Yosemite Beta

This is a discussion on Yosemite Beta within the Mac OS X forums, part of the Mac Software category; OS X Yosemite Public Beta Limited to First Million Registered Users Earlier today as Apple was unveiling OS X Yosemite for the first time at ...

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Thread: Yosemite Beta

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    Yosemite Beta

    OS X Yosemite Public Beta Limited to First Million Registered Users







    Earlier today as Apple was unveiling OS X Yosemite for the first time at the Worldwide Developers Conference, software chief Craig Federighi announced that there would be a public open beta for the new operating system ahead of its launch this fall. Now, users on our forums have discovered an AppleSeed sign up page for the program, with Apple noting that the program is open to the first one million users who register.


    How can I participate?

    To join the OS X Beta Program, just sign up using your Apple ID. When the beta software is ready, you’ll receive a redemption code that will allow you to download and install OS X Yosemite Beta from the Mac App Store. Then go ahead and start using it. When you come across an issue that needs addressing, report it directly to Apple with the built-in Feedback Assistant application.

    Users will also need to be running OS X Mavericks, and Apple recommends that the OS X Yosemite beta be installed on a secondary Mac in the event of possible bugs and errors.

    OS X Yosemite includes a brand new user interface design alongside major new features focusing on seamless integration between Mac and iOS devices. The new operating system also includes a new cloud storage solution called iCloud Drive, as well as the ability to make phone calls and texts through an iPhone.





    6-2-14

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    Apple's OS X 10.10 Yosemite beta hints at Retina display iMacs



    Rumors of Retina iMacs have been floating since the iPhone 4 with Retina display launched in 2010, but newly discovered code in Apple's latest OS X 10.10 Yosemite beta suggests the anticipated all-in-ones may be close to hitting store shelves.

    Rooting around in the recently released Yosemite developer preview's system library, a member of French forum MacBidouille uncovered a string of code pointing to what could be a high-resolution iMac.

    A file covering display device settings shows a number of scaling options for an as-yet-unknown computer, with 6,400-by-3,600 pixels or 3,200-by-1,800 Retina display. Product identifiers associated with the file were previously referenced in a recent beta build of OS X 10.9.4 and tied to an as-yet-unannounced iMac model.

    The first of these resolutions indicates hexa "00001900 00000e10" is therefore a resolution scaling of ... 6400 x 3600 (probably 3200x1800 HiDPI).

    Continues and is 5760x3240 (2880x1620 HiDPI) 4096x2304 (2048x1152 HiDPI), etc..

    (There are other resolutions, just make the conversion from hex)

    While the scaling options can be deduced from the code string, the forum user notes a native display resolution is more difficult to pin down. It can be speculated that Apple will treat a Retina iMac much the same as it does the MacBook Pro with Retina display, meaning system graphics are generated at high resolutions then scaled down to sharpen the image.





    6-4-14

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    How to enable Yosemite’s hidden dark mode

    Step away from the light with Yosemite’s dark mode



    OS X Yosemite is the biggest visual overhaul Apple’s made to the Mac in years, but developers at WWDC seemed most excited about one tiny UI tweak – dark mode.

    Beta testers eager to try out the the new OS X 10.10 feature were disappointed to find out it didn’t make it into the first Yosemite beta, but our friend Jean-David Gadina, a developer at DigiDNA, has done some digging into the OS X Yosemite beta and discovered a new file not present in Mavericks that can be manipulated to enable the hidden dark mode feature.

    Here’s how to do it:





    Open your /System/Library folder by clicking Go >> Computer on the Apple menu bar, click your Yosemite drive then go to System >> Library
    Open the CoreServices folder
    Right click SystemAppearance.bundle and choose Show Package Contents
    Open Content >> Resources
    Rename “DarkAppearance.car” to “GraphiteAppearance.car”
    Open System Preference >> General
    Under Appearance switch from Blue to Graphite
    Logout and log back in

    Jean-David notes that the dark theme is clearly not finished – hence its omission from the first Yosemite beta. A lot of stuff is missing in the dark interface so only a few controls get the new dark look, while windows and menus keep the default light grey background.

    However, the DarkAppearance.car file is very interesting because it uses the same system as the one used in iOS 7 & 8, which should allow people to build their own “.car” theme files in the future.

    For those wondering about the .CAR files, they contain definitions for the appearance of all UI elements of OS X. According to Jean-David’s research, it looks like they are built by the “distiller” utility Apple added in Mavericks, that can be found in a private framework called “CoreThemeDefinition.”

    Once you’ve had your fill of partial darkness, revert back to the Blue appearance and fix the .car file names to their original state.





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    How to Install OS X Yosemite Beta on a New Partition & Safely Dual Boot



    OS X Yosemite is an amazing update to the Mac operating system that’s really better experienced than seen, but due to it’s current early beta status, it’s generally not a good idea to upgrade your primary OS X volume to the 10.10 beta quite yet. Instead, the safest approach is to install OS X Yosemite onto a separate partition of the hard drive, keeping it separate from your primary stable and productive existing OS X experience.

    This allows you to check out OS X Yosemite and dual boot between the OS X 10.10 beta and OS X 10.9 (or 10.8) without each operating system impacting one another, and you can safely switch between the two with a simple reboot process. This also allows you to uninstall Yosemite at any point easily if you want to.


    This guide is intended for those with access to the OS X Yosemite beta, typically through a developer account.


    Prerequisites Before Beginning

    Download OS X Yosemite – At the moment, you will need a Mac developer account to do this, anyone can apply for a dev account and pay the fee if desired, this allows you to download the OS X Yosemite Dev Preview installer through the Mac App Store
    Check system requirements to be sure that the Mac can run OS X Yosemite, generally if the Mac will run Mavericks, it will run Yosemite
    At least 25GB of disk space available to create a separate partition and install Yosemite onto
    Back up your Mac – you’re going to be modifying the partition table of the hard disk and installing beta software. Always back up everything before doing either, the simplest way to do this for most Mac users is simply to use Time Machine and initiate a backup manually.
    Once downloaded and having the Mac backed up, do not proceed with the Yosemite installation quite yet, you need to create the partition first if you want to keep the two operating systems separate and dual boot.


    Create an OS X Yosemite Partition

    The first thing you’ll do is partition the hard drive of the Mac to create a new partition for OS X 10.10 Yosemite to install on. This insures that your primary Mac OS X installation remains separate and preserved while testing Yosemite:

    Open the Disk Utility app, found in /Applications/Utilities/ and choose your hard drive from the left menu
    Choose the “Partition” tab, then click on the [+] plus button to create new partition
    Label the new partition something obvious, like “OS X Yosemite”, and then assign the partition a reasonable amount of space, a minimum of 15GB should be required but allocating more space is better if you plan to use Yosemite often (25GB+)
    Choose “Apply” to modify the partition table to create the new partition





    Exit out of Disk Utility when finished, you’re good to start the installation now onto that fresh partition.


    Install OS X Yosemite to the New Partition

    With the whole system backup complete, Yosemite downloaded, and the partition made, you can now safely install OS X 10.10 onto the separate partition, this will allow you to preserve your existing OS X installation without mucking it up with beta software.

    Return to the OS X Yosemite installer and launch it (look in the /Applications/ folder for “Install OS X 10.10 Developer Preview”
    Select “OS X Yosemite” (or whatever you named the partition) as the installation destination
    Let the installation complete, the Mac will automatically boot into OS X Yosemite when complete





    Enjoy OS X Yosemite! Remember, it’s in beta right now, so some things are fairly buggy and not every feature is fully implemented quite yet. Things will continue to evolve with each new release and update though, and you’ll be able to install those updates through the Mac App Store when they become available.





    Dual Booting: Switching Between OS X 10.10 and OS X 10.9

    Now that the installation is complete, you can dual boot between OS X Yosemite and OS X Mavericks (or whatever OS X you’re running). The easiest way to do this is by holding down the OPTION key during boot and selecting the partition volume according to the version of OS X you want to boot. Assuming you labeled OS X Yosemite partition descriptively enough, it’ll be easy to pick out.





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    At-a-glance comparison of graphic design elements of Yosemite and Mavericks



    Pixelapse has put together a great blog entry comparing some of the the graphic design elements of Yosemite with those of Mavericks, picking up on some of the subtle touches that many may not yet have noticed – like the translucent notification badges on the dock …

    Annotations point out the changes, like the smaller Apple logo in the menu bar and thinner icons.





    The author also points to some of the things Apple is still tweaking, like the three different versions of forward/back buttons in use.





    The page is well worth a visit if you haven’t yet tried the beta of Yosemite and want to get a sense of the look – and even if you’re testing it at present, you’ll almost certainly see things you hadn’t yet noticed.





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    Apple considered ditching iconic Apple Menu for Control Center in OS X Yosemite



    In addition to the comprehensive redesign, OS X Yosemite could have made a significant change to how the Mac operating system functioned since it originally shipped just over thirty years ago. The above image from a source shows a March build of OS X Yosemite that featured a Control Center panel. The panel did not end up shipping in the first beta of Yosemite and was not announced on the WWDC stage last week, but Apple definitely considered including it.

    In fact, developers have located numerous code strings in the first Yosemite build that confirms Apple’s testing of an OS X variant of Control Center:





    The Control Center feature was first introduced as a slide up settings menu in iOS 7. While, in iOS, Control Center is simple a handy feature for accessing commonly used toggles quickly, OS X’s variant would have represented a massive shift in the Mac’s fundamentals. According to sources and developers who have located OS X Control Center references in the current beta, the feature was designed to replace the iconic Apple Menu in the Menu Bar. The Apple Menu is currently home to buttons to access About this Mac, System Preferences, logging out, rebooting, and shutting down the Mac.

    Instead, OS X Yosemite could have placed all of those options in a slide out Control Center panel. Symmetrical to the new OS X Notification Center, Control Center would have slid out via a gesture on the trackpad or by the click of the Apple logo in the still-existing Menu Bar. Alongside features like Continuity and Handoff, Control Center in Yosemite would have brought increased feature parity with iOS and made it simpler for Apple customers to transition between devices. Control Center on the Mac would even have toggles for Airplane Mode, Bluetooth, AirPlay, and Do Not Disturb, like on iOS.





    Speaking of Do Not Disturb, it seems that the preferences for that feature indicates that Apple removed Control Center from Yosemite fairly late in development. A switch for activating or deactivating Do Not Disturb does not exist in the current build of OS X Yosemite, so perhaps Apple was relying on Control Center (as shown in the top image) for that function. To activate Do Not Disturb on the current Yosemite build, users have to use the unintuitive “Option + Click Notification Center icon” command. It is uncertain if Apple plans to re-implement Control Center on the Mac, but as iOS and OS X continue to adopt similarities, it is likely that Mac users will see the functionality at some point in the near future.





    6-11-14

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    Apple Releases OS X Yosemite Developer Preview 2



    Alongside iOS 8 beta 2, Apple today released a new version of OS X Yosemite, just over two weeks after initially introducing the operating system at its annual Worldwide Developers Conference.

    The update, Developer Preview 2, has a build number of 14A261i, and can be downloaded from the Mac App Store or the Mac Dev Center.

    OS X Yosemite brings a flatter, more modern look to OS X, with an emphasis on translucency, along with a slew of new features, including improved integration with iOS 8 through Continuity. It also includes a new "Today" view in Notification Center that offers integration with third-party apps, a retooled Spotlight search that offers new data sources, and several new features for apps like Mail, Safari, and Messages.

    OS X Yosemite is currently only available to developers, but Apple plans to offer a beta version of the software to Mac users at some point during the summer. A public release of OS X Yosemite is expected in the fall, after several additional beta iterations.


    New Features:

    - Photo Booth, which was missing from the first Yosemite beta, has now returned.



    - Time Machine: Time Machine has a redesigned interface that removes the stars.

    Screen Sharing: Screen Sharing has been updated to version 6, allowing users to block incoming screen share requests.




    - Settings: There's a new Settings icon.






    6-17-14

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    OS X Yosemite's 'Dark Mode' Now Available via Terminal Command

    OS X Yosemite's dark mode, which was demoed on stage at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference, has yet to make it into the beta as an available setting. It is, however, possible to get a glimpse of dark mode with a Terminal command.

    To enable the somewhat functional dark mode:


    sudo defaults write /Library/Preferences/.GlobalPreferences AppleInterfaceTheme Dark


    The command enables an early version of dark mode, which is clearly not yet complete, likely explaining why it is not yet officially available in the beta. Users should, of course, use caution when deciding whether or not to try this feature for themselves. Dark mode can be undone with a second Terminal command.




    The second beta of OS X Yosemite was released to developers earlier today, bringing several new changes like the return of Photo Booth and a new look for Time Machine. The public release of the software will likely come in the fall, after several more beta iterations.





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    Bluetooth LE Adapters Don't Enable OS X Yosemite's 'Handoff' on Older Macs



    Over the past few days, we've been exploring some of the system requirements for Apple's Continuity features such as Handoff, noting that an apparent requirement of Bluetooth LE support for Handoff would leave out a number of older Macs that are otherwise compatible with OS X Yosemite.

    In discussing the limitations for Handoff support, some MacRumors forum members suggested that adding an inexpensive third-party Bluetooth LE adapter to an older Mac might be enough to add support for the feature. Unfortunately, several forum members have discovered that this does not appear to be the case.

    One forum member has shared details of their testing, noting that in tests with a 2010 MacBook Air that does not include built-in support for Bluetooth LE, adding IOGEAR's Bluetooth 4.0 USB Micro Adapter works out of the box to add Bluetooth LE support to the machine, but does not enable support for Continuity features such as Handoff or AirDrop.




    While OS X Yosemite remains in beta testing and things could change before final release, it appears that Bluetooth LE support alone is not sufficient to enable Handoff and that Apple is instead enforcing a stricter requirement for built-in Bluetooth LE support, perhaps by defining specific models that are able to use the feature.

    Beyond Handoff, Apple is also adding a number of other features under the Continuity umbrella, not all of which require Bluetooth LE support. For example, the new phone relay feature that will allow users to make and receive iPhone calls right from their Macs relies on Wi-Fi rather than Bluetooth, meaning that more devices should be compatible with this feature and it is likely to work over longer distances.

    OS X Yosemite and iOS 8 are scheduled to launch to the public in the fall of this year, likely around the September-October timeframe.





    6-18-14

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    Apple Releases OS X Yosemite Developer Preview 3



    Alongside iOS 8 beta 3, Apple today released a new version of OS X Yosemite, three weeks after releasing the second Developer Preview and over a month after introducing the new operating system at its annual Worldwide Developers Conference.

    The update, build 14A283o, can be downloaded from the Mac App Store or the Mac Dev Center.

    OS X Yosemite brings a flatter, more modern look to OS X, with an emphasis on translucency and redesigned dock, windows, and more. It also includes a multitude of new features, such as improved integration with iOS 8 through Continuity, a new "Today" view in Notification Center that offers integration with third-party apps, a retooled Spotlight search with new data sources, and several new features for apps like Mail, Safari, and Messages.

    Ahead of today's new beta release, Apple announced plans to wipe all CloudKit data for the iOS and Yosemite betas, including data from iCloud Drive, iCloud Photo Library, and Mail Drop.

    OS X Yosemite is currently only available to developers, but Apple plans to offer a beta version of the software to Mac users at some point during the summer. A public release of OS X Yosemite is expected in the fall, after several additional beta iterations.


    New Features:

    Dark Mode - First previewed during WWDC, Dark Mode is now officially available as of the third developer preview of Yosemite. Previously, Dark Mode could only be enabled via terminal command.





    Interface tweaks - System Preferences, Mail, and iCloud Preferences have all seen some interface tweaks in DP3 as noted by 9to5Mac. There are also larger App Icons for Notifications and a new font in the Notification Center/Safari Favorites Bar.





    QuickTime - QuickTime has an updated icon.

    Settings - Apple appears to have removed the Continuity/AirDrop settings from the System Report in Developer Preview 3. Previously, these settings let users know if Continuity and AirDrop were accessible on their machines. Apple also removed an "Allow Handoff between this Mac and Your iCloud devices" toggle from System Preferences on some machines.





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