OSX Mavericks ( 10.9 )

This is a discussion on OSX Mavericks ( 10.9 ) within the Mac OS X forums, part of the Mac Software category; The latest OSX .. Craig Ferenghi just announced some features OS X 10.9 Mavericks: • Finder Tabs. No more having a thousand Finder windows open. ...

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    OSX Mavericks ( 10.9 )

    The latest OSX ..



    Craig Ferenghi just announced some features OS X 10.9 Mavericks:

    • Finder Tabs. No more having a thousand Finder windows open. Now it’ll work like Safari with one tab for every Finder instance. You can
    • Tagging. You can now tag files to make it easier to find files you need. These tags exist almost as smart folders in Finder, and you can easily tag files by either entering the text you want to tag it with, or drag them into your tag folder. Looks like Apple has finally given up on hiding the file system on OS X.
    • Multiple Displays. Finally, proper multiple display support! Going full screen on one display won’t blank out your other display. And you can pan Spaces on each display individually. You can easily open apps on whatever display you want, have more than one app fullscreen at once (dragging assets between apps) or keep one display static with pinned apps (like a Dashboard) while you work dynamically on the other one.


    6-10-13

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    Apple WWDC: Have Paid Developers $10B; OS X ‘Maverick’




    I'm at the Moscone West convention center in San Francisco, where the keynote for Apple's (AAPL) Worldwide Developer Conference is getting underway.

    There was a line of people outside waiting to get in. Across the street, visible from the inside of Moscone, are large banners with the conference logo of overlapping, translucent colored squares, with the slogan “Where a whole new world is developing.”

    Apple shares are up $5.31, or 1.2%, at $447.12.

    Lights go down, and we're being treated to a video: animated black dots cavorting playfully on a white background, accompanied by text saying things such as “What do we want people to feel,” and “we simplify.”

    CEO Tim Cook is up on stage. He notes that the event, the 24th in Apple's history, has two thirds of its attendance from attendees new to the show. Cook notes the show sold out “in just over a minute.”

    Cook wants to start with a discussion of retail. Tens of thousand of kids picked a local Apple store for field trips, he notes, to some laughter. Showing shots of the new store in Berlin. Roll the video of the Berlin store opening…

    Next month is the fifth birthday of the App Store. He notes people have downloaded 50 billion times, and there are 900,000 apps, including 375,000 designed for iPad. “That compares to just a few hundred still from those other guys.”

    “We have now paid developers $10 billion,” says Cook, $5 billion in the last year. “That's three times more than all other platforms combined.”

    Cook highlights a development firm called Anki, which is working on robotics. He invites up co-founder Boris Sofman. They are graduates of Carnegie Mellon focusing on robotics. The first product is “Anki Drive.” A demo onstage has a racetrack with toy cars the company designed, which are performing artificial intelligence operations in conjunction with an iPhone. A small hitch: one of the cars doesn't want go. After a moment of doing something on the part of the assistant, the car manages to join the others on the track. A command can be sent to the individual robot race cars from the iPhone. They are instructed to block one of the cars and they swarm into formation, crowding the other car.

    Gamers can use iPhone or iPod Touch to control each race card. The product is coming to Apple stores this fall, says Sofman.

    Cook, back on stage, says the game is a great example of the combination of “your apps and the incredible iOS ecosystem.”

    Now Cook wants to talk about the Mac. He notes average annual growth of Mac in last five years, 15%, beats the 3% growth in PC unit shipments.

    To talk about OS X, Cook invites up Craig Federighi, head of software engineering. He says the company faces a naming issue, after plowing through names of different cats with each new release. Much laughter for that. He proposes “OS X Sea Lion,” to great laughter. “Okay, maybe not.”

    Instead, Federighi shows the California state flag, and says the first of California-inspired releases will be “Maverick,” named for the surfing culture.

    Federighi announces “tabs” for OS X's finder, to join different windows. Next, to big applause, “tagging” — apply categories to things across the file list, search tags.

    Next, multiple display support, with the ability to reach into menus and grab documents across displays, independently pan “Spaces” views on each display. Federighi notes that the “Mission Control” program is also fully integrated with the multiple displays, allowing one to drag files from one monitor to the other, or to move spaces from one display to another, and even use the Apple TV appliance to control yet another additional display through “AirPlay.”

    There are also improvements under the hood, including something called “timing coalescence.” There are hundreds of “interrupts” on the CPU when software is running. Maverick will reduce CPU interrupts by up to 72%, which will save battery life, he says.


    6-10-13

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    Apple Rolls Out OS X Mavericks With Tabbed Finder, System Tags, And Improved Multiple




    And like that Apple is off big cats and into California locations. The next version of OS X brings a host of new features including tabs in Finder and vastly improved support for more displays.

    Finder Tabs allows you to merge multiple windows into one window a la Safari. You can copy files among tabs and swap from tab to tab to see multiple folders and files.This feature, while not especially novel, is a welcomed feature that will eliminate those mess of windows that also seems to populate throughout the day.

    With OSX Mavericks, users can also now tag files, no matter where they live. When they are tagged, whether they’re on the computer’s hard drive or in iCloud, it’ll be able to be searched for within the same finder bar.

    Mavericks also supports menus and docks on multiple displays, addressing a concern users have had with the previous versions. Displays also offer independent swiping between desktops. Mission control has been super-charged for multiple displays. The new support also upgrades Airplay, allowing HDTVs to also act as a display.




    The new OS X also includes new CPU management tools, which, according to Apple reduces CPU usage by up to 72%.


    6-10-13

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    Apple OS X Mavericks: Everything You Need to Know




    While iOS 7 was expected to be the star of Apple's Worldwide Developer's Conference (WWDC) this year, it wasn't the only operating system getting a significant update. Supposedly codenamed "Cabernet" at headquarters, OS X Mavericks was unveiled on Monday with little fanfare. The specific improvements, however, are designed to improve performance across Apple platforms. So upgrading to OS X Mavericks won't just make life on your Mac easier. It'll make life easier.

    The latest version of OS X offers a number of understated improvements that will please power users. It will also please iPhone and iPad users, because many of the upgrades are basically all borrowed from or inspired by iOS. The update will supposedly iron out a lot of the (many) wrinkles in iMessage and iCloud, as well as overhaul some core pieces of Apple software. Finder will be getting some new browsing features, including tabs and tags, which should make surfing around your Mac a bit more like surfing the Web.

    From there, the upgrades start to drift pretty hard into power user territory. Screen-happy graphic designers out there will be happy to hear that full screen app support will now be supported on multiple displays. This includes the ability to summon the dock and use the menu bar on both displays. It also means you could be running Photoshop in fullscreen mode on your main display and keep Spotify open on your secondary display in fullscreen mode, open enough to see your playlists at least. Mission Control is also "supercharged" in OS X Mavericks, as is Apple TV which will now act as a full power display that interacts with your desktop. So you can move windows from Mission Control into Apple TV.

    Advanced Technology


    The new OS includes a lot of behind-the-scenes tech improvements, including increased battery life, compressed memory and so-called timer coalescing. All of these improvements will mean that the system will run better—up to 1.5x faster than in Mountain Lion.

    Related to the purely technical improvements comes a big update to the old password management app. It's called iCloud Keychain and saves not only passwords for the apps on your Mac but also your personal information on websites. Ostensibly, you'll never have to type in a password twice again.


    Safari


    Safari received see a number of improvements on the backend that include the ability to pause pages—"App Nap"—or tabs running in the background to shore up extra memory, save battery life and speed up the performance of whatever you're doing at the moment. This is what iOS already does in order to keep your web browsing snappy while you're on the go. Under the hood, there are big Javascript improvements, background tab optimization and power saver. Safari already ran about to 30 percent faster than Firefox and 50 percent faster than Chrome. Now it will be about 300 percent faster. It also uses less energy.


    Sound thrilling? Not really, but Apple's smart to reward its most faithful users with simple features they've been asking for.


    6-10-13

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    Apple WWDC: OS X ‘Maverick’; New MacBook Airs; New MacBook Pro




    I'm at the Moscone West convention center in San Francisco, where the keynote for Apple's (AAPL) Worldwide Developer Conference is getting underway.

    There was a line of people outside waiting to get in. Across the street, visible from the inside of Moscone, are large banners with the conference logo of overlapping, translucent colored squares, with the slogan “Where a whole new world is developing.”

    Apple shares are up $5.31, or 1.2%, at $447.12.

    Lights go down, and we're being treated to a video: animated black dots cavorting playfully on a white background, accompanied by text saying things such as “What do we want people to feel,” and “we simplify.”

    CEO Tim Cook is up on stage. He notes that the event, the 24th in Apple's history, has two thirds of its attendance from attendees new to the show. Cook notes the show sold out “in just over a minute.”

    Cook wants to start with a discussion of retail. Tens of thousand of kids picked a local Apple store for field trips, he notes, to some laughter. Showing shots of the new store in Berlin. Roll the video of the Berlin store opening…

    Next month is the fifth birthday of the App Store. He notes people have downloaded 50 billion times, and there are 900,000 apps, including 375,000 designed for iPad. “That compares to just a few hundred still from those other guys.”

    “We have now paid developers $10 billion,” says Cook, $5 billion in the last year. “That's three times more than all other platforms combined.”

    Cook highlights a development firm called Anki, which is working on robotics. He invites up co-founder Boris Sofman. They are graduates of Carnegie Mellon focusing on robotics. The first product is “Anki Drive.” A demo onstage has a racetrack with toy cars the company designed, which are performing artificial intelligence operations in conjunction with an iPhone. A small hitch: one of the cars doesn't want go. After a moment of doing something on the part of the assistant, the car manages to join the others on the track. A command can be sent to the individual robot race cars from the iPhone. They are instructed to block one of the cars and they swarm into formation, crowding the other car.

    Gamers can use iPhone or iPod Touch to control each race card. The product is coming to Apple stores this fall, says Sofman.

    Cook, back on stage, says the game is a great example of the combination of “your apps and the incredible iOS ecosystem.”

    Now Cook wants to talk about the Mac. He notes average annual growth of Mac in last five years, 15%, beats the 3% growth in PC unit shipments.

    To talk about OS X, Cook invites up Craig Federighi, head of software engineering. He says the company faces a naming issue, after plowing through names of different cats with each new release. Much laughter for that. He proposes “OS X Sea Lion,” to great laughter. “Okay, maybe not.”

    Instead, Federighi shows the California state flag, and says the first of California-inspired releases will be “Maverick,” named for the surfing culture.

    Federighi announces “tabs” for OS X's finder, to join different windows. Next, to big applause, “tagging” — apply categories to things across the file list, search tags.

    Next, multiple display support, with the ability to reach into menus and grab documents across displays, independently pan “Spaces” views on each display. Federighi notes that the “Mission Control” program is also fully integrated with the multiple displays, allowing one to drag files from one monitor to the other, or to move spaces from one display to another, and even use the Apple TV appliance to control yet another additional display through “AirPlay.”

    There are also improvements under the hood, including something called “timing coalescence.” There are hundreds of “interrupts” on the CPU when software is running. Maverick will reduce CPU interrupts by up to 72%, which will save battery life, he says.

    Fedrighi moves on to talking about the Safari Web browser. A new sidebar and a new reading list let you scroll documents off line, and also read links being shared on Twitter and such. It looks rather like making Safari a program like many news reader programs out there, albeit more slick.

    Federighi says Safari uses “way less memory than [Google's (GOOG)] Chrome, and when you compare it to Firefox, it's just said,” says Federighi. Federighi demonstrates the power-saving feature: bribing up a new iTunes window while running a CPU-intensive Web site immediately reduces the CPU activity, to much applause and expressions of “woah.” A new feature called Safari “keychain” will synchronize passwords across machines. The program will also auto-enter passwords. Much applause for that. It will prompt you for credit cards on e-commerce sites.

    Notifications get a boost, with the ability to respond to notices right from the notice, rather than jumping into a program. And the same push notifications that go to iPhone and iPad will now be available on the Mac.

    Federighi says the company is bringing its Maps program on iOS to the Mac. There's the ability to send a map coordinate right to the iPhone with a button push, and to bookmark sites and have those locations bookmarks

    The iBooks application also is coming to Mac.

    In the first sign of the rumored new approach to user interface under hardware guru Jony Ive, the new UI for the Calendar application on OS X has been radically tripped down, dumping the “leather” texture of the program for a very simple, clean look. Directions and travel times for a given appointment can be grabbed from the Maps program and added to the notes for the appointment.

    OS X Maverick will be out this fall, says Federighi.

    And now marketing chief Phil Schiller is on stage to talk about new MacBook Airs. The new models, using Intel's “Haswell” processors, feature either 9 or 12 hours of battery life, for the 11-inch and 12-inch models, respectively. They will come with the new “802.11ac” standard for short-range wireless. The 11-inch will come with 128 gigabytes of storage for $999, the 13-inch starting at $1099.

    Now, Schiller wants to offer a “sneak peak” of the new “Mac Pro.”

    It's a crazy, obsidian, cylindrical tower. “This is a machine unlike anything we've built before,” says Schiller. The boards are built around a new “thermal core,” says Schiller. “It even sounds cool.” It has new PCI-based flash memory, far faster, he says, and the 2.0 version of Thunderbolt.


    6-10-13

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    Apple unveils its latest desktop operating system: OS X Mavericks, coming this fall



    Developer conferences have taken a turn in recent years, becoming as much an opportunity for companies to interact with the dev community as a platform for launching hardware outside larger all-industry shows. This year's WWDC, however, has been all about the software thus far. Apple has, as anticipated, given the world its first glimpse of its latest desktop operating system. The Mountain Lion followup shifts away from the big cat naming, to a California-themed release: Mavericks, paying homage to the giant wave surfing spot.

    The first new feature is finder tabs: a browser-like system based in windows. Just add a tab by clicking plus in a window. You can also finally take the Finder full-screen. Also new, tagging. You can tag files based on location and other details, making them much searchable. There's a tagging sidebar that'll let you view them all in one handy place. Multiple Displays got a big cheer as well, letting you view menus across screens, viewing different apps in full screen mode on each display. You can independently pan on displays as well, and AirPlay connected HDTVs work a full, connected display. Apple showed off the new functionality to big cheers in the developer-packed room.
















    Also cool is the ability to respond to Notifications. You can also get your Notifications pushed to your lock screen and get updates pushed directly while your system is sleeping. Calendar finally dropped that leather scheme and added weather and Facebook updates. it will also add the travel time to your, so you don't overbook and will let you know exactly when you need to leave, in order to get there on time. Maps has come to Mac as well, bringing flyover data, turn by turn directions and the ability to send routes directly to your iPhone. Turn on your phone and there it is. Flyover data really does look impressive on the desktop -- we got a quick demo of a scan around the Eiffel Tower. You can add different locations to your bookmarks, which will sync across your devices.

    Apple also announced the addition of iBooks for the desktop, giving you a bigger screen for all of those pretty pictures, letting you really drill down into images for iBooks text books. Adding notes is easier, too, giving you a sidebar, where you can view them all at the same time. New Study Cards, meanwhile. make it easy to cram for that big test. Xcode 5, meanwhile, brings a slew of new tools for app developers, giving them the ability to measure performance, energy use and to test out heir products.

    Apple's promising better battery life through things like Compressed Memory and App Nap, which redirects power to different programs as you need it. The whole system can reduce CPU activity up to 72-percent, according to the company. The company also used the opportunity to show off the latest version of its Safari Browsing app. There's a new homepage with a cleaner layout and a sidebar with a reading list. Shared Links lets you check out links from your Twitter and LinkedIn friends. Power-savings is also on the list for the browser, along with bumped up performance benchmarks.

    Apple didn't give too much away with the latest operating system -- heck, we didn't even hear a number -- but the company's sure to show off more in the coming months. For now, the details, not surprisingly, seem to be primarily focused at developers (this is, keep in mind, the World Wide Developers Conference). It has yet to be seen how the company plans to further set itself apart from the competition in 2013. In the meantime, the company's offering up a developer preview today. The rest of us will have to wait until the fall, when you can download it from the Mac App Store.


    6-10-13

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    Apple Announces Mac OS X 'Mavericks'



    At today's WWDC keynote event, Apple announced the next version of its Mac operating system, dubbed "Mavericks" after a surfing area north of Half Moon Bay in California. Mavericks will feature many new Finder features including tabs, full-screen capability, tagging, and independent handling of multiple displays.

    Tagging items allows users to categorize and search for files more easily. With multiple displays, Finder will display a menu bar in each to allow easier control of all apps. Mission Control has also been modified to allow easy transfer of apps between displays. Mavericks will also display apps through a connected Apple TV.

    A new feature called Timer Coalescing will reduce CPU activity by smoothing out active processes and idle time while another new feature, Compressed Memory, will compress inactive memory to make free space available to running apps.

    Safari gets a revised Top Sites page and a sidebar with direct bookmark and Reading List access. Also visible in the sidebar are links shared by friends through social networks. The browser's memory and energy usage has also been improved in Mavericks.

    Keychain moves to iCloud in Mavericks to enable cross-device synchronization of passwords for use within Safari and other apps. Keychain will be able to suggest strong passwords and will remember credit card information to make online shopping easier.

    Notifications also get an overhaul with the ability to respond to iMessages or even decline Facetime calls right from the notification banner. After waking from sleep, notification banners for alerts receiving during sleep will appear on the lock screen.

    A Maps app will come to the Mac in Mavericks, offering search capabilities, Flyover views, and turn-by-turn directions and the ability to send directions directly to an iOS device.

    iBooks is also coming to the Mac in Mavericks with direct access to content available in the iTunes Store. Reading features include bookmarks, a night mode, and access to embedded multimedia elements.

    Registered developers can preview Mavericks starting today and the final public release of the OS is planned for the fall.


    6-10-13

    www.macrumors.com

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    OS X catches a wave, as Apple previews OS X Mavericks



    When it comes to OS X, the cat is out of the bag.

    Apple senior vice president of software engineering Craig Federighi introduced the next iteration of Apple’s Mac operating system on stage during Monday’s Worldwide Developers Conference kickoff. Federighi began his presentation with a sly nod to OS X’s past naming conventions. “We do not want to be the first software in history to be delayed due to a dwindling supply of cats,” he said. While “OS X Sea Lion” was briefly considered, Apple has instead decided to launch a new naming convention, based on inspiring places in California.

    The first of these releases—due out later this year—has been named OS X Mavericks, after the northern California surfing spot. Federighi previewed three new features present in Mavericks: Finder Tabs, Tags, and Multiple Displays. In addition, Mavericks includes a slew of under-the-hood improvements; updates to Safari, Calendar, and Notifications; new password syncing options via iCloud; and brings Maps and iBooks to the Mac.


    Finder tabs


    If you use tabs in Safari, Finder tabs will feel very similar; Apple has taken the same basic window structure, allowing you to combine multiple Finder windows into a single window with tabs along the top. You can even move files from one tab to the other by dragging and dropping.


    Tags


    Tags are OS X Mavericks’s answer to the Labels options of yore; you can tag files that are both stored in iCloud and on your local machine.

    You can add tags when saving documents: Select an already-used tag, or invent one on the spot. After you do, tags show up in your Finder sidebar. If you want to add a tag to older documents, just drag them into the tag category in the Finder sidebar.

    Tags are color-coded, and they’ve also been incorporated in Finder’s search feature, allowing you to search by tag (or multiple tags).


    Multiple displays


    Federighi announced multiple displays to cheers and applause throughout the keynote hall. “We’re not giving you a free multiple display here,” Federighi said. “It’s just software.”

    Mavericks’s multiple displays improves greatly upon the lackluster offerings found in Lion and Mountain Lion. Linen second-screen placeholders are gone, replaced with complete support for full screen apps on screen number one and desktop display on screen number two.

    In addition, OS X will provide multiple menu bars and Dock offerings for each display, draggable full-screen apps, independent display support for Mission Control and Spaces, and second-screen support for AirPlay-connected HDTVs.


    Under the hood improvements


    After providing brief demonstrations of three major new features coming to Mavericks, Federighi briefly touched on under the hood improvements to OS X’s performance and power.


    Accelerated scrolling


    OS X has improved scrolling across the board, offering smoother and faster acceleration inside apps. Federighi demonstrated accelerated scrolling inside both Mail’s messages screen and Safari’s Reading List.


    App Nap


    Much like iOS’s app freeze, OS X’s App Nap reduces power to apps when they’re not in the forefront. Federighi showed this feature off during his demonstration of Safari, using a CPU monitor to show the power drop-off when switching out of the program into iTunes.


    Compressed memory


    Compressed memory takes your inactive memory and compresses it to make free space available quickly. According to Federighi, users may see up to 1.4x speed improvements on an SSD from this feature.


    Safari innovations


    In OS X Mavericks, Safari has been given a giant under-the-hood overhaul, offering new speed and graphics acceleration. Safari also sports a new Shared Links pane, support for iCloud keychain, and new improvements to Reading List.


    Available later this year


    OS X Mavericks will be available “this fall,” according to Federighi; developers can pick up a preview from Apple’s developer portal today.


    6-10-13

    www.macworld.com

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    Here’s Where To Download OS X Maverick’s Beautiful New Wallpaper [Image] Read more a



    If you want to make your Mac look like it’s running OS X Mavericks but don’t want to wait for fall (or for the Apple developer site to stop crapping itself), here’s the default wallpaper OS X 10.9 now uses.

    Looks great, doesn’t it? Download it in high-resolution here.


    6-10-13

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    Maps, iBooks, iCloud Keychain coming to OS X Mavericks




    With support for Maps, users will be able to search for directions on their Mac, and easily send that route to their iPhone for use in their vehicle. The new Maps application for OS X offers the same features as its iOS counterpart, including the 3D Flyover functionality.

    Mavericks will also mark the debut of Apple's iBooks e-book platform on the Mac, including the iBookstore for purchasing new content. To date, iBooks has only been available for iOS devices.

    Users can highlight and add notes to iBooks titles in the sidebar. The software also includes a nighttime reading mode that is easier on the eyes in low-light environments.













    And iCloud Keychain will also provide cross-platform support for securely syncing and saving passwords and login information, including addresses and credit card data.

    An updated Calendar has continuous scrolling and gives an easier way of creating events, with suggested nearby locations and projected weather.


    6-10-13

    appleinsider.com

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