Google Music announced, tightly integrated with Google+

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    Google Music announced, tightly integrated with Google+

    Google launched its cloud-based music service, Google Music, focusing on leveraging a large Android user base and social networking to distribute 13 million tracks from over 1000 record labels including EMI, Universal and Sony.

    Google on Wednesday announced its rumored music service is live, extending the company's Music Beta program to everyone in the US and adding an online store that will tightly integrate with social networking hub Google+ and the Android marketplace.

    Google Music is based on the beta program that allowed users to upload and stream up to 20,000 of their own songs from the company's servers or "digital lockers." The free music storage service, which was previously an invite-only affair, is now open to the US public and will support an Android app that is planned to roll out over the next few days.

    "Today, our music beta becomes a full end-to-end service called Google Music," said Jamie Rosenberg, Director of Digital Content for Android.




    Google has tightly integrated its new music service with the company's Google+ social network, introducing a unique program that allows users to share music with friends. When music is purchased through Google Music, the song or songs will automatically appear on the purchaser's Google+ page where friends are granted a free one-time listen. Customers can also share songs via email if a friend doesn't have a Google+ account, though they will need to sign up in order to listen to the track.

    "Google Music is about discovering, purchasing and sharing music in new, innovative and personalized ways," Rosenberg said. "Other cloud services think you have to pay to listen to music you already own. We don't."

    Customers can make purchases from Google's online store or the Android app, and it was announced that T-Mobile will begin allowing customers to be billed through their monthly service plans.




    Songs from partner labels like EMI, Universal, Sony and over 1000 indy labels are priced in line with competition, with 320 Kbps digital tracks costing either $0.99 or $1.29. The store currently has 8 million tracks to choose from, and will add 5 million in the coming weeks.

    The format of the online store is similar to that of Apple's iTunes, and features artist bios, interviews, free tracks and more. All songs are stored in the cloud and can be either streamed to users via a Web-based player or a dedicated application. Downloads and offline listening are also available for songs stored in a user's digital locker.

    11-16-11

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    Why cant UK have it?

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    This is kind of neat. Just wish there was a iOS version BUT, I know there will never be due to the battle between Google/Android and Apple.

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    WSJ: Google Planning To Announce Streaming Music Service AT I/O Conference



    OK, so maybe not a huge surprise, but Google is said to launch a paid, subscription-based music service, like Rdio or Spotify, as soon as this week at the Google I/O conference, reports the Wall Street Journal.

    According to “people familiar with the matter,” says the WSJ, the announcement of the new service could happen as soon as tomorrow, when Google hosts it’s annual I/O developer conference. The WSJ says that Google has previewed new music initiatives at I/O in the past, so it might just announce the streaming service there, as well.

    The WSJ sources report that Google has already signed deals with Universal Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment and Warner Music Group to give customers access to certain libraries of songs for a fee.

    Google also already has a music service, Google Music, which launched in 2011 as part of Google Play for Android devices. It has since expanded to a global service, including Australia, and includes a matching service like Apple’s iTunes Match service in the US.

    The WSJ sources don’t know what the fee would be for such a service, or do they know if there will be advertising. Google makes most of its revenue from ads, though, so it seems like such a service would indeed include ads at some level, even a free one like similar offerings from Spotify, Pandora, and Rdio.

    Last year, Google unveiled Nexus Q music and video streaming, though the launch of the oddly-shaped and confusing ball-shaped object was delayed due to lack of positive consumer feedback.


    5-15-13

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