New iMacs NEWS !!

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    New iMacs NEWS !!






    According to Apple retail contacts, Apple’s thinner, redesigned 21.5-inch iMacs have begun arriving in small quantities to select U.S.-based Apple Stores, not to all stores, ahead of the Friday, November 30th launch. It is possible that stores that have yet to receive shipments will see their deliveries during the day tomorrow.

    The new 21.5-inch iMac will be available to order through Apple’s online store tomorrow as well per Apple’s announcement earlier this week.

    Apple CEO Tim Cook previously said there would be iMac shortages into the new year:

    On the iMac we’ll be constrained for the full quarter in a significant way… there will be a short amount of time to manufacturer and ramp those and i expect demand to be robust… we will have a significant shortage

    Additionally, readers in Australia share that they have managed to purchase the computers at Australian stores this morning (seen in the image above). However, the new iMac is not on sale through the Australian online Apple Store yet.

    The new 27-inch iMac will go on sale in December.

    The new models include an all-new design with a complex manufacturing process, improved screen design, and a much thinner and light form-factor. The computer lacks an optical drive to make this happen.

    11-29-12


    9to5mac.com


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    First new iMacs roll out to customers in Australia

    Apple on Friday kicked off sales of its totally redesigned iMac all-in-one desktop, and customers in Australia are among the first to get their hands on Apple's newest all-in-one desktop.


    AppleInsider reader Ben managed to snag a 21.5-inch iMac just minutes after the computer launched in Apple Stores and authorized resellers on Friday local Australia time.

    A quick check with various Australian retail locations found iMac supply was unsurprisingly concentrated at stores in larger cities like Sydney, while smaller outlets such as Canberra had yet to receive their allotments. This is in line with a statement from Apple CEO Tim Cook, who noted that there would be a "significant shortage" of iMacs in the fourth quarter.

    Apple announced on Tuesday that it would be launching the revamped iMac on Friday, Nov. 30, just making the November ship-by date promised when the device was unveiled in October.

    Starting tomorrow, the 21.5-inch model will be available through Apple's online and brick-and-mortar stores, as well as authorized dealers. Apple will also open up orders for the 27-inch model on through its online storefront, however those units won't ship until December.

    The 21.5-inch iMac features a 2.7-gigahertz quad-core Intel Core i5 processor and Nvidia GeForce GT 640M graphics for a suggested retail price of $1,299. A faster 2.9-gigahertz model will be offered for $1,499.

    The larger 27-inch iMac will have a 2.9-gigahertz quad-core Intel Core i5 and GeForce GTX 660M graphics for $1,799, while the 3.2-gigahertz model comes with GTX 675MX graphics and will cost $1,999.




    11-29-12


    appleinsider.com


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    Attention Christmas shoppers: 27-inch iMac ship times slip to 3-4 weeks from 2-3 week



    According to Apple’s online store, the new 27-inch iMacs are now scheduled to ship in 3-4 weeks. That will make a Christmas delivery even more difficult (and unlikely) compared to the 2-3 week shipping times that Apple quoted this morning. The 21.5 inch models are still quoted as shipping in 1-3 business days.


    11-30-12


    9to5mac.com


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    New iMac Benchmarks Show 10-25% Improvement Over Previous Generation



    Primate Labs today posted a summary of the new iMac benchmarks hitting the company's Geekbench Browser, showing fairly strong performance increases over the previous generation of machines. The analysis focuses on the 21.5-inch models, as the 27-inch models are not launching for several more weeks, and the latest high-end 21.5-inch model scores nearly 25% higher than its 2011 counterpart and even bests the high-end 27-inch model from last year by nearly 10%.

    The report also pits the new 21.5-inch iMac against the current generations of Apple's other two desktop lines, the Mac mini and Mac Pro. The comparison to the Mac mini reveals that users can achieve nearly the same performance as the mid-range iMac by purchasing a high-end Mac mini, although customers would obviously have to supply their own displays and other peripherals.

    What's interesting here, though, is how the quad-core Core i5 iMacs perform compared to the quad-core Core i7 Mac minis. Since Core i7 has hyper-threading technology (and the Core i5 does not), it can execute more instructions at once, leading to higher performance.

    Here this means that the mid-range Mac mini is faster than the mid-range iMac that's almost twice the price. True, you do get a display and a discrete GPU with the iMac, but these Geekbench results show how powerful the new Mac mini is despite its size.
    As for the Mac Pro, which is still stuck on older-generation processors rather than adopting Intel's Sandy Bridge E chips, the new iMac is now on par with all but the high-end 12-core Mac Pro models.

    As for the new 27-inch iMac, a handful of Geekbench results have already appeared in the database running a special Build 12C2037 of OS X 10.8.2. The results indicate that an early benchmark that appeared in mid-May was indeed accurate and indicate that the new high-end 27-inch model will outperform its 2011 counterpart by nearly 15%.

    11-30-12


    www.macrumors.com


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    New iMac Teardown Photos

    The new iMac is going on sale around the world on Today, November 30th. In Australia, Ben Pasternak was able to walk into his local Apple Store and buy one.

    Meanwhile, Japanese site Kodawarisan has posted teardown photos showing the innards of the thin new machine.

















    The new iMac tapers to a 5mm thin edge along the sides, requiring the use of a special welding technique to achieve the design.

    The 21.5" iMac will go on sale today in the U.S. both in retail stores and in the online Apple store with immediate availability. The 27-inch model will be available for pre-order but won't ship until December. Stock is expected to be tight throughout 2012.


    11-30-12


    www.macrumors.com


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    Apple's new 27" iMac boasts up to 54% performance improvement over predecessor

    Benchmarks for Apple's redesigned 27- and 21.5-inch iMac models are now available, showing significant performance increases over the previous-generation models.






    Among the first to get their hands on the 27-inch iMac was CNet, which published its review of the big-screen model on Friday. The 27-inch 2012 iMac won't become publicly available until later in December, with Apple's online store currently advertising estimated shipping times of two to three weeks.

    In their tests, the new high-end 27-inch iMac, with a 3.4-gigahertz Core i7 processor, scored 7.49 points in a multi-core rendering Cinebench test. That bested the 4.85 score of the May 2011 iMac with 3.1-gigahertz Core i5 CPU by more than 54 percent.

    The new hybrid Fusion Drive also offered major performance gains in iTunes encoding, as the new 27-inch iMac took 52 seconds in their test, compared with 86 seconds in the previous-generation model.

    An image processing test with Photoshop also reduced time necessary from 236 seconds in the 2011 model to 199 seconds in the redesigned 2012 model.

    Wider tests of the 27-inch iMac are not yet available with the hardware not on sale to the public, but a number of tests with the 21.5-inch variety were published on Friday by Primate Labs, maker of the Geekbench testing software. The late 2012 21.5-inch iMac with a 3.1-gigahertz Intel Core i7 processor scored 12,447, which was about 9 percent better than the mid-2011 27-inch iMac, and nearly 25 percent faster than the identically sized 21.5-inch model from last year.

    In its review, CNet called the 27-inch model an elite all-in-one desktop that makes it one of the best available on the market. The publication gave the new iMac a score of 4 out of 5 stars.

    "This is a computer for serious, performance-driven users, particularly those who need a high-resolution display, and fast graphics and disk performance," they concluded.

    The 21.5-inch iMac is now available to order from Apple, while the 27-inch model is available for preorder. Official Apple authorized resellers are also offering preorders for both models, which are expected to be in limited supply this holiday.


    11-30-12


    appleinsider.com


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    Early iMac Reviews Praise Design and Display Enhancements



    With Apple's new iMac going on sale today, the first reviews of the new machine are starting to arrive. The reviews come alongside some early teardown photos and benchmarks offering an early glimpse at Apple's redesigned flagship desktop.

    CNET has a thorough review of the 27-inch model, which won't be shipping to customers for several more weeks, noting that while the design is the major change to the machine, iterative improvements on already impressive performance-related specs keep the iMac in solid position.

    You might be alarmed by the fact that the design is the most interesting thing about the new iMac. A thin bezel is nice to look at, but it doesn't improve processing speed, workflow, or overall utility. Fortunately for Apple, it evolved that design from a computer with a strong technical foundation. It is the updates to that foundation, and a few points of polish along the way, that keep this iMac on elite footing.




    CNET's review machine, a souped-up $2599 model with 3.4 GHz Core i7 processor, 1 TB Fusion Drive, and NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680MX graphics, performed quite well in benchmark tests and features Apple's new display lamination process that greatly reduces reflectivity. The new iMac compares relatively favorably to Dell's XPS One 27 in many respects, with the Dell's touch capabilities and Blu-ray drive perhaps being significant factors in its favor for some users.

    The Verge has also reviewed both sizes of the new iMacs and was similarly impressed by the new display process being used by Apple.

    The IPS panels are the same as in last year’s iMacs, but they’re better integrated now — Apple says that by laminating the display to the glass it reduced reflections up to 70 percent, and indeed the glare problems that beset so many displays are much less present here, though there's still some reflection and glare. The improved manufacturing also makes whatever’s on the screen feel closer to you, almost like things are jumping out of the panel. The display's glossy bezel, which houses its HD FaceTime camera, is actually the most reflective part of the whole machine now.

    I have to say, I was really surprised to see how much better the screen could be without a single change to the actual technology — but hey, I guess plastic surgery can work wonders. Both screens have fantastic color reproduction, are remarkably (like, blindingly) bright, and have near-180-degree viewing angles.

    Overall, The Verge gives both iMac models scores of 9.0, noting that it is "still the best all-in-one device out there" but suggesting that the door is open for Windows 8 machines integrating advanced features like touchscreens and media center software to compete strongly with the iMac.

    11-20-12


    www.macrumors.com


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    Review roundup: the new iMac is more than just fresh design

    Faster and better overall, with some mild annoyances


    Reviews are starting to come in on both the new 21.5- and 27-inch iMac models, with the general consensus that both are lightning-fast (faster, in fact, than any comparable 27-inch Windows-based machine), offer much less reflectivity and a better display, and are gorgeous to look at. They also note some changes, such as the relocation of the memory ports (which are upgradable), and a reduction in quality of the built-in speakers (likely a sacrifice to the thin design). Though considered pricey, the new iMac is still thus far seen as being the best AIO computer around.

    Both CNet and The Verge have offered full reviews, with a handful of other sites adding first impressions, teardowns or unboxing pictures. As has been the consensus with previous models, the new iMac is praised as one of the best all-around computers available (though those wishing for more of a home-entertainment hub may be better off with the Mac mini or a Windows-based rival). Most mentions of the new version make a point of contrasting the removal of the optical drive (which makes the design radically thinner and continues to open the door to external Blu-Ray drives Apple never added) with Apple's clever implementation of a hybrid SSS/HD drive, known as the Fusion drive.

    The Fusion drive is more than just a 128GB SSD bolted onto a 1TB (or more) hard disk; it is intelligently self-managed by the OS so that the system and a user's most-frequently accessed apps and data are on the SSD portion, with storage of less-used files relegated to the hard drive. The clever part is that the system adjusts the management according to changing usage patterns, without the user's intervention -- a typically elegant Apple move, and one that makes the entire system feel dramatically faster than the previous model.

    CNet compared the 27-inch iMac to a closely-matched Dell XPS One 27-incher and found the new iMac outperformed it on every test, making it the fastest non-workstation 27-inch available. The Dell did offer HDMI input (allowing its use as a television) and two more USB 3.0 ports, and costs between $300-$400 less, but lacks the quality of the new lower-reflective display or the better video card. If the display is the main reason you want a 27-inch machine, then the choice is tipped in favor of Apple.

    As The Verge notes, the new version is also significantly lighter than the previous model, losing an astonishing eight pounds in the 21.5-inch version and 9.5 pounds for the 27-inch version. The review also notes that the speakers now have "zero" bass response, though mids and highs are good, but calls it a definite step backward from the previous versions' speakers. In terms of performance, the new iMac scores about 25 percent higher than the summer 2011 model using Geekbench, but actual speed improvements vary in different areas. Adding the optional Fusion drive makes a huge difference in overall feel and file access times.

    Both reviews take pains to mention that the iMac isn't 5mm thin at all points -- despite Apple clearly showing this both in its public debut and in pictures on its web site. The reviewers miss the point of the entire iMac line, right the way back to its beginning: hide the computer. The new iMac does the best job yet of this, making the machine appear impossibly thin from every angle a user is likely to ever look at it from in normal use. Most previous models of iMac also had a thicker middle than edge, particularly in the last few iterations.

    The obsession with the design means that some changes had to be made, including relocating the openable RAM panel to the back of the machine -- but overall Apple has significantly improved the iMac in every important way while losing 40 percent of its previous volume. Buyers will appreciate the speed, the much-improved (but still mobile-class) graphics, the screen quality and of course the advantages inherent in Mountain Lion. What they won't like is that the models cost $100 more than their predecessors, and continue to offer add-ons at more-expensive-than-retail prices.

    The iMacs' use of Thunderbolt technology is for now an under-appreciated advantage over competitors, and though the Fusion drive upgrade is frankly overpriced (at $250, and only available in some configurations of the iMac), those who opt to spend the money will see a big performance jump on top of an already fastest-in-class processor. Even the box has been redesigned for the new iMac -- emphasizing the design through a sloping top-to-bottom opening.

    The machine itself continues to be almost as quiet as the box it came in, with clearly better heat and fan management than anything available from Windows-based competitors. Combined with the less-glossy and well-calibrated display and the other technologies inherent in a Mac -- the integration of FaceTime and the camera, the noise-cancelling mic system, the ubiquity of Messages and iCloud integration -- the iMac is a somewhat pricey but clearly standout option for those who still want a desktop computer, particularly for productive and profitable use. [photos via CNet, Techcrunch]









    Profile compared to 2008 iMac





    RAM panel on 27-inch

    11-30-12


    www.electronista.com


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    iFixit iMac teardown reveals dual mics, difficult ram upgrades & glued on LCD



    While we had some pictures of a brief teardown earlier this week, iFixit has now completed its ritual teardown of the new 21.5″ iMac that officially went on sale on Friday.

    Unfortunately iFixit described the process as an “exercise in disappointment,” noting the iMac’s new thinner design introduces new hurdles for repairability. Most notably, the device’s glass and LCD are now glued directly to the iMac’s frame, while accessing the RAM, CPU, and hard drive will now mean having to remove the entire logic board:

    The late 2012 iMac 21.5″ — code-named EMC 2544 — is an exercise in disappointment for us. We were quite worried when we saw that super-thin bezel during Apple’s keynote, and unfortunately we were correct: the glass and LCD are now glued to the iMac’s frame with incredibly strong adhesive. Gone are the lovely magnets that held the glass in place in iMacs of yesteryear.

    A few things noted in iFixit’s highlights: a new rubber housing that “dampens the vibrations from the spinning hard drive,” a new single fan layout, dual microphones, and a 5mm thinner LG made display. Those are some of the highlights of Apple’s new design, but iFixit is scoring the new iMac a 3 out of 10 (down from 7 last year) due to the many issues with repairability. Here are just a few:








    * Intel Core i5-3330S, clocked at 2.7 GHz
    * Nvidia GeForce GT 640M GPU
    * Intel E213B384 platform controller hub
    * Texas Instruments Stellaris LM4FS1AH5bb microcontroller
    * 2x Hynix H5GQ2H24AFR GDDR5 SGRAM
    * Broadcom BCM57765A1KMLG
    * Intel DSL3510L Thunderbolt controller
    * Analog Devices SSM3302 audio amplifier
    * Vimicro VC0359 webcam processor
    * Intersil ISL6364 multi-phase pulse width modulation (PWM) controller
    * Cirrus Logic 4206BCNZ audio controller
    * National Semiconductor VM22AC

    * To our dismay, we must break out our trusty heat gun and guitar picks to get past the adhesive holding down the glass and LCD.

    * We were fairly surprised to see that the new iMac’s LCD sports the same model number as last year — LM215WF3 from LG — even though the LCD is 5 mm thinner.

    * By switching from a traditional 3.5″ desktop hard drive to a 2.5″ laptop drive, Apple designers were able to free up lot of real estate inside the iMac. Apple turned to HGST — formerly Hitachi, now a Western Digital company — to manage the iMac’s spinning storage.

    * A rubbery housing is lightly adhered to the edges of the hard drive beneath the upper and lower hard plastic bezels. This design is far different from what we’ve seen before. Since the internal components are more tightly packed than before, small vibrations may carry through more components. The rubber housing dampens the vibrations from the spinning hard drive so they are not perpetuated throughout the device.

    * A new fan layout! Apple is changing things up quite a bit and has moved from multiple small fans to a single centralized fan. “1″ may be the loneliest number, but removing 2/3 of the fans goes a long way towards saving space. Judging by the orientation of the fan, we gather that it draws cool air from the bottom vents, then blows hot air out of the grating in the back of the iMac.

    * The webcams in iMacs of yesteryear have always been connected to the logic board with long snaking cables that were relatively fragile; that is no longer the case. A ribbon cable we can only describe as “beefy” keeps the FaceTime HD camera in touch with the logic board.

    * The newest iMac features not one, but two microphones. Dual microphone technology has been utilized in mobile devices for years to cut out background noise during phone calls. Now, the same idea is being applied here to improve sound quality during intimate FaceTime chats with your mother.

    * The speakers may look simple, but removing them is nerve-wracking. For seemingly no reason other than to push our buttons, Apple has added a notch to the bottom of the speaker assemblies that makes them harder-than-necessary to remove.

    * Good news: You can upgrade the iMac’s RAM. Bad news: You have to unglue your screen and remove the logic board in order to do so. This is just barely less-terrible than having soldered RAM that’s completely non-removable.

    * After a short hiatus, Broadcom is back to bring WLAN capabilities to the iMac. A Broadcom BCM4331 single-chip WLAN solution dominates the tiny AirPort card.

    * Off comes the honkin’ heat sink! And along with it — the CPU??? The new iMac uses a spring-loaded, FCLGA1155 socket to make all those little electrical signals go into, and out of, the CPU: http://bit.ly/QUCPG6

    * These logic board traces (red) and hole (orange) make us think Apple’s proprietary SSD should reside in this spot:http://bit.ly/VeAeEs Placing the SSD from the 13″ MacBook Pro Retina Display confirms this notion: http://bit.ly/YhEmJuWe purchased the “bargain-basement” version of the iMac. We’re assuming that the more-expensive version — one that has the built-to-order Fusion drive option — has this connector soldered onto the board, and a 128GB SSD is placed into said connector.

    12-1-12


    9to5mac.com


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    Apple’s entry level 21.5-inch iMac now shipping time now up to 7-10 days from 1-3 day



    Apple’s entry level configuration of the new 21.5-inch iMac is now shipping in 7-10 business days from Apple’s online store. That shipping time is up from the 1-3 business days that the product was quoted as shipping in yesterday. The 27-inch iMacs were initially said to ship in 2-3 weeks, but they have since been pushed back to 3-4 weeks for new orders.


    12-1-12


    9to5mac.com


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