Yosemite

This is a discussion on Yosemite within the Mac OS X forums, part of the Mac Software category; Originally Posted by JezzerP I'd love one, but no, I'll probably run with a Mac Mini once it gets a refresh. I was just looking ...

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Thread: Yosemite

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by JezzerP View Post
    I'd love one, but no, I'll probably run with a Mac Mini once it gets a refresh.
    I was just looking at the Mac Mini specs and so on, It does look fantastic.
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    OS X Yosemite System Requirements & Compatible Macs List



    OS X Yosemite will be one of the most exciting updates to Mac system software in many years, complete with an all new user interface, major iOS integration, and tons of new features. Of course all the excitement surrounding Yosemite is largely useless if your Mac won’t actually run OS X 10.10 when it launches in a public release this fall, so let’s quickly find out if your Mac can run OS X Yosemite.


    Step 1: Identify Your Mac Model

    First up, figure out what exact model of Mac you have, including the model year identifier. This is easy:

    Go to the Apple menu  and choose “About This Mac”
    Click on “More Info…”
    Find the model and model year release details in the upper corner of this screen





    Now that you have the model and model year, you can just compare it against the list of supported Macs.


    Step 2: Compare to OS X Yosemite Compatible Mac List

    The developer preview builds of OS X Yosemite suggest that any Mac capable of running OS X Mavericks (10.9) is also capable of running OS X Yosemite (10.10). Accordingly, here’s the list from ArsTechnica‘s entry on the matter, the presumption as of now is that these Macs that can run Yosemite Dev Preview 1 will continue to be compatible with the final version, though that may change as the final release nears. We’ll be sure to update if anything does.

    iMac (Mid-2007 or newer)
    MacBook (13-inch Aluminum, Late 2008), (13-inch, Early 2009 or newer)
    MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid-2009 or newer), (15-inch, Mid / Late 2007 or newer), (17-inch, Late 2007 or newer)
    MacBook Air (Late 2008 or newer)
    Mac Mini (Early 2009 or newer)
    Mac Pro (Early 2008 or newer)
    Xserve (Early 2009)





    You’ll notice the primary hardware requirement is a 64-bit CPU, which is generally an Intel Core 2 Duo or newer processor.

    Of course, the list of minimally required hardware is going to be different than what offers ideal performance with all the translucent effects functioning as they intend to without degrading overall system performance, but some of that we won’t know until OS X Yosemite is released in the fall to the public. Generally speaking, the newer the computer the better, and the more resources available the better the performance.





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    Apple unveils Swift, a new programming language for iOS, Mac



    With plans to slowly retire the long-used Objective-C, Apple has introduced a new programming language, called Swift, for designing apps and applications to run on Apple iOS devices and Apple Macintosh computers.

    Apple designed Swift to be as intuitive and easy to use as popular interpreted languages such as Python and JavaScript, while maintaining the speed and flexibility of compiled languages such as C++.

    “Swift is fast. It is modern. It is designed for safety and it enables a level of interactively and development you’ve never seen before on the platform,” said Apple CEO Tim Cook, who introduced the language to the surprise of the audience at the company’s Worldwide Developers Conference, being held this week in San Francisco.

    Cook explained that Swift was designed to eliminate entire categories of common programming errors. It includes modern constructs such as generics, closures, type inference, multiple return types, operator overloads and other time-saving capabilities that developers have wanted to see in their languages.

    Many Apple developers expressed cheer at the news of Swift. The WWDC audience applauded thunderously upon Cook’s introduction to the language. The enthusiasm is understandable given the shortcomings of the aging Objective-C, which was created in the 1980s and came to Apple by way of Steve Jobs’ NeXT workstation company, purchased by Apple in 1996.

    On Twitter, one programmer expressed satisfaction that Swift could treat emojis – electronic smileys formatted in unicode – as variables. Another posted a picture of a Objective-C programming book that had been tossed into a trash can.





    Although Apple has done a commendable job of maintaining the language, and its developer ecosystem, Objective-C still suffers from undue complexity in many ways, noted Al Hilwa, program director for software development research at IDC. Objective-C was based on C, a programming language which on its own is difficult to master. Secondly, the approach that Objective C takes to passing messages between an application or within an application is difficult to learn as well.

    Swift has all the power of Objective-C, but without the “baggage of C,” Cook told the audience. He compared some benchmarks that showed Swift code running faster than Python and just as quickly as Objective C.

    Swift may be easier to learn and work with, but it will still take developers time to switch from Objective-C, Hilwa speculated.

    Apple is working to make the transition easier, though. Swift code can be run on the same run-time as Objective-C, and uses the same memory management module. It also can use Objective-C’s Cocoa libraries. “Your Swift code can fit along side your Objective-C code and C code in the same application,” Cook said.

    Apple is updating its Xcode IDE (integrated development environment) to include a feature called Playground, which allows the developer to inspect the output of code as soon as it is typed in.

    Swift does not appear to be related to another language with that name, designed for writing scripts to run in parallel computing environments.





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    Not so Swift: Apple’s new programing language was 4 years in the making



    Apple’s new programming language Swift might be a hit with coders, but bringing it to developers wasn’t quite as speedy a process as its name implies.

    Chris Lattner, director of Apple’s Developer Tools department, has updated his personal website with information relating to Swift — including some details of its development. According to Lattner, work on the language began back in July 2010. Lattner implemented much of the basic language structure himself, with only a few other people at Apple knowing of its existence. It was only when several other individuals began contributing to the project in 2011 that it started to gain momentum, leading to it becoming a major focus for the Apple Developer Tools group in July 2013.

    As anyone who has used Swift or exampled its endearingly geeky documentation will know, the language draws heavily from the more complex Objective-C language for inspiration, along with “Rust, Haskell, Ruby, Python, C#, CLU, and far too many others to list.”

    Lattner notes that features like the interactive “Playgrounds” function were designed to “to make programming more interactive and approachable.” It was also heavily influenced by Bret Victor’s concepts, alongside the interactive LightTable programming environment which landed on Kickstarter in 2012.

    Lattner writes that, “I hope that by making programming more approachable and fun, we’ll appeal to the next generation of programmers and to help redefine how Computer Science is taught.”

    Those wanting to find out more about Swift can do so by checking out the free programming guide which Apple dropped immediately after announcing the language at Monday’s WWDC.






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    OS X Yosemite: Top 5 features (Video)



    Now that we’ve had some time to get used to OS X Yosemite, it’s time to explore some of its top features. This is a big step up from Mavericks when it comes to iOS integration and design. Yosemite isn’t quite the drastic change we saw from iOS 6 to iOS 7, but there are definitely visual differences. It’s no surprise that iOS 8 has plenty of exciting features available, but the same can be said about OS X Yosemite as well…

    More than ever before, iOS and OS X have become somewhat unified, but not to the point where they’ve completely merged. Because of this, you’re getting the best of both worlds on any Apple device. There’s only one way to describe Yosemite and iOS 8: Connected. That’s the experience you’re getting here. There’s now a huge benefit that comes along with being an OS X and iOS user.

    With all of that in mind, what makes Yosemite so special? Well, let’s take a look at the top five features that this powerful new operating system has to offer.

    Check out our top five features video below:





    Of course, there are more than five new features available in OS X Yosemite, but in my opinion these are the best ones. Here are the top five features mentioned in the video above:

    Text Message/SMS through the Messages app
    Make voice calls within OS X
    AirDrop between Macs and iOS devices
    Handoff (Continuity)
    Smart Spotlight Search





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    Nice :)
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    Nearly 80 percent of Macs will be able to run OS X Yosemite



    OS X Yosemite will run on about eight out of every ten Macs, a boon for customers who want to upgrade in spring, but also another proof point that “good enough” has contributed to the personal computer business’s stagnation.

    Keeping with tradition, Apple dumped support for iOS 8 on the iPhone 4, leaving the four-year-old flagship stuck on iOS 7.

    OS X 10.10, aka Yosemite – named after the California national park – will support the same Macs as 2012′s Mountain Lion and 2013′s Mavericks, according to accounts of the Yosemite preview’s system requirements.

    Computerworld confirmed the supported-Macs accounts with developers, who asked not to be named because they weren’t authorised to disclose information about the pre-release software.

    Yosemite’s list was identical to Mavericks’ of last year, which had been nearly the same as Mountain Lion’s the year before.

    OS X 10.10 will run on iMacs from the mid-2007 model on; on 13in MacBooks from late 2008 (aluminium case) and early 2009 (plastic case) forward; MacBook Pro notebooks from mid-2009 and later (13in) and late-2007 and after (15in, discontinued 17in) and on; MacBook Air ultra-light laptops from late 2008 and later; Mac Mini desktops from early 2009 and after; and the much beefier Mac Pro desktops from early 2008 and forward.

    Mac owners can determine the age of their machine by selecting “About This Mac” from the Apple menu at the far left of the menu bar, then choosing “More Info…” from the ensuing window. The Mac’s age will appear under the name of the model, as something like “Retina, 13in, Late 2012″ for a MacBook Pro laptop.

    Until 2012′s Mountain Lion, Apple regularly trimmed its supported hardware list, dumping what it considered old as it added features to the operating system that either would not run on the aging machines, or would run poorly.

    But like Microsoft – whose Windows 8 and 8.1 runs on the same hardware as the five-year-old Windows 7, which in turn runs on the same hardware as 2007′s Windows Vista – Apple has lately acknowledged that older Macs are good enough for its upgrades.

    According to Internet metrics company Net Applications, 69 percent of all Macs that went online in May ran Mountain Lion or Mavericks, and will definitely handle Yosemite. A portion of the systems still on 2011′s Lion will also be able to run OS X 10.10.

    If Mountain Lion and Mavericks sustain their 90-day average losses and gains through September, the month before Yosemite is expected to launch, the two editions will be on 78 percent of all Macs as Yosemite reaches its release date.

    Industry analysts have cited “good enough” as one reason why personal computer sales have shrunk in the last two years. Where once users believed each new generation of hardware –particular the microprocessor – provided a discernible benefit, and that OS upgrades were worthwhile because they took advantage of those more powerful machines, now they see little reason to upgrade hardware because the tasks they conduct are capably handled even by aged systems.

    Windows PC sales in particular have been affected by the phenomenon, as buyers have rationalized that their Windows 7 systems, in some cases even those still running 2001′s Windows XP, do everything that they ask of them, and so see little reason for plunking down money for a new Windows 8 machine, that OS’s emphasis on touch notwithstanding.

    While Mac sales growth has usually outpaced that of PCs overall, “good enough” has not been without its impact there, either: Where Mac sales gains were once in double digits, more recently they have either contracted or increased by small amounts.

    Operating system makers like Microsoft and Apple have conceded the point, if only implicitly, by releasing upgrades that run just fine, thank you, on older hardware.

    But while OS X system requirements will stay stable, those for the iOS 8 continued Apple’s habit of dropping the oldest still-supported devices from the next edition’s list.

    Apple said iOS 8 will run on the iPhone 4S, 5, 5C and 5S; the iPad 2, iPad with Retina, iPad Air, iPad Mini with and without Retina; and the fifth-generation iPod Touch. Only 2010′s iPhone 4, which has continued to sell well in the last year, especially in developing markets like China and India, has been dropped from 2013′s list.

    The iPhone 4 is powered by the Apple-designed A4 SoC (system on a chip); all newer iPhones, iPads and iPod Touches rely on the A5 or later SoCs.

    Previews of OS X Yosemite and iOS 8 were made available to developers on Tuesday, with final versions slated to ship in spring, Apple said. The public will be able to obtain previews of Yosemite this winter through Apple’s new beta test program.

    OS X Yosemite and iOS 8 will be provided free of charge to eligible Macs, iPhones, iPads and iPod Touches.





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  9. #28
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    Apologies if this has been mentioned somewhere but when i was talking to the Senior Advisor at Apple the other day he mentioned that Yosemite will be a free upgrade just as Mavericks was last year, Good news eh!
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  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisonivy View Post
    Apologies if this has been mentioned somewhere but when i was talking to the Senior Advisor at Apple the other day he mentioned that Yosemite will be a free upgrade just as Mavericks was last year, Good news eh!
    So, I'm assuming that the core OS X system hasn't always been free?
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  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by ardchoille View Post
    So, I'm assuming that the core OS X system hasn't always been free?
    No not always, In 2011 I paid for Mountain Lion, I just missed getting it free by 5 days, I didn't mind though.
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