an ultimate goal of making the bumper, as well as future designs, radio transparent.

    We didn't experience dropped calls, but battery life was impacted slightly. Our guess is the iPhone has to boost power to the radio module in order to maintain acceptable signal strength. Though not unacceptable, some power users who are already teetering on the edge of running their iPhones dry in less than a day may find the added burden worrisome.

    That said, we believe the flaw would go largely unnoticed by the average consumer. In some cases, especially with the iPhone 4, the bumper may actually increase reception. As seen in the notorious "antennagate" fiasco, putting a finger over the dielectric filled gap can drop reception down to nil.


    Bottom line



    With a product like AL13, it's difficult to attach a star rating. The bumper is beautifully designed and executed, but the hit to cell reception is definitely a problem. In the end, we based the final score on attributes a well implemented bumper should display: protection, aesthetics and ease of use.

    As a majority of readers will have trouble seeing the difference in cell reception and battery life, only one half star was deducted from the final tally. It should be noted, however, that more discerning users may need to look elsewhere, beyond wraparound aluminum bumper designs.

    AL13 lives in that intersection where beauty and function meet. It takes special attention to detail and knowledge of craft to end up with a product like this.

    Bottom line: many accessory makers never even reach the level at which Designed by m started with AL13.




    At a price of $79.99, AL13 is expensive, but some will find it worth the premium. Those interested can pick one up at Designed by m's website.

    Score: 4 out of 5




    Pros

    Incredible, lightweight design
    Exacting fit and finish
    Low tolerance build, high quality materials

    Cons

    Causes reception/battery drain issues
    Expensive for some


    5-18-13

    appleinsider.com

  6. #35
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    316 times

    1970s PanAm Life Rafts Repurposed As iPhone Cases



    Last seen wrapping the iPhone in chopped-up fire hoses, the folks at Station Supply Co have expanded (pun most definitely intended) into recycled airliner life rafts. That’s right: now you can cover your iPhone or iPad with a swatch snipped from a genuine 1970s-era PanAm life raft.

    Things were different on commercial airlines back in the 70s. Flight attendants were called stewardesses, men could smoke, and instead of video screens, seat backs contained automatic spankers which would give screaming children a stout whack across the head to shut them up. Happy days indeed.

    Now, we have to put up with absurd “security” procedures and stand in giant microwave ovens before we even get on the plane. Worse, I have been forced to ditch my hip flask full of scotch and resort to a plastic bottle of colorless gin which I pass off as “bowel medicine.” Human dignity isn’t what it used to be.

    As we shake ourselves out of that nostalgic reverie, let us take comfort in the knowledge that a part of that proud past is being preserved, by chopping up old life rafts and turning them into rear skins for iPhones and iPads, tough and light protectives shields for our gadgets.

    The irony is, of course, that the 1970s man would never have been seen dead recycling anything. That crap was for soap-dodging hippies. No, real men would have burned these rubbery tributes to the oil industry and fed the smoke to rare albino pandas, or something. And they would have left their cars out in the parking garage with their engines running while they did it.




    5-20-13

    Source

  7. #36
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    15
    Member #
    5705
    The worst iPad accessories ? Ever | Digital Crave - Yahoo! came across this today on Yahoo and it gave me a good laugh! There are some pretty interesting accessories out there!

  8. #37
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    316 times

    Inteliscope Turns Your iPhone Into The World’s Most Useful Rifle Scope



    You may assume that there’s little use for a fragile smartphone on the battlefield, but you’d be completely wrong. The Inteliscope is a new iPhone accessory unlike anything you’ve ever seen before that turns your device into an intelligent scope for your rifle.

    No, not a toy rifle. A real rifle.

    The Inteliscope is “the premier tactical rifle adapter,” according to its makers. It combines a tactical rail mount that sits on top of your rifle with an iOS app that delivers “critical ballistics and environmental insight to the shooter in real time.”

    It’s compatible with any firearm that uses a Picatinny (Mil-STD-1913) or Weaver tactical rail, and some of its features include a ruggedized tactile rubber finish, adjustable mount position, support for both portrait and landscape orientations, and a protective case for portability.

    But it’s in the app where the Inteliscope really shines. It lets you pick custom crosshairs, offers 5x digital zoom, records video from the shooter’s perspective, and provides ballistics and firearm data. It also utilizes the iPhone’s built-in compass, GPS, and LED to provide a flashlight.

    The Inteliscope, along with your iPhone, really is the ultimate rifle scope. I mean, I’m no expert on rifle scopes, but I’m guessing there aren’t many that record video and provide all the information the InteliScope does while you’re on the battlefield.

    The Inteliscope is priced at $69.99, and it comes in three models — one for the iPod touch, another for the iPhone 5, and one for the iPhone 4 and iPhone 4S. It’s scheduled to launch next month, and you can pre-order yours now from Inteliscopes.com.


    5-22-13

    Source

  9. #38
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    316 times

    Xistera iPhone 5 Multitool Does Everything. EVERYTHING


    The obvious thing to say about the XiStera is to call it the "“Swiss Army Knife” of iPhone 5 accessories. Leaving aside for a second the fact that, if all the Swiss Army is bringing to the fight is that little knife, it’s no wonder it refuses to play in any wars, let’s make a better analogy for the Xistera. It’s like a Glif crossed with a Pulltaps corkscrew.

    The Xistera Really is impressively utilitarian. It works as a wrap for headphones, a stand for the iPhone, a magnetic mount for those annoying magnetic lenses, a keychain, a tripod adapter, an accessory cold-shoe (for lights and mics) and – yes – a bottle opener.

    It’s a Kickstarter project, but as it was funded in like five minutes we should be fairly confident that it’ll be made available. And you can even buy this ultimate accessory with its own accessories: currently the XiStera can be had for $35 along with wide-angle, macro and fisheye lenses.





    5-24-13

    Source

  10. #39
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    316 times

    Cradle attachment turns Apple's iPhone into handheld biosensor



    Demonstrating again the versatility of the device, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a cradle and app that turns Apple's iPhone into a powerful biosensor in the vein of Star Trek's fabled tricorders.

    By aligning a series of lenses and filters with the iPhone's camera, the researchers have made Apple's bestselling smartphone capable of detecting a wide range of toxins, proteins, bacteria, viruses, and other molecules. In total, the attachment contains roughly $200 worth of components, but it is comparable in power to hefty and expensive laboratory equipment, and its handheld nature makes for easy transportation, according to the University of Illinois' press release (via Engadget).

    The researchers believe the device could see a wide range of uses, from mapping the spread of pathogens to providing inexpensive medical diagnostic tests in the field or contamination checks in the food processing chain.

    "Smartphones are making a big impact on our society," research team leader Brian Cunningham said. "And they have really powerful computing capability and imaging. A lot of medical conditions might be monitored very inexpensively and non-invasively using mobile platforms like phones."

    The biosensor leverages a photonic crystal, which is somewhat like a mirror that reflects only one wavelength of light. Biological elements attaching to the photonic crystal will cause the reflected color to shift to a longer wavelength, allowing for detection of pathogens, proteins, cells, DNA and more.

    The team has already demonstrated the device in work sensing an immune system protein, but they say it can be calibrated to detect any type of biological molecule or cell type. The team is also working on tests that can detect toxins in harvested corn and soybeans.

    The group received a grant from the National Science Foundation aimed at expanding the applications of their sensor. They are also working to develop tests that can monitor iron and vitamin A deficiencies in expecting mothers and children. A version of the sensor for Android phones is also said to be in the works.

    Doctors and researchers around the world are much enamored of Apple's popular smartphone, and they continually find a range of applications for the device, with some going so far as to call it "the future of medicine." As the iPhone becomes increasingly popular in the field of medicine, at least, it is running up against some regulatory obstacles, as the increasing power and applicability of the handheld computer brings it into conflict with existing standards on what can be used for which medical purposes.


    5-27-13

    appleinsider.com

  11. #40
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    316 times

    Apple Begins Offering In-Store iPhone 5 Display Replacements for $149




    As part of a shift to lower repair costs, Apple has begun replacing iPhone 5 screens at its retail locations. The new display replacement service is priced at $149 and can be purchased with or without AppleCare+.

    Changes to Apple's repair policies first surfaced last month, where a town hall session revealed that Apple would begin in-house repairs of displays in June in an effort to save approximately $1 billion per year.

    MacRumors heard from a tipster this morning that the new repair policy had been implemented and the changes have since been confirmed in a forum post from iPhone repair site Quick iFix. The repairs are available for cracked displays as well as screens that experience multitouch issues.

    Quick iFix notes that Apple's $149 repair cost is competitive, causing the site to change its own repair costs. Quick iFix charged $174.99 for a display replacement in early May, but began offering repairs for $139.99 a few days later.

    Apple's new display repairs are in line with AppleCare+ pricing, which costs $99 up front and then $49 for each replacement. The repair service is a more affordable alternative for iPhone users who opted not to purchase AppleCare+, as iPhone replacement previously cost $229.

    Apple is expected to roll out additional in-house repair options in July, offering repairs of the iPhone's camera, sleep/wake buttons, and logic boards. Additional changes to AppleCare are also reportedly in the works, with Apple rumored to be switching to a subscription based plan tied to customers rather than individual devices.


    6-3-13

    www.macrumors.com

Page 4 of 11 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 ... LastLast

Remove Ads

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-05-2012, 03:36 PM
  2. The Thunderbolt Accessories of CES 2012
    By sparkyscott21 in forum Apple News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-14-2012, 06:47 PM

Contact Us
Back to top