OS X El Capitan

This is a discussion on OS X El Capitan within the Mac OS X forums, part of the Mac Software category; Originally Posted by JezzerP I will probably just set it to download over night so it will be ready for me in the morning. My ...

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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by JezzerP View Post
    I will probably just set it to download over night so it will be ready for me in the morning. My Mac Mini is just going to be upgraded, but my MacBook Pro is getting a new SSD and more RAM so I will perform a fresh install on the laptop.
    Your Macbook Pro will be super turbo charged after that :)

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisonivy View Post
    Your Macbook Pro will be super turbo charged after that :)
    It certainly will!! A 500Gb SSD and 16Gb RAM.....should fly!!
    'Deep Thought' - Mac Mini Late 2018- macOS Mojave (10.14.5)
    'Marvin' - Mac Mini Late 2014 - macOS Mojave (10.14.5)
    'Orac' - MacBook Pro 13" Mid 2012 - macOS Mojave (10.14.5)

    iPhone 6S - iOS 12.3.1
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  4. #33
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    OS X El Capitan still exposed to vulnerabilities in Gatekeeper & Keychain, researcher




    OS X El Capitan, launched earlier on Wednesday, still contains serious vulnerabilities in its Gatekeeper and Keychain features, according to security researchers.

    When scanning app bundles, Gatekeeper does a single check and fails to continue scanning after the bundle is actually opened, Synack researcher Patrick Wardle said to Forbes. In a proof-of-concept experiment Wardle bundled unsigned malware alongside an Apple-signed terminal app, and Gatekeeper left the malware unchecked.

    Wardle refused to name the Apple-signed app, claiming that might put Mac owners at risk, but noted that it launched the second app in its own directory, and then stopped running. Though his technique opened up a terminal, he was able to render it invisible simply by renaming the correct app.

    Apple was reportedly informed about the Gatekeeper flaw earlier this year, and even had it demonstrated to a security team. Wardle suggested to Forbes that Apple could fix the hole by blocking hidden files, or at least offering users a warning about them. The company could be holding back because this approach might break some legitimate apps.

    The OS X Keychain vulnerability has been known by Apple since Oct. 2014, and involves "poisoning" the Keychain via an unauthorized app – in turn allowing a hacker to steal or delete sensitive data, Forbes noted. Researcher Luyi Xing, from Indiana University Bloomington, said that Apple informed his group a solution would involve a major overhaul of Keychain's infrastructure.

    In the meantime, an open-source app called XGuardian can be used to protect a Mac, Xing said.

    El Capitan is focused mainly on improving features like Spotlight and Safari, as well as boosting performance. Its first maintenance update, OS X 10.11.1, is already in beta, but whether it will tackle Gatekeeper or Keychain is unknown.





    9-30-15

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  5. #34
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    OS X El Capitan has a new icon you’ll hopefully never see




    When Scott Forstall was unceremoniously shown the door at Apple, Jony Ive’s design sensibilities began to seep more heavily into the look and feel of iOS and OS X. While much of Apple’s software during the Steve Jobs era was skeuomorphic in nature, Ive’s own taste tended to veer towards a flatter and more layered aesthetic.

    While iOS 7 was the first piece of Apple software to transition to a flatter UI, that same design aesthetic slowly but surely started showing up in OS X as well. Now, with OS X El Capitan having been released yesterday, you might soon notice that Apple implemented a noticeable change to one of the more longstanding and iconic features of OS X – the spinning beach ball of death, otherwise known as the SBOD.

    The SBOD typically rears its ugly head whenever OS X or a specific application is in the midst of heavy duty processing and starts freezing up.

    For years, the SBOD sort of looked like a 3D pinwheel. In OS X El Capitan, the SBOD has morphed into entirely flat design with brighter colors.






    It’s almost childlike in design, but at the very least it comes with a subtle shadow for a very slight 3D effect.

    Speaking to how well-known, and perhaps commonplace, the SBOD was back in the day, it was even spoofed during an episode of Family Guy many years back.








    10-2-15

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  6. #35
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    How to Clean Install OS X El Capitan on a Mac




    Some Mac users may like to perform what is known as a clean install with OS X El Capitan. Basically, a clean install involves erasing the Mac drive and starting fresh with a new installation of OS X 10.11, and users who opt for clean installs usually rely on their own personal backups to restore their personal file and data.

    While most Mac users are well served by running the normal update process to OS X El Capitan after it has been downloaded from the Mac App Store, this guide is for users who want to start fresh.

    You will need to have made a bootable OS X El Capitan installer drive with a USB flash key to perform a clean install. If you have already installed OS X 10.11 on the Mac, you can download it again and create a boot installer with these instructions.

    Remember, a clean install will erase everything, format the hard drive, and then install OS X El Capitan with nothing else on the Mac. If you are choosing to do this, you need to backup your data yourself, as erasing the volume and performing a clean install means nothing is coming with it. This is generally best for advanced users. If you don’t know what you’re doing with a clean install, and you have not made backups, don’t try this, you will lose data.


    How to Clean Install OS X El Capitan & Start Fresh

    Start and complete a backup with Time Machine before beginning. Alternatively, perform your own backups manually. Be sure to back up your important files, pictures, data, or whatever else — do not skip this. Performing a clean install will erase the Mac and you will lose any data you do not save to an external volume
    Connect the bootable USB El Capitan install drive to the Mac, then reboot the Mac
    After you hear the boot chime, immediately start holding the OPTION key during boot, continue to hold until you see a boot loader menu appear, at this screen choose “Install OS X El Capitan”







    At the “OS X Utilities” screen, select “Disk Utility”






    Select “Macintosh HD” (or whatever the name of the target Mac drive), then click on the “Erase” button





    Give the drive a name or keep it the same, and under “Format” choose “OS X Extended (Journaled)”, then click on “Erase” — THIS ERASES EVERYTHING ON THE MAC, THIS IS NOT REVERSIBLE







    When the drive is finished erasing, quit out of Disk Utility to return to the “OS X Utilities” screen
    Now choose “Install OS X” from the menu, click Continue





    Agree to the terms, and choose “Macintosh HD” (or matching whatever the name you formatted the drive to) from the list and click on “Install”







    That’s it, OS X El Capitan will perform a fresh installation on a now empty hard disk volume that you just formatted. Completing a fresh installation of OS X 10.11 can take a while, so be prepared for at least 30 minutes to several hours, depending on the speed of the drives in use.






    When finished, OS X El Capitan will boot into a brand new clean install, running through the initial OS X setup process on the Mac as if the Mac was brand new. No files, no data, nothing will be on the Mac except for what comes with OS X El Capitan, that is what a clean install is for.

    Now you’re ready to manually move your files and data back to the Mac, or start as new with nothing on the Mac, whatever works for you.





    10-2-15

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  7. #36
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    Loving El Capitan so far, Great being able to delete mail with swipe and I'm really loving the Split view feature.

  8. #37
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    El Capitan on the way.....
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails OS X El Capitan-image.jpeg  
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  9. #38
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    Done.....just setting up notes now.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails OS X El Capitan-image.jpeg  
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  10. #39
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    Good job Mac!!

    My 2012 MacBook Pro is flying now with 16Gb RAM and an SSD instead of the original hard drive. El Capitan is working nicely too.
    'Deep Thought' - Mac Mini Late 2018- macOS Mojave (10.14.5)
    'Marvin' - Mac Mini Late 2014 - macOS Mojave (10.14.5)
    'Orac' - MacBook Pro 13" Mid 2012 - macOS Mojave (10.14.5)

    iPhone 6S - iOS 12.3.1
    iPad Pro 12.9" - iOS 12.3.1

  11. #40
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    There are some posts on the net that some people are having problems with their WD Hard Drives after installing El Capitan.

    I have to say I haven't found that, Mine is just as it was with Yosemite.
    MacBook Pro Retina - macOS Sierra
    iPad Pro- iOS 10
    iPhone 7 Plus

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