Mountain Lion 101

This is a discussion on Mountain Lion 101 within the Mac OS X forums, part of the Mac Software category; You can show the precise last time a specific file was opened, an app was launched, or folder was accessed on a Mac, and the ...

Page 39 of 39 FirstFirst ... 29 37 38 39
Results 381 to 383 of 383
Like Tree6Likes

Thread: Mountain Lion 101

  1. #381
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    316 times

    Show the Last Time a File Was Opened & Accessed in Mac OS X



    You can show the precise last time a specific file was opened, an app was launched, or folder was accessed on a Mac, and the information is visible directly in the OS X Finder. There are actually two simple ways to see this file access information, and both are equally useful though as you’ll see they’re best used for slightly different purposes.

    Knowing the last file access time is useful for so many reasons, whether it’s determining the usage history of a file for your own purposes, or perhaps for more mildly forensic intentions, to help figure out more details about someone using a Mac and the specific access times of a file or app that was in use. Because it shows the date and time information, this goes beyond the Recent Items list trick which simply shows what files were opened.


    See the Last Opened Date & Time with All My Files

    If you want to see the last time a recent file was accessed, starting with the most recently used files, you can turn right to the All My Files view in Finder to quickly see this information. No settings adjustments are necessary here, this information is visible by default:

    Open any Finder window and from the “Favorites” sidebar choose “All My Files”
    Toggle to the “List” view option to find “Last Opened’ date and time





    All My Files is very convenient, but because it is sorted by recently used files, it’s not too helpful if you’re curious about the last date/time a specific file somewhere else in the file system was opened, the last time an application was used, the last time a system item was accessed, or for anything that was previously opened some time ago. If you’re wanting to find more specific access time information about other files and apps on the Mac, a simple View option adjustment will enable such a feature.


    Show Date & Time Last Opened of Anything on the Mac

    This works to view the precise last access date and time of anything accessible within the Finder of Mac OS X:

    From the OS X Finder, navigate to the folder containing the files (or apps) you want to see the last access date for
    Toggle into “List” view manually, or by hitting Command+2
    Pull down the “View” menu and go to “Show View Options”
    Check the box next to “Date Last Opened” to reveal the “Last Opened” column





    Find the specific file you want to see the precise last date opened for, and look under the “Last Opened” column to find the date and time down to the minute





    The “Date Last Opened” time is very accurate, but if you can’t see the time it was accessed you may need to expand the Last Opened column slightly to accommodate the full date and time, otherwise an appreciated access time will be shown instead.

    The “Last Opened” option can also be a very helpful sorting item for determining when certain files on your Mac could be safely moved off the primary drive and onto a secondary disk or backup drive, potentially helping to free up disk space or file clutter.





    10-21-13

    Source

  2. Ads

    Posts
    Many

  3. #382
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    316 times

    Easily add movies from one Mac to another Mac’s iTunes library



    “I’d like to convert my DVD movies to digital form and then play them from the Mac mini connected to my TV. The problem I have is that the Mac I use to rip DVDs is in my office and the mini (which lacks a DVD drive) is in the family room. Is there some way to easily move these movies from one place to the other over the network?”

    It’s a reasonably simple thing to do. First, configure your Mac mini so that you can share files with it. Do this by launching its copy of System Preferences, select the Sharing preference and enable File Sharing. On that same Mac launch iTunes and keep it running for the rest of that Mac’s natural life.

    On the Mac in your office, within the Finder choose Go > Connect to Server and in the window that appears click on Browse. Select your Mac mini and click the Connect As button. In the window that appears make sure that Registered User is selected and then enter the user name and password for the Mac mini. Also enable the Remember this password in my keychain option and click Connect.



    Configuring your connection.



    Now that you’re connected to the mini, select the user account that controls iTunes on that computer. Dig down and open Music > iTunes > iTunes Media. Within the iTunes Media folder you’ll spy an Automatically Add to iTunes folder. There is a folder action attached to it that will cause anything placed in that folder to be added to iTunes. Hold down the Command and Option keys on your office Mac and drag this folder to its desktop, thus turning it into an alias.

    Now, when you want to add a movie to the mini’s copy of iTunes, just drag it onto the Automatically Add to iTunes alias. The movie will be copied from your office Mac to the Mac mini and, thanks to the original folder’s folder action, be available for your viewing pleasure.





    10-22-13

    www.macworld.com

  4. #383
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    25,446
    Member #
    1529
    Liked
    316 times

    Apple Releases Safari 6.1, Brings Shared Links, Sidebar To Mountain Lion



    Safari 6.1 has just been released to bring Apple’s web browsing app for Mountain Lion into line with the newly announced OS X Mavericks version of Safari, with features like Shared Links, the new Sidebar, and Power Saver.

    This updated version of Safari is available now for all users of OS X Mountain Lion via the Software Update panel in the Mac App Store.

    The new version of Safari includes Shared Links, which lets you see and click through to the links your Twitter feed is sharing. The new Sidebar lets you see your own Bookmarks, Reading List, and the above Shared Links in one place, without interrupting your web browsing flow.

    There’s new one-click bookmarking, too. All you need to do is click the plus button to the left of the Smart Search field to add a web page to your reading list. To add the site to your Favorites bar or Bookmarks, simply hold the mouse button down when clicking.

    New Safari Power Saver will help you manage your battery life when browsing on a laptop, only loading the plug-in content you specify. Safari will also allow you to block data from getting to third-party websites, making sure only sites you allow will be able to leave you cookies or track your browsing history.

    All in all, a nice update that makes using Safari much more Mavericks-like on Mountain Lion, if for some reason you aren’t (or can’t) update to the newest version of OS X.





    10-22-13

    Source

Page 39 of 39 FirstFirst ... 29 37 38 39

Remove Ads

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Screensaver for Mountain Lion
    By Macette in forum Mac Applications
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 07-29-2012, 04:25 PM
  2. Mountain Lion on G5
    By ferg in forum Mac Pro
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-27-2012, 04:37 AM
  3. Mountain Lion
    By Poisonivy in forum Mac OS X
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 06-13-2012, 04:12 AM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-24-2012, 02:40 PM
  5. Mountain Lion
    By sparkyscott21 in forum Apple Forums Member News Depot
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-16-2012, 07:38 PM

Contact Us
Back to top