OSX Mavericks ( 10.9 )

This is a discussion on OSX Mavericks ( 10.9 ) within the Mac OS X forums, part of the Mac Software category; Safari 7.0 Top Sites Apple's new Safari 7.0 is faster, more efficient and sports streamlined new interface enhancements in OS X Mavericks. In keeping with ...

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  1. #21
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    Safari 7.0 streamlined and accelerated for OS X Mavericks

    Safari 7.0 Top Sites



    Apple's new Safari 7.0 is faster, more efficient and sports streamlined new interface enhancements in OS X Mavericks.

    In keeping with Apple's new direction for iOS 7 and OS X, the enhanced web browser strips Safari of some superfluous adornments. One example is Top Sites, which now presents simple thumbnails of previously visited as squares (above), rather than wide, curved images with a faux floor reflection.

    Users now have a preference of displaying up to two dozen images on the Top Sites page, and pinning or rearranging the squares no longer requires hitting an Edit button; simply mousing over an image displays its editing controls.


    Goodbye, Coverflow

    Another rarely useful visualization is also gone in Safari 7.0 (but not from OS X Mavericks' new Finder): a Coverflow display of cached websites in History or Bookmarks, including the Favorites Bar that appears above tabs (currently referred to as the "Bookmarks Bar").


    Safari 7.0 Bookmarks

    Instead, History simply shows a simple, hierarchical list of your browsing history. Bookmarks is also greatly simplified, now depicting three types of links; the first is your standard Bookmarks (with a preview rather than a duplicate set of listings and Coverflow imagery, above).


    Reading List magazine

    The second set is your cross-device, iCloud synced Reading List. To catch up on your saved articles (which you can add to the list via the Share button) simply click on on a page to view it either on the standard page, or via Reader in a simplified, no distraction environment.

    When you scroll to the bottom of a Reading List article, the next item in your list follows it, allowing you a magazine like experience even more similar to Instapaper.

    The third is a new feature: Shared Links. This combs through the URLs of social networks you've configured your Mac to follow (currently supporting Twitter and LinkedIn) to present a social bookmark list (below).


    Safari 7.0 Shared Links



    Like your own personal Reading List, you can quickly scan through the webpages shared by users you follow, optionally using Reader, with each article flowing into the next.

    At the top of each page is a banner that shows who shared it, what they commented about it, along with a button you can use to retweet it to your followers (above).


    Faster and more efficient

    Safari 7.0 also benefits from a year of WebKit development, including a new "Nitro Tiered JIT" (Nitro is Apple's JavaScript engine, and the tiered Just In Time compiler is a mechanism to efficiently decide how best to execute code when loading web pages, using one of its optimized alternative processes).

    When you perform a search in Safari 7.0 via the Smart Search bar, it immediately begins loading the suggested top hit in the background before you even chose it, resulting in a snappy, responsive feel. You can turn this preloading off, and even turn off the instant search engine suggestions as you type a search query.

    Safari also waits to load Internet plugins (ahem, "Adobe Flash animations") until you click, similar to the functionality of Click To Flash.

    This saves battery life so the browser isn't constantly loading and rendering lots of inefficient animations, ads and other content unless you opt to actually see this stuff. As a side note, this will be brutal to advertisers who haven't yet migrated from Flash to HTML5.

    Safari also benefits from other battery saving initiatives in OS X Mavericks designed to idle the processing of content that isn't visible (or playing desired content such as background music).




    As a result of these various optimizations, Safari is not just significantly faster than Chrome and Firefox in both general SunSpider and task-oriented JSBench tests, but also delivers a noticeable edge in CPU energy efficiency (and therefore battery life) and uses much less memory at the same time.

    Safari 7 also plugs into other enhancements of OS X Mavericks, including iCloud Keychains for secure storage of not just passwords, but also credit card information (iCloud Keychain sync uses multiple factor authentication), and also now supports web site push notifications, so you can be updated on events you select (such as online auctions, or web-based messaging systems).


    6-14-13

    appleinsider.com

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  3. #22
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    Why the Mac Finder took so long to get the new Tabs in OS X Mavericks



    More than half a decade after adding tabs to Safari 3.0 in 2007, Apple has incorporated the same feature into the OS X Mavericks Finder to organize multiple views into a single window, building on years of technology advancements to support the seemingly simple and obvious feature.

    "Finder Tabs help you declutter your desktop by consolidating multiple Finder windows into one," Apple states on its feature preview site. "You could keep a tab for Documents, one for AirDrop, and one for Back to My Mac, all in a single Finder window."

    Just like Safari's browser tabs, "you can switch between tabs, customize views, and reorder them however you like."


    A Full Screen Finder

    Users might wonder what took Apple so long to bring such an obvious feature from its web browser to its desktop experience. After all, Cocotech's Path Finder and BinaryAge TotalFinder introduced tabbed Finder alternatives years ago, and Apple certainly understands the value of tabs given its years of supporting them in Safari.

    Rather than being a simple feature addition, the new Tabs are designed to be particularly useful in the new Finder because they support drag and drop of documents between tabs, including a tab of the AirDrop window for wireless sharing.

    This also makes the new Finder fully-functional in Full Screen mode, where users can actually work with multiple window views. Currently, the Finder is among the few apps bundled in OS X that doesn't support Full Screen use.


    Multiple Displays

    Making the Full Screen Finder even more useful is Apple's parallel overhaul of Multiple Displays. For the first time on the Macintosh, there's no longer any notion of a "primary display" hosting the menu bar and Dock.




    In OS X Mavericks, every connected display presents a fully functional menu bar and a Dock (above), including any wireless AirPlay screens hosted by an Apple TV connected HDTV display (below).




    Each display can also now support its own Full Screen app, and a "supercharged" new version of Mission Control now allows users to drag and drop an entire Space (including a Full Screen app) to another display (below).




    While seemingly simple, the development of Multiple Displays and support for a Full Screen Finder required a lot of background changes to how OS X works.


    Standing on the shoulders of giant leaps forward

    The evolution of the revamped desktop and its Finder is visible in previous releases of the operating system, including 10.3's Exposť for managing windows and apps, 10.4's Dashboard as a parallel desktop environment of widgets, 10.5's Spaces implementation of virtual desktops and 10.6's rewritten Cocoa Finder.

    In OS 10.7 Lion, Apple introduced Full Screen apps and the new Mission Control feature to unify Exposť, Dashboard and Spaces along with a new Screen Sharing architecture supporting multiple concurrent users through support for virtual displays. Apple also enhanced the Finder with expanded new integrated Spotlight search and item arrangement views.

    In OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, Apple added support for drag and drop enhancements to Remote Desktop virtual displays, for Full Screen apps on any attached display and for AirPlay Mirroring to Apple TV.

    These features set the stage for OS X Mavericks' expansion of multiple desktops, virtual displays and wireless AirPlay, along with a Full Screen Finder that binds multiple views into a single tabbed window rather than just tacking on tabs as a standalone feature.


    6-14-13

    appleinsider.com

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    Video Shows Differences Between Mavericks and Mountain Lion Multiple Monitor Support



    During the WWDC Keynote presentation last week, Apple executive Craig Federighi showed off Mac OS X Mavericks. One of the new features is more substantial support for multiple monitors.

    In Mountain Lion, there are issues with using full-screen apps on setups with multiple monitors. Putting an app into full-screen mode disables the rest of the monitors. In Mavericks, apps can be set to full screen on individual monitors and moved around as necessary.

    However, as this video shows, there are some changes in Mavericks that multiple monitor users may not like. For instance, application windows cannot be used across multiple monitors anymore -- windows can only be used on one monitor at a time. Also, spaces are only switched individually, which could affect the workflow of some users.

    It appears that, in OS X Mavericks, users can switch between both the Mountain Lion multiple monitor setup and the new multiple monitor support in Mavericks as needed. As always, it's worth noting that this is a beta and things could change before the final version of OS X Mavericks is released in the Fall.


    6-17-13

    www.macrumors.com

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    OS X Mavericks' new App Nap, Timer Coalescing features target battery efficiency



    Apple plans to advance its leadership in notebook battery efficiency with a series of new features in OS X Mavericks designed to achieve substantial power savings while maintaining or even improving upon the "snappy" responsiveness of the system.

    In addition to the previously considered Compressed Memory feature of the upcoming OS X Mavericks, which aims primarily to make the most efficient use of available memory while enhancing battery life on the side, Apple has profiled two other advanced features of the new release that are aimed directly at extending battery life and two enhancements targeting web browsing and video playback.


    App Nap

    The first is App Nap, a new OS architecture feature that monitors each running application to determine what priority it should get in terms of processor, network and disk resources.

    For example, if an app is running invisibly the background, OS X Mavericks can transfer disk and processor priority to the foreground app, improving the apparent responsiveness of the system.

    The system analyses several factors to determine which apps should get full access to the CPU, storage and network resources and which should be throttled back.

    Among the heuristics Apple applies to calculate and assign priority are whether a background app's windows are even visible or whether it playing audio the user wants to hear. Developers can also opt out of App Nap while performing an important task.

    But Apple's overall design philosophy for App Nap keeps the feature active by default for apps in the new release, requiring fewer necessary changes for existing apps in order to benefit, while delivering the greatest energy savings possible. Developers can also make minor changes to take even fuller advantage of the new feature.

    App Nap gets particularly aggressive in throttling back less important tasks when the user is running on battery power. A series of actions seek to keep CPU cores, disks and network devices idle and in low power modes as much as possible.


    Timer Coalescing

    Integrated with App Nap is a parallel feature named Timer Coalescing that aims to coordinate the resource demands from different apps and background task so that once system resources are awakened to do necessary work, a variety of other pending tasks can be performed at the same time.

    This delivers real results in efficiency because without such coordination, the system's components must be constantly woken from idle to handle a flurry of randomly occurring tasks, preventing the system from ever getting enough sleep to take advantage of idle mode power savings.




    With Timer Coalescing, the system's various tasks are either deferred or shifted so that they can be executed at the same intervals, enabling processor cores to go fully idle for longer periods of time in between.




    "Grouping operations allows your CPU to spend more time in a low-power idle state, using energy more efficiently with no compromise in performance," Apple notes in its OS X advanced technologies preview of OS X Mavericks.

    Timer Coalescing's coordination of tasks is illustrated in before and after images portraying a 2 second snapshot of activity (below).









    "This can dramatically increase the amount of time that the processor spends idling," the company adds in its core technology overview. Apple notes that OS X Mavericks new efficiency features can reduce battery consumption by up to 23 percent, with little or no impact apparent to the user.


    Safari Power Saver

    Noted in our previous report on enhancements to Safari 7.0, Apple is now suspending web plugins until the user decides to view them.

    "Many websites display animations using power-hungry plug-ins that can drain precious battery life," Apple notes in a feature aimed directly at Adobe Flash animations and ads.

    "The new Safari Power Saver feature recognizes the difference between what you came to see and the stuff you probably didnít. If the content is front and center it plays as usual. But if itís off in the margins, Safari Power Saver pauses it. Youíll see a static preview, and it wonít run until you click to play it."




    This feature works similar to the existing "Click to Flash" plugin, displaying a placeholder users can click to load as they choose (above). Apple says that with the new feature, "browsing websites with plug-in content will use up to 35 percent less CPU power."

    Combined with other advances in Safari 7, Apple claims a performance advantage over both Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome, while using significantly less power than either alternative (below).




    Enhanced hardware acceleration for H.264 media playback

    Also new on the battery efficiency front in OS X Mavericks is enhanced support for offloading media playback to the GPU to take full advantage of hardware acceleration.

    In the new release, OS X's "video playback engine takes greater advantage of the efficient graphics hardware in your Mac and reduces the frequency of disk access," Apple states.

    The improvements apply to both audio and video playback. Apple says users can "go ahead and watch iTunes HD TV shows and movies full screen even when youíre unplugged" and states "your CPU will use up to 35 percent less energy while youíre watching video."

    Apple's focus on MPEG H.264 standards-based media playback and its optimizations for hardware acceleration on both OS X and iOS stand in stark contrast to efforts by Google and Mozilla to push ideological objectives that relied upon less sophisticated and efficient software codecs.

    Google's efforts to subvert H.264 playback on the web with its own WebM have not only failed to gain traction, but have done so at the expense of optimizing Android or ChromeOS to play real world media, leaving its users with devices that run hotter and deliver either inferior playback performance or require massive batteries.


    6-18-13

    appleinsider.com

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    Parallels Announces Desktop 8 Support For OS X 10.9 Mavericks



    Testing a beta version of OS X 10.9 can always be risky, but to mitigate the possibility of losing all your data thanks to a crazy bug, you can always try running Mavericks in a virtual environment.

    Parallels just announced that developers can install the OS X 10.9 Developer Preview in a virtual machine by using Parallels Desktop 8. To help users get started using Mavericks in Parallels, the Engineering team published the following guides:

    KB 116282: How to install OS X 10.9 Mavericks Developer Preview in a virtual machine
    KB 116259: Start Parallels Desktop for Mac on OS X Mavericks

    OS X Mavericks is only available to registered developers right now, so if youíre not an Apple developer you still wonít be able to check out the new features through Parallels and will have to wait until this Fall to try it out for yourself. However, you can check out our preview of Mavericks to see everything thatís new.


    6-19-13

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    Move Dashboard Around In Mission Control, Like Any Other Space



    Remember that the OS X Mavericks beta isnít a final versionóitís meant to be used by developers to ensure that their software will work with Appleís latest and greatest. With that disclaimer in mind, letís check out yet another little feature in the beta.

    Prior to OS X Mavericks beta, the Dashboard, loaded with useful widgets of all stripe, used to be limited to two states: disabled, or locked to the top left side of the Mission Control screen.

    Now, however, with the advent of OS X Mavericks beta, thatís no longer the case. The Dashboard is now treated the same as any other Space when enabled. Hereís how to get it enabled, and then how to move it around.

    First up, youíll need to activate Mission Control, either with the keyboard key defined in System Preferences, or with the Dock icon. If you see Dashboard to the left of all the other Spaces across the top, itís enabled. If not, head to System Preferences, click on the Mission Control preferences icon, and click on the Show Dashboard as a Space checkbox. Then you can activate Mission Control.

    To move Dashboard around, simply click and drag on the little rectangular Dashboard space at the top left, and drag it to the right, letting go of the mouse button when youíve moved it to where you want it to go. Now the Dashboard space can be anywhere in the rotation you like it. Sweet!

    To move it back, or disable Dashboard, simply do the same steps in reverse.


    6-21-13

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    This Is One Of The Most Convenient New Features Of OS X Mavericks



    The improved Notifications in OS X 10.9 are great. Not only can you respond to notifications as they appear on your desktop, but the new Notification Center also lets you know when your peripherals are about to die.

    Now when your keyboard or mouse is getting low on juice, OS X Mavericks will display a notification alerting you that itís almost time to change the batteries. The days of getting caught with a dead mouse during a presentation may finally be over.



    6-21-13

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    Get Social Networks In The Safari Shared Links Sidebar With Mavericks [OS X Tips]



    Safari has been updated in OS X Mavericks, of course, with a host of under-the-hood improvements, along with quite a few new features. One of them lets you see what your social connections are recommending to their various social network sites like Twitter, Facebook, and Linked In.

    If you want easy access to the links your friends, acquaintances, and business contacts are sharing on their social sites, all you need to do is add your social network credentials, and then open up Safari.

    Launch System Preferences from the Apple menu, Dock, or Applications Folder, and click on the Internet Accounts icon, which will open the preference pane. Once there, youíll need to add in your Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn account information. Click on the service or services you want to add on the right, and then enter in your login name and password. The added service will then show up in the column to the left.

    Now when you drop into Safari, click on the little Bookmarks icon in the upper left part of the Safari window, just under the Back button. YOuíll have a sidebar expand from the left, giving you the Bookmarks, Reading List, and Shared Links columns.

    Click on the Shared Links icon at the top of this new sidebar, and youíll see all the links that are getting shared from the services you logged into in the step above. Click on any of the shared links to go to that page, and right click on it to Open the link into a new window or tab. Site-sepcific options are also there, like the Show on Twitter.com and Retween options when right-clicking on a link shared from Twitter, for example.

    The sidebar will stay open, as well, letting you browse through all your shared links and Reading List pages on the fly, without having to invoke the sidebar again and again. Itís all rather handy, to be sure.


    6-24-13

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    OS X Mavericks Will Boost Graphics Performance On Even Older Macs



    The new Mac Pro is looking like it will be an absolute powerhouse, but even regulars Macs should see a major performance improvement running OS X 10.9 Mavericks, thanks to the new operating systemís incorporation of OpenGL 4.

    Over on his personal site, Rishi Kumar ran a comparison of OpenGL performance between OS X Mountain Lion 10.8.4 and OS X Maverickís Developer Preview 1. The comparison was done on a behemoth of a Hackintosh, featuring a Intel Core i7-3770k LGA 1155 processor over clocked to 4.4GHz and an overclocked Gigabyte GeForce GTX 660Ti w/ 2GB GDDR5.

    Not only is OS X Mavericks much more compatible with the OpenGL standard than Mountain Lion (Mountain Lion didnít even fully support OpenGL 3.3, while Mavericks supports up to OpenGL 4.1), but even running backwards compatibility comparisons in OpenGL 1.1 Ė 2.1, Mavericks showed performance gains from anywhere between 39 and 89%!

    As Kumar admits, such a comparison is crude, but it still means that we should see quite a performance improvement in Mavericks for 3D graphics that render using OpenGL. Nice.


    6-24-13

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    Mystery of maps.apple.com revealed: it's for sharing between OS X Mavericks, iOS




    The purpose of Apple's maps.apple.com domain is explained in OS X Mavericks as being a way to share maps with other users, whether they have access to Apple Maps or not, rather than pointing to a standalone web service.

    Last fall, AppleInsider reader Feynman noted that Apple had registered maps.apple.com as a URL that, in iOS 6, opened by default in Apple's new Maps app rather than Safari.

    The URL domain was later noted to be in use in the new iOS 6 Maps app to share a location via email, iMessage Twitter or Facebook. Opened by an iOS 6 device, the URL resolves to open Maps, but when users on other platforms attempt to open a maps.apple.com URL, it is resolved by Apple to URL coordinates that point to Google Maps, allowing other users to see the map in their browser.

    In OS X Mavericks, Apple has added its own native Mac Maps client, which uses the same sharing options as iOS 6 Maps while also adding new support for AirDrop.





    When you share a location to email, for example, Maps creates a new message (depicted above) with an maps.apple.com URL, a standard .vcf that can be opened by Contacts (below) or any other standards-based contacts app, and an image of the location being viewed.





    With a native Mac app, it makes even more sense for Apple to use its own URL domain. Just as with iOS 6, OS X Mavericks opens a shared location in the form of a maps.apple.com URL in Maps, but when users outside the Apple ecosystem try to look up the URL, Apple redirects them to coordinates in Google Maps that work in any web browser.


    Why Apple isn't in the browser maps business

    Earlier speculation suggested that Apple might seek to open its own HTML-based Maps website, making its custom maps, search and directions available to any browser-connected user, just as both Google and Nokia do, among others.

    However, in order to reach the majority of web users, Apple would need to simplify its Maps offerings the way Google and Nokia do in their basic maps. For their more advanced 3D offerings, the two companies must either use a web plugin (as Nokia does) or only support specific browsers (as Google does for its advanced WebGL maps project, which only works in Chrome or Firefox).


    Google Maps 3D still a work in progress



    Instead, Apple had exclusively targeted only its own native iOS and OS X clients, with no web interface. That allows to to focus entirely upon providing a native experience, rather than adapting its maps to work on the web. Reaching the masses has been delegated to Google Maps.




    Compared to a web based offering, Apple's native Mac app allows for much faster performance, supports familiar multitouch gestures like pinch to zoom, directly integrates with Contacts, syncs location Bookmarks with iCloud and can share locations and directions using standard Share Sheets via email, iMessage, nearby users with AirDrop or to Twitter and Facebook.

    In order to compete against Apple Maps on iOS and OS X, Google and Nokia are both using web-only tools for the Mac, and only Google offers a truly native iOS app. Nokia Now for iOS basically wraps a less sophisticated web view.

    Apple's strategy also simplifies its third party development APIs for Maps, as it can focus entirely on Cocoa developers without also building a web-based API as Google and Nokia have. This focus has allowed Apple to catch up with the larger map players, both of which had native clients for their own Android and Windows Mobile platforms before Apple.

    In just its first year, Apple has been able to rapidly deploy advanced, vector based maps and 3D satellite images on both its desktop and mobile platforms, and allow its iOS and OS X app developers to leverage its map service in their own apps.


    6-26-13

    appleinsider.com

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