OSX Mavericks ( 10.9 )

This is a discussion on OSX Mavericks ( 10.9 ) within the Mac OS X forums, part of the Mac Software category; Digging through the System Preferences on the new OS X Mavericks, we’ve found a couple of Dictation features that are bound to make many users ...

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  1. #11
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    OS X Mavericks Allows for Offline Dictation and Live Feedback


    Digging through the System Preferences on the new OS X Mavericks, we’ve found a couple of Dictation features that are bound to make many users happy. With the check of a box and a 785 MB download, “Enhanced Dictation” makes it possible to speak your words without requiring an Internet connection. In addition, you can get live feedback. With live feedback, you can see what Dictation is interpreting before you press the enter key.

    It doesn’t seem that the feature works in this beta… yet. Since it’s already built into the OS, they may set up the downloads before the next beta hits.


    6-11-13

    9to5mac.com

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    iBooks on my Mac!! Finally!!

    Now, reading books on my iPad will always be a more pleasurable experience, but at least I won't have to carry two devices when I travel away on business...my MacBook Pro always has to come with me!

    The new enhancements coming in Mavericks look great. Admittedly, Apple are kind of playing catchup with 3rd Party Apps with some of the features, XtraFinder has had Tabs for a while, but it will be nice to have them as part of the native apps. The new Calendar app looks wonderful, as does Maps, and the way they link together and with your iPhone will be great....can't wait
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    OS X Mavericks Now Shows Which Apps Are Sucking Power



    OS X Mavericks has some crazy new power-saving technologies, as demoed yesterday at the WWDC Keynote. Most of these are system-based: the OS stops wasting CPU cycles running animations that are hidden behind another window, for example. But some, like this neat addition to the battery menu, are about advising the user what’s sucking the juice.

    Here you see the new menu item, which includes a section to tell you which apps are drawing “significant” power. This shows up whether you’re on battery or plugged in, and is a great way to keep an eye on power-hungry applications. If no apps are being too greedy, you’ll see this:




    This could clearly lead to paranoia, but on the other hand it’s a much quicker way of checking what’s causing your fans to spin up that the usual trip to the Utilities folder to launch Activity Monitor.

    And for what it’s worth, my MacBook Air seems to be running cool enough to stay on my lap.


    6-11-13

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    Apple's OS X Mavericks hints at future Retina Thunderbolt Displays and iMacs



    Amid Monday's excitement, it was discovered that the blue-and-green ocean wave wallpaper image Apple released to promote its upcoming OS X Mavericks for Mac is fitted precisely for a 27-inch Retina Thunderbolt Display, or even a 27-inch Retina iMac.

    The 5,120-by-2,880-pixel image hosted on Apple's website is sized at exactly twice the width and height of the 2,560 by 1,440 pixels found in today's 27-inch iMac and 27-inch Apple Thunderbolt display. The Retina-caliber wallpaper was first noted on Twitter by Web designer Marvin Scharle.

    Apple first hinted at Retina display support for its MacBook Pro lineup in 2011, when a developer preview of OS X Lion included a high-resolution wallpaper at 3,200 by 2,000 pixels. But Apple didn't release its first Retina display MacBook Pro until mid-2012, over a year later.

    It's possible that Apple could bring a Retina-caliber resolution to its standalone Thunderbolt Display later this year, alongside the debut of a new Mac Pro. When the company offered a sneak peek at its new cylindrical Mac Pro on Monday, it boasted that the high-end machine will be powerful enough to drive three 4K-resolution displays — but Apple does not currently offer any screens with a 4K resolution.


    The new Mac Pro will drive three 4K-resolution displays. Apple does not currently offer a screen of that caliber resolution.



    The 4K Ultra high definition television standard has a resolution of 3,840 by 2,160 pixels, giving it an aspect ratio of 16 to 9. The Digital Cinema Initiatives 4K resolution is slightly wider, at 4,096 by 2,160 pixels.

    Anticipation of a next-generation Thunderbolt Display has swirled since Apple redesigned its iMac lineup with a thinner profile in late 2012. The company's standalone big-screen displays have traditionally employed the same technology as its big-screen iMac, but such an update has not yet come to its Thunderbolt Display.

    Speculation about a 27-inch Retina display from Apple also comes as new rumors published this week by hit-or-miss publication DigiTimes claim that Apple is planning to release a new iMac in the second half of calendar 2013. Citing Taiwan-based industry supply chain sources, the report said that Apple is looking for alternatives to LG Display, as that company had low yields for iMac panels when the all-in-one desktop was redesigned in late 2012.

    That report made no mention of a possible Retina display for new iMacs, but those machines could also be a potential candidate for a high-resolution upgrade, based on the double-pixel wallpaper found in Apple's first OS X Mavericks beta.


    6-11-13

    appleinsider.com

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    All Macs capable of running OS X Mountain Lion likely compatible with OS X 10.9 Maver




    According to the release notes accompanying Monday's OS X 10.9 Mavericks Developer Preview, the OS is compatible with all Macs able to run the current version of Apple's desktop operating system, OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion.

    When Apple announced OS X 10.9 at Monday's WWDC keynote, the company failed to get into the specifics of the software, such as which Macs would be able to run the next-generation OS. If the Developer Preview is any indication, most Mac owners able to install Mountain Lion will also have machines capable of running Mavericks.

    People familiar with the Mavericks Developer Preview have informed AppleInsider that the OS supports the following Macs:

    iMac (Mid-2007 or later)
    MacBook (13-inch Aluminum, Late 2008), (13-inch, Early 2009 or later)
    MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid-2009 or later), (15-inch, Mid/Late 2007 or later), (17-inch, Late 2007 or later)
    MacBook Air (Late 2008 or later)
    Mac Mini (Early 2009 or later)
    Mac Pro (Early 2008 or later)
    Xserve (Early 2009)

    In addition, the system requirements call for 64-bit, Intel-based Macs currently running Mac OS X 10.6.7 Snow Leopard or higher, with 8GB of free disk space for installation.

    The computers and requirements listed above are nearly identical to OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion's requirements as stated by Apple in a support document. In fact, Mountain Lion stipulates that the base operating system on the install machine must be OS X 10.6.8 or later, a higher standard than Mavericks.

    Usually with a new operating system version, some Macs are left behind as their hardware simply can't keep up with the demands of advanced software. For example, all Macs powered by at least Intel Core 2 Duo processors were able to run OS X 10.7 Lion, but when Apple launched OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, some iMac, MacBook, MacBook Pro and Mac Pro configurations with Core 2 Duo CPUs were no longer supported. It seems that with OS X 10.9 Mavericks, however, all Mountain Lion-capable computers will be able to take advantage of the upgrade cycle.

    While promising, the nature of beta software precludes any guarantee that the final consumer version of Mavericks will carry the same system requirements as its Developer Preview, including what computers will be able to run the OS.


    6-11-13

    appleinsider.com

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    i'm really looking forward to Mavericks being released.
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    With all the bugs so far I don't like it till they fix them...
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    OS X Mavericks Tidbits: System Requirements, Redesigned Activity Monitor, App Battery

    At yesterday's Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple unveiled its next generation operating system, OS X Mavericks. While Mavericks incorporates a number of significant changes like a redesigned Finder, a Safari overhaul, and new Compressed Memory settings, there are also a number of other, smaller changes that MacRumors forum readers and other sources have unearthed.

    AppNap Settings - AppNap, which is designed to conserve battery by sending apps into a hibernation mode, can be disabled on a per app basis by developers.

    New Activity Monitor - The Activity Monitor has been redesigned, offering new charts and graphs that show bytes/packets sent/received. It also includes a new energy tab that shows the energy impact of apps and includes a built-in system diagnostics tool.




    Design Updates - Along with some app redesigns, Apple has removed much of the linen look that was introduced with Mountain Lion. Both Dashboard and the log-in screen have a new background. Launchpad folders also have a new translucent background, and Mavericks users will notice new fade in and fade out behaviors. Finally, Finder selections have new rounded corners and the dock has a new look.

    Notification Center - The standard gray linen background has been removed from Notification Center, in favor of a plain, dark background. Notification Center also includes a new Messages sharing option, allowing users to send messages without opening the app. It functions similarly to current Facebook and Twitter integration.

    Battery Status - The Battery dropdown menu has received a new category in Mavericks, displaying apps that are using a significant amount of power.




    Offline Dictation - Mavericks introduces a new “Enhanced Dictation” feature that allows users to use dictation without an internet connection. It also includes live feedback, which displays input before the enter key is pressed. The setting includes a 785MB download to enable the feature.

    Automatic App Updates - Automatic app updates are a new iOS 7 feature that has also been introduced to OS X with Mavericks. With this setting enabled, Mac App Store updates will be automatically installed in the background.

    LinkedIn Integration - OS X Mavericks includes native LinkedIn support.

    Do Not Disturb - While the Mac Notification Center already has a Do Not Disturb setting, Mavericks adds a new timer option that lets users schedule set times for the feature to be activated, similar to how the setting functions in iOS.

    Open GL 4 - Apple has updated OpenGL support in Mavericks and the OS will be available with the Open GL 4.1 Core Profile for Macs that support the feature.

    Text Shortcuts - Text shortcuts that were previously only available on iOS have been added with Mavericks. For example, "omw" is replaced with "On my way!" as in iOS.

    Skeuomorphism - While the Notes and Calendar apps have been redesigned with a new interface that removes some of the previous skeuomorphic design elements, Messages, Reminders, and Game Center have not been updated with a new design.


    The redesigned Notes app



    iCloud Folder - Finder has a new iCloud folder, which displays documents that are stored in the cloud.

    iBooks Store - On its website, Apple has begun referring to the iBookstore as the "iBooks Store", which may be indicative of an upcoming branding change.

    System Requirements - According to AppleInsider, Mavericks will run on most machines that are capable of running Mountain Lion, including some systems dating back to 2007. Notably, all MacBook Airs after late 2008 can run the software, as well as mid/late 2007 15-inch MacBook Pros, mid–2009 or later 13-inch Pros, and late 2007 or later 17-inch Pros.

    These are just a small fraction of the numerous changes that will likely be introduced with OS X Mavericks. Additional updates to the beta software will undoubtedly include even more new features, which are being noted in a thread on the MacRumors forums.

    Apple made OS X Mavericks available for developers yesterday. While there is no current expected public release date, the final version of OS X Mavericks is expected in the fall.


    6-12-13

    www.macrumors.com

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    I liked the look of AppNap in the presentation.
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    Five-year-old Macs not too old for OS X Mavericks




    The new OS X Mavericks will run on the same set of Mac desktops and notebooks able to handle the current OS X Mountain Lion, but iOS 7 dropped support for iPhone 3GS, the 2009 smartphone supported by the current iOS 6.

    OS X 10.9, aka Mavericks – Apple’s first non-cat nickname for a version of the operating system – will support the same Macs as 2012′s Mountain Lion, according to a developer with access to the Mavericks preview.

    Computerworld confirmed the developer’s account.

    The only difference between the Mountain Lion and Mavericks lists was a slightly more specific reference to eligible 13in MacBook Pro laptops in Mavericks’ list. While Mountain Lion supported all MacBook Pro models – 13in, 15in and the discontinued 17in – made from mid- to late-2007, Mavericks called out only mid-2009 and later 13in MacBook Pro notebooks.

    Apple has regularly trimmed its OS X supported hardware list, dumping what it considers old as it adds features that either won’t run on the ageing machines or, more likely, will run poorly. But like Microsoft – whose Windows 8 runs on the same hardware as the three-year-older Windows 7 – Apple has probably found that older Macs are simply ‘good enough’ for the upgrade.

    In some cases, crossing off older Macs has had major implications for customers, and thus Apple’s ability to keep pushing as many as possible to the newest OS X. The best example: Snow Leopard. That 2009 operating system has resisted retirement in large part because it was the last that let users run PowerPC applications.

    According to web analytics firm Net Applications, Snow Leopard powered 25 percent of all Macs that went online in May, the same percentage as ran 2011′s Lion, and its decline, while consistent, has been slow.

    By the end of the year, Snow Leopard will still account for one in five Macs.

    While OS X system requirements stayed stable, those for iOS showed Apple’s typical practice of dropping the oldest still-supported devices from the next version’s list.

    Apple said iOS 7 will run on the iPhone 4, 4S and 5; the iPad 2, the two 2012 models of the Retina-equipped iPad and the iPad Mini; and last year’s fifth-generation iPod Touch. Missing from that list were the iPhone 3GS and fourth-generation iPod Touch, both which can run the still-current iOS 6.

    Previews of OS X Mavericks and iOS 7 are now available to developers, with final versions slated to ship this spring, Apple said on Monday.


    6-14-13

    www.macworld.com

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